Note:  The following material is a scanned-in research resource; it is NOT intended as an exact reproduction of the original volume. Due to computer display variances, page numbers are approximate. Scanned at Phoenixmasonry by Ralph Omholt, PM - June 2007.

The History Of Freemasonry

By

Albert G. Mackey 33°


VOLUME SIX 

 

PART 3. - FREEMASONRY IN THE UNITED STATES

 

 

CHAPTER                                                                                 PAGE

                                                                                                [Original Volumes  /  This Copy]

55. - The First Lodge and the Grand Lodge

            of each State (cont'd) ……………………………….……….…. 1443   /  6

56. -The Introduction of Royal Arch Masonry into each State ….. 1487   /  88

57. - The Introduction of the Cryptic Degrees into each State .... 1549   /  157

58. - The First Commandery and the Grand Commandery

            in each State ......................................................................... 1601   /  262

59. - Colored Masonry in the United States .................................. 1641   /  309

60. - The Anti-Masonic Excitement ................................................ 1677   /  345

 

PART 4. - SYMBOLISM OF FREEMASONRY

 

 

CHAPTER                                                                                                    PAGE

 

1. -  Introduction ............................................................................. 1693   /  363

2. - Three Revelations .................................................................... 1712   /  379


 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

 

VOLUME SIX

PAGE

Benjamin B. French ……………………………………………….……. 1454   /  30

Plate of Symbols …………………………………………………..……. 1486   /  88

First View of Jerusalem by the Crusaders ………………………….1518   /  123

William James Hughan ……………………………………………….…. 1550   /  160

Warrant to Jeremy L. Cross to Confer the Degree of Select ……... 1552   /  164

A\A\S\R\ - Consistory of New York City …..……………………. 1582   /  198

Melrose Abbey ……………………………………………………………. 1614   /  278

DeWitt Clinton ……………………………………………………………. 1646   /  315

Unity, Peace, and Plenty ………………………………………….……. 1678   /  349

Final Defeat of the Crusaders at Acre  ………………………………. 1710   /  378

 
 




 

CHAPTER LV

 

HISTORY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF FREEMASONRY INTO EACH STATE AND TERRITORY OF THE UNITED STATES

 

The First Lodges and the Grand Lodges

(Continued)

 

Ohio

 

THE introduction of Masonry into Ohio is due to the fact that soon after the close of the War of the Revolution, the Master, Jonathan Heart, and some of the members of American Union Lodge settled near Marietta.

 

The Charter of that lodge, which had been granted by the St. John's Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, February 15, 1776, by John Rowe, Grand Master (in the Connecticut Line of the Army), (1) was held by the Master, and he claimed that it was a lodge at large and not under the jurisdiction of any Grand Lodge, and in fact "it was invested with every power necessary to constitute, rule, and govern" Masonry in the Territories.

 

It had been recognized "by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and New York, as a constituent of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts." This lodge worked for several years until its Charter was burned; a revival of it was asked for from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, which was declined, "except as one of its constituent" Application to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts was made, which authorized the lodge to resume work under a copy of the original Charter, "with the express provision that the charter should be of force only until a Grand Lodge should be formed in the territory in which it was located."

 

The Grand Lodge of Ohio was organized January 7, 1808.

 

 

 

(1) Shortly after, the lodge having removed to New York, asked for a Confirmation of their Charter, from the D.G.M., Dr. Middleton; but a new Warrant was granted under the name of Military Union, No.

 

1. - Gould's "History," vol. vi., P. 415.

 

 

The lodges represented were American Union, No. 1, at Marietta; Cincinnati, No. 13, warranted by the Grand Lodge of New Jersey as Nova Cesaraea, No. 10, now known as N.C. Harmony, No. 21; Sciota, No. 2, and Chillicothe, warranted by the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts in 1805, now known as No. 6; Erie, No. 47, at Warren, warranted by the Grand Lodge of Connecticut, March 16, 1804, now known as Old Erie, No. 3; and Amity, No. 105, at Zanesville, warranted by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania in 1804, now No. 5.

 

January 4, 1808, a preliminary convention of the delegates from all the lodges then in Ohio - six in number - was held in Chillicothe to deliberate upon the propriety of forming a Grand Lodge, and to inaugurate measures for the organization of such a body.

 

The convention continued its deliberations four consecutive days, which resulted in the unanimous adoption of a resolution proposed by Brother Lewis Cass, viz.: "that it is expedient to form a Grand Lodge of the State of Ohio." (1)

 

A few rules, couched as resolutions, were adopted for the formation of a Grand Lodge, and appointed the first Monday in January, 1809, as the time, and Chillicothe as the place for holding the first Grand Communication of said Grand Lodge.

 

The Grand Lodge met at Chillicothe, January 2, 1809, and duly organized with representatives from four lodges.

 

In consequence of the absence of the representatives of American Union Lodge, No. 1, there being but four lodges represented, it was thought that a Grand Lodge could not be legally organized.

 

The Grand Lodge adjourned from day to day, and, finally, on January 5th, it adopted pro tempore the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, having decided that under their peculiar circumstances it would be right and proper to organize a Grand Lodge with only four lodges represented.

 

Brother Rufus Putnam, who had been chosen Grand Master at the convention held in 1808, wrote a letter to the Grand Lodge declining the office, on account of his great age, which was accepted, and Bro. Samuel Huntington was duly elected Grand Master.

 

Previous to the reception of this letter all the other Grard Officers elected the last year had been installed, and upon the election of the Grand Master he also was immediately installed, and all the

 

(1) Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Ohio.

 

other Grand Officers who had just been elected at the same time with the Grand Master.

 

The Grand Lodge closed its sessions on January 7, 1709, having completed all things necessary to its proper work in Masonry.

 

 

 

Louisiana.

 

The introduction of Freemasonry in the Territory of Louisiana is principally due to the political condition of that Territory and the circumstances connected with the affairs in San Domingo, both counties at that period being somewhat, if not exclusively, settled by the Latin race and their negro slaves.

 

Masonry had been introduced upon the Island of San Domingo from the Grand Orient of France, also by charters from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

 

When the insurrection occurred in San Domingo, in 1791, the white refugees spread themselves in many of the cities in the United States; a very large number settled in New Orleans, and among them were many Masons, and in 1793 several of these residing in New Orleans organized into a lodge and received a Charter from the Grand Lodge of South Carolina by the name of "Parfaite Union, No.

 

29," the officers being installed in the York Rite on March 30, 1794. In the same year several Brethren of the French, or Modern Rite, formed themselves into a lodge called "Etoile Polaire" (Polar Star), and applied for a Charter from the Grand Orient of France.

 

The Grand Orient having suspended its labors, in consequence of the political condition of France, could not issue a Charter.

 

The Brethren, however, obtained a provisional Charter or dispensation from the Provincial Lodge La Parfaite Sincerile at Marseilles in 1796, and intrusted the same to Dominique Mayronne, with authority to constitute the new lodge and install the officers, which was done under the French Rite, December 27, 1798.

 

When the Grand Orient resumed labor in 1803, a Charter was issued to Polar Star Lodge, No. 4263, in 1804, and Ch. Tessier was deputed to deliver the Charter and heal their work, which was done, and officers were installed, November 11, 1804, by A. Pinard and A.Marmillion.

 

The early records of "Perfect Union" and "Polar Star" can not be found, but the above information has been obtained by Brother James H. Scot, the historian of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, from the "Manuel Maconnique," a very rare work, published in New Orleans in 1828.

 

It is very probable that these lodges were formed about the same time, "but in the absence of the original records it is impossible to decide the question." (1)

 

It is thought that the Brethren who formed these two lodges were from the Island of Guadaloupe, which was involved in the horrors of the negro insurrection of 1791.

 

In consequence of political differences among the French inhabitants in Louisiana, growing out of the French Revolution, difficulties arose which resulted in the refusal of the members of these two lodges to hold any Masonic intercourse with each other.

 

Some of the former members of "Candor Lodge, No. 12," in Charleston, S.C., which was extinct, having settled in New Orleans, applied to the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and obtained a Charter, dated May 18, 1801, as Candor Lodge, No. 90.

 

It is possible that this lodge did not survive very long, if it ever was duly constituted, as on March 1, 1802, the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania granted a Charter to Charity Lodge, No. 93, having the name of N.

 

Definieto, W. M., who was the W.M. of Candor, No. 90.

 

This Charter was not received until 1804, and on May 13th of that year the lodge was duly constituted and the officers were installed in the York Rite.

 

On October 1, 1800, by treaty, Spain retroceded the whole of the territory of Louisiana to France, which held an actual possession of only twenty days, as on December 20, 1803, the United States flag was raised in New Orleans, France having sold the whole territory to the United States.

 

This change in the political condition made equally a change in Masonic affairs, and from that date on, viz., 1804, Masonry assumed quite a different attitude in Louisiana.

 

A change also in the Island of San Domingo caused a very large number of the refugees of 1791 to return to their old homes, and the French contingent among the Masons in New Orleans was greatly reduced.

 

The American element, which had in Masonic matters been much in the minority, began to increase and soon prevailed.

 

A duplicate Charter from the Grand Orient of France was received, July 20, 1807, bearing date of February 17, 1806, by the Lodge "La Union Desiree," No. 3013, which had been under the auspices of the Grand Orient of France, at Port au Prince, April 16, 1783. During the revolution Of 1791 the Charter,

 

(1) James H. Scot, "History of Masonry in Louisiana."

 

archives, etc., had been destroyed.

 

The members who had fled to New Orleans in 1791, and had returned to San Domingo in 1802, had been again compelled to flee to New Orleans the second time.

 

In 1806 Masons from the Northern part of the United States applied for and obtained a Charter from the Grand Lodge of New York, on September 2, 1807, now Louisiana Lodge, No. 2. In the "Manuel Maconnique" it is No. 101, which is an error of the author.

 

This was the first lodge in New Orleans that worked in the English language, and its first W. M. was the celebrated jurist Edward Livingstone.

 

Polar Star Lodge, No. 4263, applied to the Grand Orient of France and obtained a Charter to hold a Chapter of Rose Croix, which was constituted and officers installed, May 24, 1807, as " La Vertu Recompensee, No. 5001."

 

On September 15, 1808, a York Rite Charter was issued to some of the members of Lodge La Reunion Desiree, No. 3829, by the same name but numbered 112, by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

 

This lodge dissolved March 23, 1812.

 

This much of the early history in Louisiana must suffice, as to continue a specific notice of all the lodges chartered and the various contests which grew out of the various rites in use, and the "Cumulation" thereof, would utilize our entire remaining pages of this chapter, hence must proceed to the organization of the Grand Lodge.

 

It appears from the records that twelve lodges had received charters in New Orleans prior to the organization of a Grand Lodge, as will appear in the following table:

 

Name of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date of Lodge

 

 

 

 

 

No.

 

 

 

By Whom Chartered

 

 

 

Charter

 

Perfect Union..29

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of South

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolina.....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 30, 1794.

 

Polar Star

 

4263

 

 

 

Pro. Lodge Sincerite,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marseilles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 27, 1798.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reconstructed by Grand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oriental of France

 

 

 

 

 

November 11, 1804.

 

Candor

 

 

 

 

 

90

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 18, 1801.

 

Charity

 

 

 

 

 

93

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 1, 1802.

 

Reunion Desiree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3829

 

 

 

Grand Orient of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

France

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 17, 1807.

 

Louisiana

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2,1807.

 

Reunion Desiree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

117

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 15, 1808.

 

Concord

 

 

 

117

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 7, 1810.

 

 

 

Perseverance

 

118

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 7, 1810.

 

Harmony

 

 

 

122

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 19, 1810.

 

Polar Star

 

 

 

129

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Lodge of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 3, 1811.

 

Bienfaisance

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

Grand Consistory of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamaica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 22, 1811.

 

 

 

Of these lodges, Candor, No. 90, York Rite, was perhaps never organized; Reunion Desiree, No. 3829, French Rite, ceased to work, November 27, 1808; Polar Star, No. 4293, French Rite, adjourned sine die, October 13, 1811; Reunion Desiree, No. 112, York Rite, dissolved, March 23, 1812; and Bienfaisance, No. 1, Scottish Rite, affiliated with Concord, No. 117, May 27, 1812, leaving seven lodges in full activity and all working the York Rite, viz.: Numbers 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12, in the above table.

 

 

 

Louisiana was admitted as a State by Act of Congress, April 8, 1812, to take effect after April 30th.

 

This change politically had a corresponding result masonically.

 

Perfect Union Lodge, No. 29, had the honor of taking initiatory steps toward the organization of a Grand Lodge, which resulted in a meeting, April 18, 1812, of the delegates of Perfect Union Lodge, No. 29; Charity Lodge, No. 93; Louisiana Lodge, No. 1; Concord Lodge, No. 117; Perseverance Lodge, No. 118; Harmony Lodge, No.

 

122; and Polar Star Lodge, No. 129.

 

These delegates organized themselves into a "General Committee of the State of Louisiana to provide for the establishment of a Grand Lodge in the City of New Orleans." P. F. Dubourg was the first President.

 

On May 16th following a second meeting was held, Charity Lodge, No.

 

93, not being represented; and a communication was received from Louisiana Lodge, No. 1, saying that in their opinion "it would be inexpedient at present" to join in the proposed formation of a Grand Lodge; whereupon a resolution was passed requesting the W.

 

Master of the Senior of the regular lodges in the State, Perfect Union, No. 29, to issue his summons (1) to the Masters, Past Masters, and Officers of the several Ancient and regularly constituted lodges in the State to meet in convention to take into consideration the interests of the true Craft, and to deliberate on the necessity of establishing a Grand Lodge in the State, which was accordingly done, and the convention met June 13, 1812, and the following representatives were present, viz.: Perfect Union, No.

 

29; Charity, No. 93; Concord, No. 117; Perseverance, No. 118; Polar Star, No. 129.

 

As soon as the convention was organized the President, Brother Dubourg, stated that he had received a communication from Harmony Lodge, No. 122, which had withdrawn from the convention.

 

The convention adjourned to meet June 20th next.

 

June 20, 1812, the Grand Convention then met and elected the Grand Officers; P.F. Dubourg being elected Grand Master, who was duly installed after the election of the Grand Officers, and by a resolution adopted, the Grand Master installed all the other Grand Officers on July 11th following.

 

At a communication held August 15, 1812, the committee appointed for that purpose reported a draft of a Constitution which was adopted.

 

(1) Ancient term for Notification.

 

 

 

At a quarterly communication held March 27, 1813, the Grand Master announced that a Grand Royal Arch Chapter had been organized and attached to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana.

 

The Grand Chapter had been organized, March 8, 1813, by Concord and Perseverance R.'.

 

A.'. Chapter, working under charters from the Grand Chapter of Pennsylvania and attached to the lodges of the same name.

 

On March 13th the Grand Officers were elected and installed.

 

To follow the history of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana would require more space than can be permitted; here we must close with the date of March, 1813.

 

Tennessee.

 

Warrants to organize lodges had been issued from the Grand Lodge of North Carolina as early as 1796 and one from Kentucky.

 

These lodges held a convention at Knoxville in December, 1811, and adopted the following:

 

"Resolved, That in the opinion of this Convention the number of Ancient York Masons in this State as well as the state of society, require the formation of a Grand Lodge within the same for the better regulation and extension of the Craft.

 

"Resolved, That a Committee be appointed for the purpose of drawing up an address to the Grand Lodge of North Carolina, soliciting their assent to the establishment of a Grand Lodge in the State of Tennessee."

 

The Grand Lodge of North Carolina granted this request; and the convention again met October 14, 1813, and the Grand Lodge was constitutionally established and the Grand Officers were elected and installed.

 

Mississippi

 

The first lodge in Mississippi which received a Warrant from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky was Harmony, No. 33; originally No. 7, by a Charter October 16, 1801.

 

Two other lodges, viz.: Andrew Jackson, No. 15, and Washington, No. 17, received their warrants from the Grand Lodge of Tennessee July 27, 1818.

 

A convention was held in the city of Natchez, when it was resolved that it was necessary and expedient to form a Grand Lodge for the State of Mississippi.

 

On August 25th following, the convention again met, and the Grand Lodge was regularly constituted.

 

Henry Toohey was elected Grand Master.

 

Illinois.

 

The Grand Master of Pennsylvania, Israel Israel, issued a dispensation for six months to Western Star Lodge, No. 107, to be located at Kaskaskia, situated near the mouth of the Okaw (now Kaskaskia) River, where it empties into the Mississippi River, September 24, 1805.

 

At that period Illinois was in the Indian Territory.

 

This lodge received its Charter, which was granted June 2, 1806, and on September 13th following, the lodge was regularly constituted.

 

This lodge was doubtless the first one established in that Territory - now comprising the States of Wisconsin and Illinois and a part of Minnesota.

 

The Grand Lodge of Kentucky issued a Charter, August 28, 1815, to Lawrence Lodge, to be located at Shawneetown; the Grand Lodge of Tennessee issued a Charter, October 6, 1819, to Libanus Lodge, at Edwardsville; June 20, 1820, the Grand Master of Tennessee issued a dispensation to Temple Lodge, at Belleville, St. Clair County, which was surrendered in 1821.

 

From the Grand Lodge of Missouri at various dates in 1822 the following warrants were granted: October 3, 1822, Olive Branch, No.

 

5, at Alton, Ill. ; October 8, 1822, Vandalia, No. 8, at Vandalia; October 9, 1822, Sangamon, No. 9, at Springfield; October 24, 1822, Union, No. 10, at Jonesborough; October 8, 1822, Eden, No. 11, at Covington.

 

The Grand Master of Indiana issued a dispensation, March 12, 1822, to Albion Lodge, at Albion.

 

All the above lodges except Sangamon sent delegates to a convention at Vandalia which met December 9, 1822.

 

They adopted a constitution, which was sent to the lodges for their consideration.

 

Eight of these lodges were represented at a convention held December 1 1823, and a Grand Lodge was duly organized.

 

The Grand Master was installed by Dr. Hardage Lane, of St. Louis, Mo., the Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri.

 

In 1827 the Grand Lodge of Illinois went out of existence, and after June 24, 1827, "every Lodge in the State was so effectually blotted out that no trace of any of them has been found."

 

It is supposed that as the anti-Masonic excitement had, about that time, begun to work its way to the West, the Masons were more or less lukewarm in the cause, and politics being somewhat mixed up in the affair, the Brethren let the matter drop for a while.

 

The Grand Lodge of Kentucky issued a dispensation to Bodley Lodge, No. 97, at Quincy, Ill., there being at that time no working lodge in the State. That lodge was warranted August 30, 1838.

 

That Grand Lodge likewise warranted Equality Lodge, No. 102, at Equality, in Gallatin County, August 29, 1837; and Ottawa, No. 114, at Ottawa County, of Lasalle, September 1, 1740.

 

The Grand Master of Kentucky issued a dispensation to Friendship Lodge at Dixon in 1840.

 

The Grand Lodge of Missouri warranted:

 

Franklin Lodge, at Alton, in 1827 Harmony Lodge, at Jacksonville, in 1838 Springfield Lodge, at Springfild, in 1839 Temperance Lodge, at Vandalia, in 1839 Far West Lodge, at Galena, in

 

1839 Mount Moriah Lodge, at Hillsboro, in 1840 Clinton Lodge, at Carlisle, in 1840

 

A dispensation to Columbus Lodge, No. 20, at Columbus, in 1839.

 

Delegates from several of the subordinate lodges on January 30, 1840, held a convention in Jacksonville, when it was resolved to form a Grand Lodge.

 

A committee was appointed to correspond with the lodges in the State and ask their assistance, and to send delegates to a convention to be held at Jacksonville, April 6, 1840, which convention was held on that date and six of the eight chartered lodges and one under dispensation were represented, and the Grand Lodge was then organized.

 

At the meeting held April 28th, the Grand Master, Abraham Jonas, was installed by proxy. (1) Warrants were issued to the lodges represented and numbered according to their dates of constitution-

 

(1) The "Reprint of the Proceedings for 1840 to 1860," published 1874, shows : April 6, 1840, at Jacksonville, "M.W. Abraham Jonas was elected G.M." April 28th, "called from refreshment to labor." The name of Abraham Jonas does not appear as being present.

 

James Adams, D.G.M., presided.

 

The minutes say: "On motion all but Past Masters having retired a convocation of Past Masters was declared open, and the M.W. Grand Master was installed by proxy, and the grand honors paid him agreeable to ancient form and usage."

 

some of them, however, did not get their new warrants until sometime in 1844.

 

In consequence of the business relations existing between many of the towns in Illinois and the city of St. Louis in Missouri, some of the lodges in those towns much preferred to hold their warrants from Missouri Grand Lodge, as the representatives could attend the Grand Lodge of Missouri in St. Louis, and at the same time transact their commercial business in that city.

 

The writer was an officer of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1841-42-43 and well remembers that those Brethren from Illinois were urged to withdraw from our Grand Lodge and unite with the Grand Lodge in their own State.

 

They, however, declined for the reason above stated.

 

We can bear witness to this as a justification of the conduct of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, for they could not drive away their Brethren of Illinois.

 

Finally, however, those lodges did withdraw and unite with the Grand Lodge of Illinois, as also did several of the lodges in Iowa, about that time, which had been chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and they formed the Grand Lodge of Iowa.

 

On February 10 1850, a fire occurred in Peoria by which was destroyed, in the office of the Grand Secretary, all the books, papers, and records of the Grand Lodge of Illinois.

 

To remedy the loss as far as possible, the Grand Lodge was convened in Springfield, April 8, 1850.

 

Of the lodges aiding in the organization of the second Grand Lodge, four are now alive, viz: Bodley, No. 1; Equality, No. 2; Harmony, No. 3; and Springfield, No. 4.

 

In 1889, October 1st and 2d, the fiftieth anniversary was celebrated.

 

The Grand Lodge of Illinois, in her growth since its organization in 1839, has kept even pace with the increase of population, and now stands in membership among the first in the United States, in 1897 the membership number being 53,452, number of lodges, 722. In her influence for good and the reputation of her personnel she is primus inter pares (first among her equals).

 

Missouri

 

The first settlers of Upper Louisiana, as the now State of Missouri was originally called, were French, who came by the way of Canada, and were companions of Cartier, La Salle, and Father Hennepin, who traversed the vast wilderness that extended between the boundaries of Canada and the settlements of the French on the Lower Mississippi.

 

In November, 1763, Pierre Liguiste Laclede arrived at St.

 

Genevieve, and finding no place suitable for the storage of his good, he proceeded up the Mississippi River; and on February 15, 1764, he and his party landed where the city of St. Louis now stands, which he named in honor of Louis XV. of France.

 

In that early day the merchants who were in St. Louis and St.

 

Genevieve procured their goods in Philadelphia, where they went once every year.

 

Many of these merchants became Masons and were made in the French Lodge, No. 73, in Philadelphia.

 

As the Masons in the Territory increased in numbers, they resolved to organize a lodge, and in 1807-8 having applied for, they received a Warrant of Constitution from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania for a lodge in the town of St. Genevieve, as Louisiana Lodge, No. 109.

 

Otho Strader was the first Master.

 

Among its members were many of those who afterward became prominent merchants of St. Louis, as Pierre Chouteau and Bartholomew Berthold, who became the founders of the great Fur Company. (1)

 

This was the first lodge established in Missouri.

 

In 1811-12 Gen. H. Dodge presided over this lodge as W. Master, but owing to the unsettled condition of the Territory in consequence of the late war with Great Britain, the lodge ceased to work about 1825.

 

In 1809-10 the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania granted a Warrant to a lodge in St. Louis as No. 111. There is no record whatever of this lodge remaining.

 

A dispensation was issued by the Grand Lodge of Indiana in 1820 for a lodge in Jackson, now in Cape Gerardeau County.

 

This lodge was subsequently chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri.

 

October 18, 1816 the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a

 

(1) Geo. F. Gouley, "History of Grand Lodge of Missouri."

 

Charter to a lodge in St. Louis as Missouri Lodge, No. 12, which is still in existence as No. 1.

 

That Grand Lodge also granted charters to the following lodges, viz. : October 6, 1819, to Joachim Lodge, No. 25, at Herculaneum, and on same date to St. Charles Lodge, No. 28, at St. Charles on the Missouri River.

 

February 23, 1821, by an invitation sent by Missouri Lodge, No. 12, to the several lodges in the State, the following lodges, by their representatives, met in St. Louis, and a committee having been appointed to draft a constitution and code of bylaws they adjourned until April 23d following, to meet at the same place to organize a Grand Lodge.

 

Prior to this date (April 23, 1821), a convention of Masons met, pursuant to previous notice given by the convention of delegates, at the lodge-room of Missouri Lodge, No. 12, April 23d, Anno Lucis, Year of Light, 5821, for the purpose of organizing the Grand

 

Lodge of the State of Missouri.

 

Opened in the third degree in due form, with Wor. Edward Bates, (1) Master, and others.

 

After reading the proceedings of the convention held February 22d last, adjourned until 24th inst.

 

 

 

April 24, A.L. 5821. Present as before.

 

An election for the officers for the ensuing year was held and resulted as follows

 

Brother Thos. F. Riddick, M.W.G.M.

 

 

 

"

 

James Kennerly, S.G.W.

 

 

 

"

 

William Bates, J.G.W.

 

 

 

"

 

Archibald Gamble, G. Treasurer.

 

 

 

"

 

William Renshaw, G. Secretary.

 

Adjourned to May 4th next.

 

May 4th A.L. 5821, Semi-Annual Convocation was held, a procession was formed and proceeded to the Baptist Church, where the solemn ceremony of consecration and installation was performed, in conformity with the ancient landmarks and customs of the Fraternity.

 

The Grand Lodge then returned to the lodge-room and adjourned until next day. (2)

 

The first annual communication was held October 1, 1821.

 

(1) Hon. Edward Bates was Attorney-General in Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet, 1861-64.

 

Nearly every member of this Grand Lodge was personally known to the present writer in 1837.

 

(2) Geo. F. Gouley, "History of Grand Lodge of Missouri."


 

 

BENJAMIN B. FRENCH
 

 

At this communication Brother Frederick Bates was elected Grand Master, who, not being present, was notified by a committee, but declined accepting the office.

 

Grand Lodge adjourned until October 10, 1821, at which time the Grand Lodge resumed labor and elected Brother N.B. Tucker M.W. Grand Master, and Edward Bates G.S.W.

 

The Grand Lodge then adjourned until 7 P.M., when at the request of Bro. Thos. F.Riddick, Brother Douglass took the Chair and installed Brother Nathaniel B. Tucker Most Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in ample form, and the Past Master's Lodge was closed, and the other Grand Officers were duly installed into their respective offices.

 

Thus the Grand Lodge of Missouri was constituted and has continued to the present day, and the writer, who the commencement of his own Masonic career, January 18, 1840, could personally testify to the character and standing, in the community of the State of Missouri, to nearly every member of that distinguished body of men and Masons, upon whose shoulders the interests of our noble institution, at that time, were placed by the Grand Lodge.

 

In the year 1841 the writer was appointed the Senior Grand Deacon of the Grand Lodge by Hon. Priestly H. McBride, Grand Master, and was reappointed in 1842 and 1843.

 

A very large proportion of those who organized the first Grand Lodge continued as members and officers of the Grand Lodge up to the year 1844, when by accessions of lodges which had been chartered from 1821 to 1840, the number had increased from four to twenty-five, which was Naphtali, and in which we received the three degrees.

 

In 1841-42 several lodges had been chartered in Iowa, and among them was Iowa Lodge, No. 42, of which our very distinguished Brother Theodore S. Parvin was Wor.

 

Master, and we mention this circumstance to state that he and the writer are the only surviving members of that Grand Lodge of 1841 to 1844.

 

Indiana.

 

As early as 1795 members of the Fraternity who had been connected with lodges in the army on the northwest frontier, introduced Free Masonry into the Territory.

 

The first lodge, however, was organized by a dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, August 31, 1808, at Vincennes, by the name of Vincennes Lodge, No.

 

15.

 

The following lodges were also granted warrants by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky: At Madison, Union Lodge, No. 29, August 31, 1815; at Charlestown, Blazing Star, No. 36, August 25, 1816; at Salem, Melchizedeck, No. 43; Lawrenceburg, Lawrenceburg, No. 44; and at Corydon, Pisgah, No. 45, all August 25, 1817.

 

The Grand Master of Kentucky, after the annual meeting of the Grand Lodge, issued a dispensation for the Lodge at Switzerland, and one for Rising Sun Lodge, at Rising Sun.

 

A dispensation for lodge Brookville Harmony, No. 41, at Brookville, was issued by the Grand Master of Ohio in 1816 or 1817.

 

A general convention of the representatives of the following lodges of Ancient York Masons of the State of Indiana was held at Corydon on December 3, 1817, viz. :

 

Name of Lodge.

 

No.

 

Location.

 

Representative.

 

Vincennes

 

 

 

5

 

Vincennes

 

G.W. Johnston.

 

Lawrenceburg

 

44

 

Lawrenceburg

 

James Dill Switzerland

 

U.D.of Ky Vevay

 

 

 

Hezekiah B. Hull.

 

Rising Sun

 

U.D.of Ky Rising Sun

 

A.C. Pepper.

 

Madison Union

 

29

 

Madison

 

 

 

H.P. Thornton.

 

Blazing Star

 

36

 

Charlestown

 

Jos. Bartholomew.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Miller.

 

Brookville Harmony.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41 U.D.Ohio. Brookville

 

Stephen C. Stevens.

 

Salem

 

 

 

 

 

43

 

Salem

 

 

 

Christ Harrison.

 

Pisgah

 

 

 

 

 

45

 

Corydon

 

 

 

Davis Floyd.

 

 

 

Brother Alexander Buckner was unanimously chosen President, and Davis Floyd unanimously elected Secretary.

 

The convention then adopted the following:

 

"Resolved, That it is expected and advisable that a Grand Lodge should be at this time formed in the State of Indiana."

 

All the above representatives voted in the affirmative except those of Harmony and Pisgah.

 

The convention then adopted the following:

 

"Resolved, That a committee of four members be appointed to inform the M.W. Grand Masters of Kentucky and Ohio that a constitutional number of chartered lodges have determined in general convention to form a Grand Lodge in this State, and consequently will secede from their Mother Lodge so soon as a Grand Lodge is organized."

 

The convention also

 

"Resolved, That the several subordinate lodges here represented do appoint one or more delegates to meet at Madison on the second Monday in January next, for the purpose of opening a Grand Lodge for the State of Indiana; and that a Communication be forwarded to the rest of the lodges in this State unrepresented in this convention, of the above determination."

 

This resolution was adopted :

 

Harmony, No. 41; Lawrenceburg, No. 44; Switzerland, U.D.; Rising Sun, U.D.; and Madison, No. 29, voted in the affirmative, five.

 

Vincennes No. 15; Salem, No. 43; Pisgah, No. 45; and Blazing Star, No. 36, voted in the negative, four.

 

A Grand Communication of the subordinate lodges of the State of Indiana was held Monday, January 12, A.L. 5818.

 

Representatives of the following lodges were present: Rising Sun, U.D.; Union, No. 29; Switzerland, U.D.; Blazing Star, No. 36.

 

Delegates were reported by the Committee on Credentials, and admitted as being duly appointed by their respective lodges, viz. : Harmony Lodge, Brookville, U.D., from Grand Lodge of Ohio; Lawrenceburg, No. 44; Vincennes, No. 15; Melchizedeck, No. 43; Pisgah, No. 45.

 

The following resolution was adopted: "Resolved, That the chartered lodges here represented do now separate for a time from the lodges under dispensation, and proceed immediately to organize a Grand Lodge for the State of Indiana."

 

Brother Alexander A. Meek, being the oldest Past Master present, was called to the Chair.

 

Melchizedeck Lodge surrendered her Charter but declined having a new one.

 

January 13th the Grand Officers were duly elected, M.W. Alexander Buckner, Grand Master.

 

The representatives from lodges Nos. 15, 29, 36, 43, 44, 45, holding charters from the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, surrendered the same, and asked to have charters granted to their respective lodges by the Grand Lodge of Indiana, which was accordingly done on the 14th, viz. :

 

Vincennes Lodge, No. 1, Vincennes; Union Lodge, No. 2, Madison; Blazing Star Lodge, No. 3, Charlestown; Lawrenceburg Lodge, No. 4, Lawrenceburg; Melchizedeck Lodge, No. 5; Pisgah Lodge, No. 6, Corydon; which lodges received their charters at this communication.

 

The Grand Constitution was adopted January 15th.

 

The illustrations of Masonry of Thomas Smith Webb were adopted for the government of the Grand Lodge, and were recommended to be adopted by all the subordinate lodges of the State for the government of the same.

 

Charlestown was selected as the site for the meeting of the Grand Lodge for the present.

 

The Junior Grand Warden being a member of Melchizedeck Lodge, which declined a Charter, the office became vacant and an election was held to fill the same, and Brother Benjamin V. Becks was duly elected.

 

The Grand Lodge met in various towns and cities until 1828, when it removed to Indianapolis, and has continued to do so ever since.

 

Alabama.

 

The first lodge in Alabama was Madison, No. 21, at Huntsville, which was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, August 28, 1812. The Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a Charter to Alabama Lodge, No. 21, at Huntsville, October 6, 1818.

 

The Grand Lodge of South Carolina granted a Charter to Alabama Lodge, No. 51, at Clairborne, in 1819; the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a Warrant to Rising Virtue Lodge, No. , at Tuskaloosa, October 5, 1818; and the Grand Master of Tennessee issued a dispensation to Halo Lodge, at Cahawba, April 4, 1820, and which continued until October, 1821; but the Grand Lodge of Georgia issued a Warrant to Halo Lodge, No.

 

21, January 24, 1821; the Grand Lodge of Tennessee issued a Charter to Moulton Lodge, at Moulton, October 3, 1820; the Grand Lodge of Tennessee granted a dispensation to Russellville Lodge, October 3, 1820; a dispensation from the Grand Master of Tennessee was issued to Farrar Lodge, at Elyton, March 5, 1821; the Grand Lodge of North Carolina granted a Charter to St. Stephen's Lodge, at St.

 

Stephen's, December 14, 1816; Washington Lodge and Tuscumbia Lodge were granted charters by the Grand Lodge of Tennessee.

 

Tuscumbia had never reported its work, and soon went out of existence.

 

Washington very soon gave up her Charter.

 

The name of Madison Lodge, No. 21, was changed to Helion; Alabama Lodge, No. 21, at Huntsville, was changed to Bethsaida; soon afterward a consolidation took place and these two and Helion and Bethsaida became Helion, No. 1. Of all the above lodges there only remain at the present time Rising Virtue, No. 4; Moulton, No. 6; and Farrar, No. 8.

 

The Grand Lodge was organized by the above - mentioned lodges and a constitution was adopted and signed June 15, 1821.

 

December 6, 1836, a quorum was not present; and after waiting for three days, those who were present declared the Grand Lodge extinct.

 

The representatives of the lodges present reorganized a Grand Lodge, a new constitution was adopted, new Grand Officers were elected, and the old warrants were re-granted.

 

Arkansas.

 

 

 

November 29, 1819, a dispensation for Arkansas Lodge, located at the Port of Arkansas, was issued by the Grand Lodge of Kentucky.

 

A Charter was granted, August 29, 1820, Robert Johnson being W.

 

Master.

 

This lodge surrendered her Charter, August 28, 1822.

 

A dispensation to organize Washington Lodge at Fayetteville was issued by the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, December 24, 1835; and it mas renewed, November 12, 1836. October 3, 1837, a Charter was granted, and the lodge received as a present a set of jewels.

 

A dispensation was granted from the same Grand Lodge for a lodge at Clarksville, October 5, 1838, to which a Charter was issued, October 12, 1839. The dispensation of Clarksville Lodge was received prior to the organization of the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, but the Charter was issued after that event.

 

This lodge continued under the constitution of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee until 1843, when it came under the Grand Lodge of Arkansas as No. 5. In 1845 it ceased to work and surrendered the Charter.

 

January 6, 1837, the Grand Lodge of Louisiana issued warrants to two lodges in Arkansas, viz. : Morning Star, at Arkansas Post, and Western Star, at Little Rock.

 

The seat of State Government having been changed to Little Rock, Morning Star Lodge gave up the Charter.

 

A dispensation was issued by the Grand Master of Alabama in 1838 to Mount Horeb Lodge in Washington.

 

November 21, 1838, a convention was held and representatives from Washington, Morning Star, Western Star, and Mount Horeb, U.D., were present at which a constitution was adopted and officers were elected and the Grand Lodge was duly constituted.

 

Wisconsin

 

The history of Freemasonry in the territory now embraced in the State of Wisconsin dates from December 27, 1823.

 

The only known record of the first lodge in what is now Wisconsin is founded in an address delivered at Green Bay, December 17, 1854, by P.G.M. Henry S. Baird.

 

He says:

 

The first action had with a view to organize a lodge of Masons at Green Bay is found in proceedings of a meeting of the members of the Fraternity, held on the evening of the 27th day of December, A.D. 1823.

 

A committee was appointed to draft a petition to the Grand Lodge of the State of New York, praying for a dispensation to open and hold a Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons at Green Bay, then in the Territory of Michigan.

 

In due time the prayer of the petitioners was responded to, and a dispensation granted.

 

On September 2, 1824, the first regular Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons was opened and organized at Fort Howard, directly opposite to the city, under a dispensation from the M.W. Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York.

 

The officers named in the dispensation were:

 

Robert Irwin, Sr.,W. Master.

 

Benjamin Watson, S. Warden.

 

W. V. Wheaton, J. Warden.

 

On December 3, 1824, a regular Charter was granted by the M.W.

 

Grand Lodge of New York.

 

Mineral Point Lodge, No. 1, was organized July 27, 1841, from the Grand Lodge of

 

Missouri, under dispensation dated October 8, 1840, named "Melody" (for Bro. George H.C. Melody, P. Dep. Grand Master of Missouri) Lodge, No. 65 (now No. 2).

 

A dispensation was issued by Brother Joab (1) T. Bernard, Dep.

 

Grand Master, January 10, 1843.

 

A Charter was granted by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, October 13, 1843. (2)

 

A preliminary meeting, having in contemplation the formation of a Masonic lodge, was held at the house of John Beavans, in the town of Platteville, in the month of January, A.D. 1843.

 

MILWAUKEE LODGE, NO. 22 (NOW KILBOURN LODGE, No. 3)

 

The first meeting of this lodge was held July 5, A.L. 5843, A.D.

 

1843.

 

Bro. Normand Hawley, representing the Grand Master of Illinois, presented the dispensation which he had been deputed to bring to them.

 

The exact date of the Charter of this lodge does not appear from the minutes.

 

In the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, October 2, 1843, the committee on Returns and Work recommended granting a Charter to Milwaukee Lodge, No. 22, "when dues are paid; "and on the first day of November, 1843, the election of officers was held under the Charter, 1843.

 

ACTION RELATIVE TO THE FORMATION OF A GRAND LODGE, NOVEMBER 22, 1843.

 

The worshipful Master, Bro. Abram D. Smith, presented a communication from Melody Lodge, at Platteville, upon the subject of establishing a Grand Lodge in the Territory of Wisconsin, which was read, and the Master and Wardens were appointed a committee to correspond with Platteville and Mineral Point lodges upon the subject.

 

The Charter of Milwaukee Lodge, No. 3, is dated January 17, 1844.

 

(1) Incorrectly called in the record John.

 

(2) The present writer was S.G.D. of the Grand Lodge of Missouri at that time.

 

MASONIC CONVENTION HELD AT MADISON ON THE 18TH DAY OF DECEMBER, A.D. 1843.

 

The following lodges were represented:

 

Milwaukee Lodge, at Milwaukee.

 

Mineral Lodge, at Mineral Point.

 

Melody Lodge, at Platteville.

 

Bro. Moses Meeker was called to the Chair, and Bro. Geo. W. Lakin was appointed Secretary.

 

On motion of Bro. Ben. C. Eastman, it was

 

Ordered, That a committee consisting of two be appointed to receive and examine the credentials of the members of the convention.

 

The committee appointed to receive and examine the credentials of the members of the convention, being the legal representatives of the regularly constituted lodges of the Territory of Wisconsin, to take into consideration and determine upon the expediency of forming a Grand Lodge within the said Territory, have attended to the duty assigned them, and submit the following:

 

Your committee find that there are seven members of said convention representatives of the lodges aforesaid, to wit:

 

From Milwaukee, Mineral Point, and Melody lodges.

 

On motion of Bro. Ben. C. Eastman, it was

 

Ordered, That a committee of three be appointed to take into consideration the expediency of forming a Grand Lodge in the Territory of Wisconsin.

 

The Chair appointed Bros. Ben. C. Eastman, Dwight F. Lawton, and Geo. H. Walker said committee.

 

Bro. Ben. C. Eastman, from said committee, submitted the following

 

REPORT.

 

The committee appointed to take into consideration the expediency of forming a Grand Lodge in the Territory, have attended to their duty, and ask leave to report the following preamble and resolutions:

 

Whereas, There are now, within the Territory of Wisconsin, three chartered lodges, all of which are in a prosperous and happy condition; and

 

Whereas, It is competent for that number of lodges to emerge from a state of dependency, become legally organized, and be hereafter established and known as a separate, distinct, and independent body, having its own jurisdiction and

 

Whereas, In the rapidly increasing population of our Territory, it is believed many more lodges will immediately spring into existence whereby the great principles of Masonry will be promulgated, if the facilities for obtaining dispensations and charters are increased as they will be by the organization of a Grand Lodge in Wisconsin; and

 

Whereas, The Great Lights of Masonry should not be hidden under a bushel, but should shine in the fullness of their strength, that none may want a guide for their faith and practice, and that their acts be squared by the precepts of the Great Architect of the Universe, and their desire be circumscribed by the principles of morality and their passions restrained in due bounds.

 

Therefore, be it

 

Resolved, That it is expedient to form a Grand Lodge in the Territory of Wisconsin.

 

On motion of Bro. John H. Rountree, the report of the committee was accepted, the preamble and resolutions adopted, and the committee discharged.

 

On motion of Bro. Dwight F. Lawton, it was

 

Ordered, That a committee of three be appointed to draft a constitution for a Grand Lodge, and that said committee be instructed to report at as early an hour as possible.

 

The Chair appointed Bros. Lawton, Meeker, and Lakin said committee.

 

The convention adjourned till 6 P.M.

 

Evening at 6 P.M. convention met.

 

Bro. Lawton, from the committee appointed to draft a constitution for a Grand Lodge, reported the draft of a constitution, which report was accepted and committee discharged.

 

On motion, the convention adjourned sine die.

 

The M.W. Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons met in annual communication in the city of Madison, on Monday, December 18, A.D.

 

1843, A.L. 5843.

 

The Grand Lodge was opened in the third degree, in due and ancient form.

 

On motion of Bro. Meeker, the constitution reported in the convention was taken up, read, and adopted.

 

Bro. Merrill, from said committee, made the following

 

REPORT.

 

The committee appointed to nominate officers for the Grand Lodge have attended to the duty assigned them, and report that they have nominated the following:

 

Benjamin T. Kavanaugh, G. Master.

 

Abram D. Sniith, D. G. Master.

 

Moses Meeker, S. G. Warden.

 

David Merrilly, J. G. Warden.

 

Thomas P. Burnett, Grand Treasurer.

 

Ben. C. Eastman, Grand Secretary.

 

Dwight F. Lawton, Grand Lecturer.

 

Which report was accepted, and the committee discharged.

 

On motion of Bro. Rountree, it was

 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge do now proceed to the election of officers, and all the above-named Brethren were elected and installed.

 

Texas

 

During the very first effort to establish a lodge in Texas, that country was a dependency of Mexico, and the Roman Catholic priesthood controlled the most of the population and were the open enemies of Freemasonry, and the American settlers were objects of suspicion.

 

In the winter of 1834-35 five Master Masons having made themselves known to each other as such, after many conferences and much deliberation, concluded to establish a lodge in Texas.

 

These were John H. Wharton, Asa Brigham, James A.E. Phelps, Alexander Russell, and Anson Jones; they fixed upon time and locality for their meeting to accomplish their desire.

 

Brother J. P. Caldwell subsequently joined them.

 

The town of Brazoria was selected for their meeting, and in a small grove of wild peach and laurel in a family burial-ground of General John Austin.

 

Here in a day of March, 1835, 10 A.M., "was held the first formal meeting of Masons in Texas." These six Brethren made arrangements to apply to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana for a dispensation to form and open a lodge to be called Holland Lodge.

 

A petition was drawn up and another Master Mason, Brother W.D.C. Hall, having signed it with the other six, it was forwarded to New Orleans.

 

The officers named were: Anson Jones, W. Master; Asa Brigham, Senior Warden, and J.P. Caldwell, Junior Warden.

 

This dispensation was granted, and Holland Lodge, No. 36, was started at Brazoria on December 27, 1835. In the second story of the old court-house was where the Communications were held.

 

In consequence of the difficulties with Mexico, which finally resulted in open hostilities, the succeeding war, and independence of the Republic of Texas, the lodge struggled on until February, 1836, the last conmmunication being held that month.

 

In March Brazoia was abandoned, and the dispensation was captured by Urrea, and with records, books, jewels, etc., was destroyed.

 

In October, 1837, the lodge was reopened in the city of Houston, a Warrant for it having been granted in the meantime, and the lodge is yet in existence.

 

Two other lodges, viz. : Milam, No. 40, at Nacogdoches, and McFarland, No. 41, at San Augustine, were warranted by the Grand Lodge of Louisiana.

 

These lodges, as also Holland Lodge, No. 36, sent delegates to a convention which met in Houston, and the Grand Lodge of the Republic at Texas was organized, December 20, 1837.

 

Brother Anson Jones was elccted Grand Master.

 

The three lodges surrendered their charters to the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, and received new charters from their own Grand Lodge.

 

Iowa

 

The first dispensation for the organization of a lodge in the Territory of Iowa was issued November 20, 1840, to Des Moines Lodge, at Burlington, which was chartered October 20, 1841.

 

The second dispensation for a lodge was issued February 4, 1841, to Iowa Lodge, at Bloomington, Muscatine County, constituted February 4, 1841, and chartered October 20, 1841, as No. 42.

 

The third dispensation was dated October 10, 1842, to Dubuque Lodge, at Dubuque, and was chartered October 10, 1843.

 

The fourth was Iowa City Lodge, at Iowa City, County of Johnson, which was constituted October 10, 1842, by dispensation, and chartered October 10, 1843.

 

These lodges all derived their warrants from the Grand Lodge of Missouri, and the present writer, as an officer in that Grand Lodge, voted for all but the first one, but was a visitor in the Grand Lodge when the first one was chartered.

 

He made the personal acquaintance of Brother Theodore S. Parvin and the other representatives of those lodges at that time, and Brother Parvin and the writer are the only surviving members of that Grand Lodge since October, 1897.

 

These four lodges, by agreement, at a preliminary convention of their delegates, held at the communication of the Grand Lodge of Missouri, at St. Louis, October 11, 1843, met in convention at Iowa City, in Iowa Territory, January 2, 1844, and then and there organized the Grand Lodge of Iowa.

 

Delegates were present from the following other lodges in Iowa working under authority of the Grand Lodge of Illinois, viz. : Rising Sun, No. 12, at Montrose, Keokuk Lodge, at Keokuk, and Clinton Lodge, at Davenport.

 

The first under a Charter and the other two under dispensations.

 

These lodges were finally admitted to the Grand Lodge of Iowa.

 

January 3, 1844, the Grand Officers were elected.

 

Brother Oliver Cock was unanimously elected on the second ballot the Grand Master, and Brother Theodore Sutton Parvin unanimously elected Grand Secretary, which office he has filled, except when he was chosen Grand Master, ever since, now fifty-five years.

 

No Mason has a more extended reputation for abilities, so essential in the management of Masonic affairs, than has our illustrious Brother, who is so favorably known throughout the world of Masonry.

 

Oregon.

 

After the organization of Multnomab Lodge at Oregon City, a little more than two years elapsed before any additional lodges were established in Oregon.

 

Following the planting of this lodge, the Grand Lodge of California, on November 27, 1850, granted a Charter to Willamette Lodge, No. 11, at Portland.

 

This lodge was opened and constituted January 4, 1851. The Grard Lodge of California granted a Charter to Lafayette Lodge, of Oregon. This lodge was constituted and began work July 30, 1851. The establishment of this lodge gave to the Territory of Oregon the requisite number of lodges, under the common law of Masonry, to organize an independent Grand Lodge for the jurisdiction.

 

The opportunity was at once improved.

 

"The important question," says a distinguished Brother, recently deceased, "of having a Grand Lodge was agitated.

 

Consequently, on the 16th of August, A.L. 5851, A.D 1851, a convention of F. & A.

 

Masons of the Territory of Oregon was held at Oregon City to form a Grand Lodge.

 

Brother Berryman Jennings was elected Chairman and Bro. Benjamin Stark Secretary." The convention, after due consideration, resolved upon the wisdom and expediency of the "formation of a Grand Lodge." In pursuance of this action an address, giving official notice of the purpose in view, was prepared and sent out to the several lodges, requesting them to meet again in convention on the second Saturday in September following, to perfect the Grand Lodge organization.

 

In pursuance of this call, delegates from the several lodges assembled at Oregon City on September 13, 1851, and proceeded to the work in hand by the election of Bro.

 

John Elliott Chairman, and Bro. W.S. Caldwell Secretary.

 

The three lodges, viz. : Multonomah, Willamette, and La Fayette, were duly represented.

 

Among the delegates present were those who were otherwise admitted to seats in the convention, viz. : Bros.

 

J.C. Ainsworth, R.R.

 

Thompson, Forbes Barclay, John Elliott, Lewis May, Benj.

 

Stark, Wm.M. Berry, D.D. Garrett, G.B. Coudy, B. Jennings, Robert Thompson, Amory Holbrook, and W.S. Caldwell.

 

On Monday, September 15th following, a constitution, through a committee, was reported and adopted, and the Grand Lodge of Oregon duly organized.

 

Bro.

 

Berryman Jennings was elected and installed Grand Master, and Bro.

 

Benj. Stark Grand Secretary.

 

The first lodge established under authority of the Grand Lodge of Oregon was organized at Salem, under the name of Salem Lodge, No.

 

4. The dispensation of this lodge was issued by the Deputy Grand Master, R.W. Bro. John Elliott, on October 4, 1851.

 

California.

 

The Grand Lodge of California was organized in the city of Sacramento, April 18, 1850.

 

The constituent lodges were California Lodge, No. 13, chartered by the Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia, located in San Francisco, November 9, 1848; Connecticut Lodge, No. 75, Sacramento City, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Connecticut, January 31, 1849; and Western Star Lodge, No. 98, from the Grand Lodge of Missouri, May 10, 1848; Benton City, Upper California.

 

Delegates were present from New Jersey Lodge, under dispensation from the Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of New jersey, dated March 1, 1849.

 

This lodge was opened in Sacramento City, December 4, 1849.

 

Credentials were presented by B.D. Hyam, from Benicia Lodge, at Benicia, but there being no dispensation or Charter or any other information of the existence of such a lodge, it was not recognized.

 

A constitution was adopted April 19th, and the Grand Officers were elected and duly installed.

 

Minnesota.

 

The first lodge organized in Minnesota was St. Paul's, No. 1, constituted by the Grand Lodge of Ohio, August 4, 1849; the second lodge was St. John's, No. 1, warranted October 12, 1850, by the Grand Lodge of Wisconsin; and the third was Cataract Lodge, No 168, founded by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, 1852.

 

These three lodges, by delegates, met in convention at the city of St. Paul, February 23, 1853, and constituted the Grand Lodge of the State of Minnesota.

 

New Mexico.

 

The Grand Lodge of Missouri issued warrants to the following lodges in New Mexico, viz. : Aztec Lodge, No. 108; Chapman Lodge, No. 95; and Montezuma Lodge, No. 109.

 

These lodges met in convention, August 6, 1877, at Santa Fe, for the purpose of discussing the question of forming a Grand Lodge.

 

Brother Simon B. Newcomb presided.

 

The committee on credentials found the representatives of the three above-mentioned lodges to be present.

 

The next day a constitution and by-laws were adopted, the Grand Officers were elected and installed, Brother Wm. W. Griffin being M.W. Grand Master, and David J. Miller R. W. Grand Secretary.

 

Washington.

 

The first steps of initiatory efforts toward Masonic organization and the formation of a Masonic lodge on the Pacific Coast, so far as any record has been shown or it is believed to exist, were taken jointly by three brother Master Masons, namely: Bros.

 

Joseph Hull, William P. Dougherty, and Peter G. Stewart.

 

A petition was prepared and addressed to the Grand Lodge of Missouri praying that a Charter be granted to the petitioners, under the name of Multnomah Lodge.

 

The record of the Grand Lodge of Missouri reads as follows: "A charter was granted to Multnomah Lodge, No. 84, on the 19th day of October, 1846, locating the Lodge at Oregon City, Oregon Territory."

 

In his annual address to the Grand Lodge of Oregon, held June 13, 1853, M.W. Bro. Berryman Jennings, Grand Master, says:

 

"On the 25th day of November (1852) last, I granted a dispensation to sundry brethren residing at Olympia, Puget Sound, to open a Lodge under the name of Olympia Lodge, returnable at this Grand Communication, which return has been promptly made, through their Worshipful Master, Brother T.F. McElroy." Washington Territory was not organized until after this dispensation was issued and the lodge began work.

 

 

 

On Saturday evening, December 11, 1852, Olympia Lodge, U.D., held its first communication by virtue of Grand Lodge authority, and was thereunder duly organized, the following officers, members and Brethren being present, viz. : Bros.

 

Thornton F. McElroy, W.M., James W. Wiley, S.W., and Michael T. Simmons, S.W.; also Bros.

 

Smith Hays and Nicholas Delin of the original petitioners (Bros.

 

Ira Ward and A.K. Skidmore of said petitioners being absent); Bros.

 

Fred A. Clark and Calvin H. Hale, visitors, were also present.

 

The Charter was granted to Olympia Lodge of Oregon, June 13th, and bears date June 15, 1853, and was designated as Olympia Lodge of Oregon, No. 5, of that grand jurisdiction.

 

The first meeting under the Charter was held on Saturday evening, July 24, 1853, at which time we may infer the lodge was regularly constituted, although the record is silent in this particular.

 

An election, however, was held that evening for new officers under the Charter, with the following result: Bros. T.F. McElroy, W.M.; B.F. Yantis, S. W.; M.T. Simmons, J.W.; B. Close, Sec.; Ira Ward, Treas., and Smith Hays, Tyler.

 

This was the first lodge established and constituted north of the Columbia River and west of the Rocky Mountains.

 

The records of Multnomah Lodge from its institution until 1868 were destroyed by fire, and the oldest record is the ledger dating from the year 1854.

 

Steilacoom Lodge, the second lodge established within the present jurisdictional limits of Washington, was organized U.D. in the year 1854. Since it first began work it has passed through several trying ordeals, some of which were of so serious a nature that its existence might well have been regarded as hopeless but for the pluck and Masonic energy of its membership.

 

The records of the Grand Lodge of Oregon, session of June, 1854, show that R.W. Dep. Grand Master J.C. Ainsworth, acting Grand Master, "granted a Dispensation to Brother W. H. Wallace and others to open a Lodge at Steilacoom, Washington Territory, under the name of Steilacoom Lodge."

 

The dispensation must have been granted during the latter part of January or some time in February, 1855.

 

During the summer or fall Of 1857, probably about September 1st, M.W.Bro. Ben. J. Stark, G.M. of Masons of Oregon, issued a dispensation for a new lodge at Grand Mound, Thurston County, Washington, named Grand Mound Lodge.

 

This lodge was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Oregon, July 12, or 15, 1858, under the name of Grand Mound Lodge, No. 21. On August 21, 1858, at its hall on Grand Mound Prairie, the lodge was duly constituted and its officers installed.

 

On September 19, 1868, after eleven years of hard struggling, in earnest and zealous efforts to build up and sustain the lodge, the Brethren reluctantly felt it a duty to themselves and the Fraternity to surrender the Charter to the Grand Lodge.

 

In the annual address of M. W. Grand Master Benjamin J. Stark to the Grand Lodge of Oregon, July 13, 1858, among the seven dispensations he reported having granted during the year for the formation of new lodges is one "for Washington Territory."

 

On July 13, 1858, a Charter was granted by the Grand Lodge of Oregon to Washington Lodge, No. 22.

 

The Charter bears date the same as that of Grand Mound Lodge, namely, July 15, 1858.

 

In the foregoing references to the organization, severally, of Olympia, Steilacoom, Grand Mound, and Washington lodges, we find that they were the first organized Masonic bodies north of Columbia River.

 

On Monday, December 6, 1858, a little band of Freemasons, about one dozen in number, met at the Masonic hall, in the city of Olympia, Washington Territory.

 

Their declaration of purpose was to consider "the propriety of establishing a Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for said Territory."

 

This little band of Brethren in convention assembled resolved to proceed to the formation and organization of a Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons for the Territory of Washington.

 

The convention was composed of delegates representing the four existing lodges in the Territory, viz. : Olympia Lodge, No. 5; Steilacoom Lodge, No. 8; Grand Mound Lodge, No. 21, and Washington Lodge, No. 22, together with all Past Masters by service, who were members of these lodges, and present during the sessions of the convention.

 

On the evening of Dcccmber 8, 1858, a constitution, having been prepared by a committee appointed for that purpose, was submitted, duly considered and adopted, after which the Grand Officers were elected.

 

 

 

The convention, having completed its labors, was adjourned, sine die, on the morning of December 9th, whereupon the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the Territory of Washington was opened in ample form, and was thus launched upon the sea of its sovereign existence.

 

The business transacted at this first session, though comparatively brief, was most important to the future interest and zeal of the Grand Lodge.

 

It related chiefly to formulating plans and adopting methods for placing the "machinery of Grand Lodge in Order," in furtherance of the important work before it.

 

We are indebted to the history of the Grand Lodge of Washington, by Bro. Grand Secretary Thomas M. Read, for the above sketch.

 

Kansas

 

By reference to the proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Missouri the record will be found of the organization of the first three lodges in Kansas.

 

Dispensations for the formation of new lodges were issued:

 

August 4, 1854, to John W. Chivington and others, to open a lodge at the house of Mathew R. Walker, in Wyandotte Territory, to be called Kansas Lodge, by order of Most Worshipful Grand Master L.S.

 

Cornwell.

 

October 6, 1854, to John W. Smith and others, to open a lodge at the town of Smithfield, Kansas Territory, to be called Smithfield Lodge, by order of R.W.N.B. Giddings, D.D.G. Master First Masonic District of Missouri.

 

December 30, 1854, to Richard R. Rees and others, to open a lodge at the town of Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, by order of R.W.D.P.

 

Wallingford, D.G. Master of Missouri. (1)

 

At a meeting of delegates from several Masonic lodges in the Territory of Kansas, at the city of Leavenworth, on November 14, A.D. 1855, A.L. 5855.

 

Present : Bro. William P. Richardson of Smithton Lodge, No. 140, as proxy for W.M. Richard R. Rees, W.M. of Leavenworth Lodge, No. 150, and Bro. A. Payney, S.W. of Leavenworth Lodge, No. 150.

 

On motion of Bro. Rees, Bro. William P, Richardson was called to the Chair, and on motion, Bro. R.R. Rees acted as Secretary.

 

Bro. Rees moved, that as Wyandotte Lodge was not represented in this convention, that the convention adjourn until December 27th next, with a request that all the chartered lodges be represented; which motion was carried, and the convention adjourned.

 

The convention met in the office of A. and R.R. Rees, in the city of Leavenworth, pursuant to adjournment, December 27, 1855.

 

Present: Bro. John W. Smith, W. M. of Smithton Lodge, No. 140; Bro.

 

R.R. Rees, W.M. of Leavenworth Lodge, No. 150; and Bros. C.T.

 

Harrison, L.J. Eastin, J.J. Clarkson, G.W. Perkins, I.B. Donaldson, and Brother Kohn, Master Masons.

 

Bro. J.W. Smith was called to the Chair, Bro. Rees acting as Secretary.

 

(1) Proceedings of Grand Lodge of Missouri, 1855, pp. 64, 65.

 

Bro. Rees offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted:

 

Resolved, That we do proceed to organize a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Kansas, and that a copy of the proceedings of this convention be forwarded to Wyandotte Lodge with a request that they cooperate with us, and approve the proceedings of this convention; and that so soon as Wyandotte shall inform the Grand Master elect of their approval, and cooperation in the proceedings of this convention, that then, the Grand Master elect shall be installed as Grand Master and immediately issue a proclamation declaring this Grand Lodge fully organized.

 

On motion of Bro. Rees, the Chair appointed a committee of three to report a constitution and by-laws for the government of this Grand Lodge, which committee consisted of Bros. Rees, Eastin, and Harrison.

 

The committee appointed to report a constitution and code of bylaws made their report, which was adopted.

 

On motion of Bro. Rees, the convention adjourned, to meet at Masonic hall at early candle-light.

 

On motion of Bro. Rees, the constitution and by-laws adopted in convention are unanimously adopted as the constitution and by-laws of this Grand Lodge.

 

 

 

The Grand Lodge thereupon proceeded to the election of Grand Officers, which resulted in the election of Bro. Richard R. Rees as M.W.G.M.

 

On motion of Bro. Vanderslice, a committee consisting of Bros.

 

Vanderslice, Walker, and Smith was appointed to report a constitution and code of bylaws for the government of this Grand Lodge.

 

The Grand Lodge was called from labor to refreshments until 7.30 P.M.

 

A committee appointed by the Grand Lodge of Kansas, at their convention held at Leavenworth City, on Monday, March 17, 1856, reported a constitution and by-laws for the government of said Grand Lodge which was adopted.

 

The Grand Lodge then proceeded to the election of Grand Officers for the ensuing year, which resulted in the election of Bro.

 

Richard R. Rees, Grand Master, who was then installed and who then installed all the other officers.

 

Nebraska.

 

The first lodge in the State of Nebraska was Nebraska Lodge, No.

 

184, at Belleville, Sarpy County, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Illinois, October 3, 1855.

 

The second lodge was Giddings Lodge, No. 156, at Nebraska City, Otoe County, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Missouri, May 28, 1856.

 

The third lodge was Capitol Lodge, No. 101, at Omaha City, Douglas County, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Iowa, June 3, 1857.

 

These three lodges, by their delegates, held a convention at Omaha City, September 23, 1857, and resolved to organize a Grand Lodge for the Territory of Nebraska.

 

The Grand Officers were elected, Bro. Robert C. Jordan being chosen Grand Master, who held that station until 1860.

 

We regret to record here that this "father of Nebraska Masonry" died January 9, 1899, aged seventy-four years.

 

Before closing this history of Nebraska, intelligence was received of the sad ending of the life of another distinguished brother, William R. Bowen, the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge, Grand Chapter, and Grand Recorder of the Grand Commandery, who, like Brother Jordan, had been called the father of Nebraska Masonry.

 

These remarks are due, because of the writer's personal knowledge of, and intimate association with, both of these Brethren, not only in the above grand bodies, but also in the Supreme Council of the A.'.A.'.A.'.S.'. Rite, of which Bro.'.Jordan was the Active Member for Nebraska up to the date of his death, and Bro.'.Bowen was an Emeritus, having retired from the Active list several years since.

 

Indian Territory.

 

The first lodge organized in the Indian Territory was Flint Lodge, in the "Cherokee Nation," which received a Charter from the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, dated November 9, 1853.

 

The second lodge was called Muskogee, and subsequently named Eufala, in the "Creek Nation," and received a dispensation, supposedly, from the Grand Master of Arkansas in 1855; and a Charter was granted, November 7, 1855.

 

During the war of 1861-65 it ceased its labors, and its Charter was arrested November 6, 1867.

 

Early in 1874 the Grand Master of Arkansas revived the lodge; it remained on the registry of that Grand Lodge nearly two years, until that Grand Lodge recognized the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory.

 

Doaksville Lodge received a dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, December 23, 1870, and was chartered November 8, 1871. Caddo Lodge received a dispensation, August 26, 1873, from the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, and was chartered October 14, 1873.

 

These two were in the "Choctaw Nation."

 

Muskogee, Doaksville, and Caddo lodges met in convention, by their delegates, October 5, 1874, and decided to form a Grand Lodge for the Indian Territory. A constitution was adopted, Grand Officers were chosen and installed, and the Grand Lodge was constituted, October 6, 1874.

 

Three other lodges were in existence when the Grand Lodge was constituted, viz. : Oklahoma, in the "Choctaw Nation," which had been chartered by the Grand Lodge of Arkansas, November 18, 1868.

 

This lodge, as soon as the Grand Lodge was started, sent in her Charter and had it endorsed; it then came under that constitution.

 

Flint Lodge, already described, and Alpha Lodge, also in the "Cherokee Nation," which had received a dispensation from Kansas, May 18, 1872, and a Charter, October 17, 1872, declined joining the New Grand Lodge, and adhered to the Grand Lodges from which they had received their warrants.

 

The Grand Lodges of Arkansas and Kansas for some time refused to recognize the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory.

 

In 1876 the latter Grand Lodge arrested the charters of the two delinquent lodges.

 

The Grand Lodge of Kansas sustained her daughter lodge and still refused to acknowledge the New Grand Lodge.

 

The issue continued until the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory rescinded her action of 1876.

 

Soon thereafter Flint Lodge surrendered, and Alpha Lodge followed her in October, 1878, after the desired action of the Grand Lodge of Kansas had been obtained.

 

 

 

Other lodges subsequently had been chartered by the New Grand Lodge - two in the Cherokee, two in the Choctaw, and two in the Chickasaw nations.

 

Colorado.

 

The first lodges in Colorado were Golden City Lodge, at Golden City, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Kansas, October 17, 1860; Summit Lodge, at Parkville, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, June 5, 1861; and Rocky Mountain Lodge, at Gold Hill,

 

June 5, 1861, by the same Grand Lodge.

 

August 2, 1861, the above-mentioned lodges met, by their delegates, in convention at Golden City.

 

They elected and installed their Grand Officers and constituted the Grand Lodge of Colorado, and declared it to be regularly organized.

 

A constitution was adopted.

 

The Grand Lodge of Kansas, October 15, 1867, chartered Nevada Lodge, in Colorado, it seems without the knowledge of the formation of the Grand Lodge of Colorado. (How this could lave occurred we can scarcely conceive, as six years had elapsed.) This lodge, not having done any Masonic work under the Charter, was permitted to surrender the Charter and take anew one from the Grand Lodge of Colorado.

 

Nevada.

 

Carson Lodge, at Carson City, was chartered May 15, 1862; Washoe Lodge, at Washoe City, and Virginia City Lodge, at Virginia City; both chartered May 14, 1863; Silver City Lodge, changed afterward to Amity, at Silver City, chartered May 15 1863; Silver Star Lodge, at Gold Hill, Esmeralda Lodge, at Aurora, and Escurial Lodge, at Virginia, all three chartered October 13, 1864; and Lander Lodge, at Austin, chartered October 14, 1864. All of these eight lodges recoved their charters from the Grand Lodge of California.

 

A convention was called to meet January 16, 1865, which was accordingly done and six lodges were represented the first day; the next day another lodge was represented.

 

Lander Lodge, of the above list, was the only lodge which did not appear in the convention.

 

A constitution was adopted. The Grand Officers were elected and installed January 17, 1865.

 

The old charters were endorsed for present use. Lander Lodge, although unrepresented in the convention and organization, presumed herself to be a part of the Grand Lodge, and under its jurisdiction made the returns to the Grand Lodge with the other lodges.

 

The first annual grand communication was held October 10, 1865.

 

Dakota.

 

The first lodge organized in Dakota was St. John's Lodge, at Yankton, which received from the Grand Lodge of Iowa, December 5, 1862, a dispensation, and afterward a Charter, dated June 3, 1863; Incense Lodge, at Vermillion, received a dispensation, January 14, 1869, and a Charter, June 2, 1869; Elk Point Lodge, at Elk Point, received a dispensation, March 23, 1870, and a Charter, June 8, 1871; Minnehaha Lodge, at Sioux Falls, received a dispensation, July 13, 1873, and a Charter, June 3, 1874; Silver Star Lodge, at Canton, received a dispensation, February 6, 1875, and a Charter, June 2, 1875; and Mount Zion Lodge, at Springfield, received a dispensation, February 16, 1875, and a Charter, June 2, 1875. All of the above warrants were granted by authority of the Grand Lodge of Iowa.

 

A dispensation was issued by the Grand Master of Minnesota, November 22, 1872, for Shiloh Lodge, at Fargo, and a Charter was issued January 14, 1874.

 

He also issued a dispensation to Bismarck Lodge in 1874, and again in 1875, and on January 12, 1876, the lodge received a Charter.

 

June 21, 1875, a convention was held of the representatives of St.

 

John's, Incense, Elk Point, Minnehaha, and Silver Star lodges.

 

Those of Mt. Zion Lodge, U.D., were present but did not participate in the proceedings, the lodge not having a Charter. A constitution was adopted and they elected their Grand Officers.

 

July 21, 1875, convention met again and the Grand Officers were installed in public, by Illustrious Brother Theodore S. Parvin, P.G. Master and Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Iowa.

 

This Grand Lodge continued until the session of June 11-13, 1889, when by Act of Congress, approved February 22, 1889, the division of the Territory of Dakota into North and South Dakota was likely to be accomplished within a few months.

 

The report of a committee on division of the Grand Lodge was adopted, and certain lodges located in North Dakota were permitted to organize a Grand Lodge of North Dakota, which will be stated under that designation.

 

The name of "Dakota" was changed to "South Dakota" at the sixteenth communication of the Grand Lodge, held June 10, 1890, in Madison.

 

South Dakota is the designation of the original Grand Lodge of Dakota.

 

North Dakota.

 

So soon as it was determined by the Grand Lodge of Dakota, at its session, held June 11-13, 1889, that there should be a division of the Grand Lodge of Dakota to correspond with the political division of the Territory into North and South Dakota, a convention was held, June 12, 1889, at the city of Mitchell, where the Grand Lodge was in session, and the following lodges of North Dakota were represented, viz. :

 

Shiloh, No. 8; Pembina, No. 10; Casselton, No. 12; Acacia, No. 15; Bismarck, No. 16; Jamestown, No. 19; Valley City, No. 21; Mandan, No. 23; Cereal, No. 29; Hillsboro, No. 32; Crescent, No. 36; Cheyenne Valley, No. 41; Ellendale, No. 49; Sanborn, No. 51; Wahpeton, No. 58; North Star, No. 59; Minto, No. 60; Mackey, No.

 

63; Goase River, No. 64; Hiram, No. 74; Minnewaukan, No. 75; Tongue River, NO. 78; Bathgate, No. 80; Euclid, No. 84; Anchor, No. 88; Golden Valley, No. 90; Occidental, No. 99.

 

The convention resolved that it was expedient to organize a Grand Lodge for North Dakota.

 

A constitution and by-laws were adopted.

 

June 13th, the first session of the Grand Lodge was held in the city of Mitchell.

 

The elected and appointed officers were present and representatives of the above twenty lodges.

 

The Grand Lodge of North Dakota has continued to keep pace with the other Western Grand Lodges.

 

Idaho

 

In 1863 a meeting of Masons was held in Idaho City, Boise County, and it was resolved to apply to the Grand Master of Oregon for a dispensation to organize a lodge, which was granted July 7, 1863, and on June 21, 1864, a charter was granted to Idaho Lodge, No. 35.

 

The next lodge was in Boise City, No. 37, April 1, 1865, under dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Oregon.

 

At a communication held in June, 1865, it was resolved to apply for a Charter, which was granted to Boise City Lodge, No. 37, June 20, 1865.

 

Placer Lodge, No. 38, was the third lodge organized under Warrant from the Grand Lodge of Oregon, June 20, 1865. Pioneer Lodge, No. 12, recoved her Warrant from the Grand Lodge of the Territory of Washington, June 7, 1867. Owyhee Lodge received a dispensation from the Grand Lodge of Oregon, July 21, 1866.

 

The above four chartered lodges held a Convention in Idaho City, December 16, 1867.

 

Owyhee Lodge, U.D., from courtesy, was admitted and permitted to vote. The convention decided to organize a Grand Lodge.

 

December 17, 1867, a full corps of Grand Officers was elected and installed.

 

Constitution of Grand Lodge of Oregon was adopted temporarily.

 

December 17th, Grand Lodge was opened in ample form and so has continued to present time. (1)

 

Montana.

 

At the burial of a Mason in the Territory of Montana was the first gathering of Masons, which led to an effort to organize a lodge by an application to the Grand Master of Nebraska, who issued a dispensation, April 27, 1863, to form a lodge at Bannock, which was in Dakota, but supposed to be in Idaho.

 

This dispensation was renewed on June 24, 1863, and authorized again on June 24, 1864, and finally, when it arrived at the place, the members had been dispersed by removal of residence and no lodge was ever opened.

 

The lodge Virginia City, No. 43, received a Charter dated December 26, 1864, from the Grand Lodge of Kansas.

 

A dispensation was received from the Grand Lodge of Colorado dated April 4, 1865, for Montana Lodge, No. 9, at Virginia City.

 

Helena Lodge, No. 10, received a dispensation from the same Grand Lodge and was organized August 17, 1865.

 

Both of these lodges received charters granted November 7, 1865, from the Grand Lodge of Colorado.

 

A convention of the representatives of the above lodges was held January 24, 1866.

 

After proper investigation as to the membership

 

(1) From proceedings of Grand Lodge of Idaho, September, 1883.

 

 

 

of the convention, it was decided to form a Grand Lodge and the convention closed.

 

The officers of the three lodges then opened a Grand Lodge in due form.

 

A constitution was adopted and the Grand Officers were elected.

 

January 26, 1866, the Grand Officers were regularly installed and at the same time charters were issued to the lodges and returns were made of one hundred and five members.

 

West Virginia.

 

 

 

In consequence of the Civil War, from 1861 to 1865 the affairs of Masonry, in common with all civil matters in Virginia and West Virginia, which latter had been separated from the parent State, were in utter confusion.

 

Many of the lodges, in West Virginia had ceased to meet, some had lost their charters and other properties.

 

After due consideration of the condition of things, in response to a circular from Fairmont Lodge, No. 9, which had heen sent throughout the State, a convention was held, December 28, 1863, at Grafton, which was held during a period of great excitement, in consequence of some of the delegates having been prevented from attending, by the movements of the war having again disturbed the condition of the State.

 

After two adjournments the convention finally met, June 24, 1864, in Fairmont.

 

Eight of the working lodges out of thirteen in the State were represented.

 

Grand Officers were elected and a day selected for their installation, but as the convention adjourned sine die the Grand Officers decided that no further action could be had under a misapprehension of an informality in their proceedings.

 

A new convention was called to meet April 12, 1865.

 

The lodges represented were those at the prior convention, and were as follows, viz.: Wellsburg, No. 108; Wheeling, No. 128; Ohio, No.

 

101; Marshall Union, No. 37; Cameron, No. 180; Morgantown, No. 93; Fairmont, No. 9; Fetterman, No. 170.

 

Grand Officers were again elected, and May 10th (1) selected for their installation.

 

The convention met on that day.

 

One other lodge, Mt. Olivet, No. 113, in addition to the eight, was represented, The convention closed and a Grand Lodge was opened.

 

The Grand Officers were installed.

 

The old charters were ordered to be endorsed

 

(1) The record, page 13, says 11th, which is an error.

 

 

 

under the seal of the Grand Lodge, and to be retained until new ones could be prepared and issued.

 

Utah.

 

"Through much tribulation ye shall enter into" - Masonry.

 

A dispensation was issued, February 4, 1866, by the Grand Master of Nevada for the organization of Mt. Moriah Lodge at Salt Lake City.

 

The lodge duly organized, but very soon the treatment by one of the lodges of Masons of the Mormon faith became an issue, which was submitted to the Grand Master of Nevada, who accordingly issued an edict forbidding the admission, as visitors and the affiliation, of Mormons claiming to be Masons; and also the reception of their petitions for the degrees.

 

The lodge demurred to this decree, but submitted to the order of the Grand Master.

 

A petition, however, was sent to the Grand Master to modify the decree, so that Mormons not polygamists would be exempted from the decree.

 

The dispensation of the lodge was returned, and a Charter asked for.

 

The Grand Lodge approved of the edict of the Grand Master, and, declining to grant a Charter, renewed the dispensation.

 

The lodge, although "worse than sorrow-stricken," still continued to work for another year.

 

The lodge then petitioned for a Charter, with the condition that if they could not have a Charter unrestricted by the edict, they declined having a Charter.

 

The surrender of the dispensation was promptly accepted by the Grand Lodge.

 

The members then presented their petition to the Grand Lodge of Montana, October 8, 1887, with a statement of the circumstances of their relation with the Grand Lodge of Nevada.

 

The Grand Lodge of Montana declared, that the assumption of the petitions that the Grand Lodge of Nevada did not possess the power to decide who are not proper persons to be admitted into its subordinate lodges, was "subversive of the principles of Masonry." The petition for a Charter was rejected, and they were referred to the Grand Lodge of Nevada for a redress of their alleged grievances.

 

The lodge applied then to the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Kansas, who issued a dispensation, November 25, 1867, and on October 21, 1868, a Charter was granted by the Grand Lodge.

 

A convention was held at Salt Lake City, January 16, 1872, by the representatives of the three lodges located in that city, viz.:

 

Wasatch Lodge, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Montana, October 7, 1867; Mount Moriah Lodge, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Kansas, October 21, 1868; Argenta Lodge, chartered by the Grand Lodge of Colorado, September 26, 1871.

 

It was decided, by unanimous vote, to organize a Grand Lodge for Utah.

 

The Grand Officers were chosen and installed, and the Grand Lodge was duly constituted.

 

In consequence of the Mormon Church being in their midst, difficulties at once arose in one of the lodges.

 

A member joined the Mormons, and upon trial by regular process he was expelled, and the Grand Lodge affirmed the expulsion.

 

This matter drew the attention of other Grand Lodges, who took formal action upon it; and the course of the Grand Lodge of Utah was nearly, if not unanimously, sustained.

 

Arizona.

 

Aztlan Lodge, at Prescott, was chartered by the Grand Lodge of California, October 11, 1866; which also chartered Arizona Lodge, No. 257, at Phoenix, October 16, 1879, and Tucson Lodge, No. 263, at Tucson, October 15, 1881.

 

A dispensation was issued to Solomon Lodge, at Tombstone, June 4, 1881, which was continued at the next communication of the Grand Lodge of California, October 1, 1882.

 

White Mountain Lodge, No. 5, at Globe, received a Charter from the Grand Lodge of New Mexico dated January 18, 1881.

 

The representatives of Arizona Lodge, No. 257, Tucson Lodge, No.

 

263, and White Mountain Lodge, No. 5, held a convention, March 23, 1882, at Tucson, and the representatives of Solomon Lodge, U.D., were invited "to take part in the deliberations of the Convention." The convention adopted a constitution.

 

A lodge of Master Masons was then opened, and the Grand Officers were elected.

 

On March 25th the Grand Officers were installed and the convention closed, and the Grand Lodge was duly opened. The charters of the lodges were properly endorsed and returned to them as the authority under which they continued their existence.

 

Solomon Lodge, U.D., received her Charter under the name of King Solomon, No. 5. Aztlan Lodge had her Charter endorsed, and she made her returns.

 

These five lodges had a membership of two hundred and seventy-four.

 

Wyoming

 

Cheyenne Lodge, No. 16, at Cheyenne, was chartered by the Grand Lodge of Colorado, October 7, 1868.

 

Laramie Lodge, No. 18, at Laramie City, received a dispensation from the same Grand Lodge, January 31, 1870, and a Charter, September 28, 1870.

 

Evanston Lodge, No. 24, at Evanston, recoved a dispensation from the same Grand Lodge, September 8, 1873, and a Charter, September 30, 1874.

 

Wyoming Lodge, No. 28, at South Pass City, had a dispensation issued to her by the Grand Lodge of Nebraska, November 20, 1869, and a Charter, June 23, 1870.

 

The representatives of these four lodges met in convention December 15, 1874, at Laramie City, and proceeded to organize a Grand Lodge for Wyoming by adopting a constitution, electing and installing their Grand Officers on the 16th.

 

The four lodges then had a membership of two hundred and fifty.

 

The first annual communication was held October 12, 1875, and the Grand Lodge has continued to hold its annual communications, and from the tabular statement at the conclusion of this chapter will be found the number of members.

 

Oklahoma.

 

At the eighteenth annual communication of the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory, under which Grand Lodge all the then existing lodges in Oklahoma Territory held their lodge warrants, a paper was presented to the Grand Lodge from the "members and representatives of the various Lodges of Masons in the Territory of Oklahoma organized and bring within the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Indian Territory, respectfully ask your consent and the consent of said Grand Lodge to the formation and organization by the said Oklahoma Lodges of a separate and independent Grand Lodge within and for said Oklahoma Territory to be known as the 'Grand Lodge of Oklahoma' and to have and possess hereafter exclusive Masonic jurisdiction and authority as the Grand Lodge within and for the said Territory of Oklahoma.

 

"Dated at Tahlequah, I.T., August 16, 1892."

 

This was signed by the representatives of the following lodges: Guthrie Lodge, No. 35; North Canadian Lodge, No. 36; Edmond Lodge, No. 37.

 

This was referred to a committee, and upon a favorable report, the petition was granted and suitable arrangements were made for holding a convention of all the lodges in the new Territory, at which the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge was to preside and install the newly elected Grand Officers and formally proclaim by authority of that Grand Lodge "that the Grand Lodge of Oklahoma is legally organized," etc.

 

On motion of Rev. Bro. R.W. Hill the Grand Lodge unanimously voted a set of Grand Lodge jewels to the new Grand Lodge.

 

We have not been able to get a copy of the proceedings of the convention which was held November 10, 1892, but have before us the proceedings of the first annual communication held at El Reno, Oklahoma Territory, February 14, 1893, when there were represented the following lodges, viz. :

 

Anadarko, No. 1, at Oklahoma City; Guthrie, No. 2, at Guthrie; Oklahoma, No. 3, at Oklahoma City; Edmond No. 4, at Edmond; Norman, No. 5, at Norman; Frontier, No. 6, at Stillwater; El Reno, No. 7, at El Reno; Kingfisher, No. 8, at Kingfisher; Coronado, No. 9, at Hennessy; Chandler, No. 10, at Chandler; Crescent, No. 11, at Crescent City; Mulhall, U.D., at Mulhall.

 

 

 

Alaska

 

We have received the information that the Grand Master of Washington Territory issued a dispensation for a lodge to be organized in Sitka, Alaska, April 14, 1868.

 

This dispensation was continued September 17, 1868, and finally revoked October 18, 1872.

 

We have no further information as to any lodges since that time.

 

There is no doubt that very soon lodges will be formed in several of the new towns which have sprung up in the gold regions, so soon as the population shall have become more stable and permanently settled.

 

 

 

TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF GRAND LODGES IN THE UNITED STATES; AND NUMBER OF MEMBERS IN EACH, FOR THE YEAR 1908.

 

 

 

No. Names of Grand Lodges

 

Date

 

of

 

Formation.

 

 

 

Membership.

 

1

 

Alabama

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 14, 1821.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19,966 2

 

Arizona

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 25, 1882

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,394 3

 

Arkansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 22, 1832

 

 

 

 

 

18,293 4

 

California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 18, 1850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36,126 5

 

Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 2, 1861

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12,226 6

 

Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 8, 1789

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,752

 

 

 

Dakota Territory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 21, 1875

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extinct.

 

7

 

Delaware

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 6, 1806

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,888 8

 

District of Columbia

 

 

 

December 11,1810

 

 

 

 

 

7,999 9

 

Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 6, 1830

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,228 10

 

Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 16, 1786

 

 

 

28,420 11

 

Idaho

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 17, 1867

 

 

 

 

 

2,395 12

 

Illinois

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 6, 1840

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

85,683 13

 

Indiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 13, 1818

 

 

 

 

 

47,353 14

 

Indian Territory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 6, 1874

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,476 15

 

Iowa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2, 1844

 

 

 

 

 

37,838 16

 

Kansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 17, 1856

 

 

 

 

 

28,764 17

 

Kentucky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 16, 1800

 

 

 

 

 

30,600 18

 

Louisiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 11, 1812

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,584 19

 

Maine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 1, 1820

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26,530 20

 

Maryland

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 17, 1787

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12,310 21

 

Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 30, 1733

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

51,825 22

 

Michigan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 24, 1826

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56,010 23

 

Minnesota

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 23, 1853

 

 

 

 

 

22,014 24

 

Mississippi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 27, 1818

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,371 25

 

Missouri

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 23, 1821

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45,348 26

 

Montana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 26, 1866

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,421 27

 

Nebraska

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 23, 1857

 

 

 

15,728 28

 

Nevada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 17, 1865

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,241 29

 

New Hampshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 8, 1789

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9,727 30

 

New jersey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 18, 1786

 

 

 

26,595 31

 

New Mexico

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 7, 1877

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,590 32

 

New York

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 5, 1781

 

 

 

152,928 33

 

North Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 9, 1787

 

 

 

 

 

16,835 34

 

North Dakota

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 13, 1889

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,945 35

 

Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 5, 1809

 

 

 

 

 

68,679 36

 

Oklahoma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October, 1892

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,978 37

 

Oregon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 16, 1851

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,085 38

 

Pennsylvania

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 26, 1786

 

 

 

75,273 39

 

Rhode Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 21, 1791

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,719 40

 

South Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 5, 1787

 

 

 

 

 

10,403 41

 

South Dakota

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 21, 1875

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,675 42

 

Tennessee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 27, 1813

 

 

 

 

 

20,986 43

 

Texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 20, 1837

 

 

 

 

 

41,736 44

 

Utah

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 1, 1872

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,343 45

 

Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 15, 1794

 

 

 

 

 

12,078 46

 

Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 13, 1777

 

 

 

 

 

17,644 47

 

Washington

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 8, 1858

 

 

 

 

 

10,903 48

 

West Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 11, 1865

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,778 49

 

Wisconsin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 18, 1843

 

 

 

 

 

22,974 50

 

Wyoming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 5, 1874.....

 

 

 

2,102

 


 

 

P. 1486


 

CHAPTER LVI

 

HISTORY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF FREEMASONRY INTO EACH STATE AND TERRITORY OF THE UNITED STATES

 

Royal Arch Masonry.

 

ON Chapter XLIX., Dr. A. G. Mackey, having, in a very elaborate and satisfactory manner, given the history of the introduction of Royal Arch Masonry into America; and in Chapter L., the organization of the General Grand Chapter in the United States, it is quite unnecessary for the present writer to make any preface to the details of the organization of the particular Chapters and the Grand Chapters in the several Grand jurisdictions.

 

We shall, therefore, proceed at once to that work, and in an alphabetical arrangement, for a better reference to any special jurisdiction when required.

 

Alabama.

 

Prior to May, 1823, there were four chapters in Alabama having been chartered by the General Grand Chapter.

 

A convention of the delegates of these chapters was held in Mobile in May and June, 1823, and it was decided to form a Grand Chapter for the State.

 

The junior Chapter, Monroe, having taken exceptions, referred the matter to the General Grand Chapter at its session, September 16, 1826, when the following was adopted :

 

“Resolved, That the formation of a Grand Chapter for the State of Alabama, in May, 1823,” prior to the expiration of one year from the establishment of the junior chapter in such State, “was prohibited by the 11th section of the 2d Article of the General Grand Constitution, and that therefore this General Grand Chapter cannot ratify or approve of the proceedings of the convention held at Mobile on the third Monday of May, 1823, or recognize the body claiming to be considered the Grand Chapter of Alabama”

 

A recommendation was, however, made to the four chapters to proceed to form a Grand Chapter.

 

On June 2, 1827, the Grand Chapter was reorganized, and met in December following, and annually until 1830, when it ceased to meet.

 

December, 1837, the delegates from the several chapters met and reorganized the Grand Chapter, and it has continued as a constituent of the General Grand Chapter.

 

Arizona.

 

Pursuant to an invitation from Companion Past High-Priest George J.

 

Roskruge of Tucson Chapter, No. 3, a convention of Royal Arch Masons met in the hall of Tucson Lodge, No. 4, F. & A. M., in Tucson, County of Pima, for the purpose of taking steps to organize a Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons for the Territory of Arizona, November 13, 1889.

 

 

 

The convention was called to order by Companion Past High-Priest Martin W. Kales of Arizona Chapter, No. 1. Companion George J.

 

Roskruge of Tucson Chapter 3 was chosen Chairman of the convention and Companion Frank Baxter was elected Secretary.

 

A committee on credentials was appointed and reported the following chapters as being represented, viz.

 

Date of Charter August 24, 1880. Arizona Chapter, No. 1, located at Phoenix, Maricopa County.

 

August 15, 1883. Prescott Chapter, No. 2, located at Prescott, Yarapai County.

 

Tucson Chapter, No. 3, located at Tucson, Pima County.

 

Cochise Chapter, NO. 4, located at Tombstone, Cochise County.

 

Nov. 22, 1889. Flagstaff Chapter, No. 5, located at Flagstaff, Coconino County.

 

A committee was appointed on Constitution and By-Laws, and the convention took a recess; and on resuming labor the committee reported a Constitution and By-Laws, which were adopted.

 

The convention then elected their officers; Martin W. Kales was chosen Grand High-Priest, and Gcorge J. Roskruge Grand Secretary.

 

The convention then adjourned subject to a call from the Grand Secretary.

 

November 12, 1890, the convention met and Companion George J.

 

Roskruge presided.

 

The same chapters, as before, were represented, and there were also present a number of Past High-Priests and Past Grand High-Priests, and Companion Titus of California, all of whom were invited to seats (without votes).

 

The President stated the object of the convention and read his Warrant as Deputy of the General Grand High-Priest of the General Grand Chapter of the United States, dated November 1, 1890.

 

On motion, the constitution, as adopted at the former convention, was amended, to conform to the recommendation of the General Grand High-Priest.

 

The convention then adjourned, that the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Arizona might be opened in ample form.

 

The first annual convocation was then opened (November 12, 1890) at 8 P.M., George J. Roskruge, Grand High-Priest, presiding, and Morris Goldwater, Grand Secretary.

 

The convention then proceeded to elect the Grand Officers, and Martin W. Kales was elected Grand High-Priest, and George James Roskruge was elected Grand Secretary.

 

Companion Roskruge acting as Deputy General Grand High.

 

Priest of the United States constituted the Grand Chapter of Arizona and installed the officers in accordance with the dispensation granted by the General Grand High-Priest, David F. Day.

 

On the following day (November 13, 1890) a convention of Anointed High-Priests was organized and officers were elected.

 

Eight Past High-Priests were anointed.

 

Arkansas.

 

Charters were granted by the General Grand Chapter of the United States to three chapters in Arkansas, the first being under date of September 17, 1841.

 

The Grand Chapter was organized at a convention held April 28, 1851, and Companion Elbert H. English was the first Grand High-Priest.

 

When the General Grand Chapter of the United States held its convocation at Nashville, Tenn., on November 24, 1874, Companion English was elected General Grand High-Priest.

 

His death occurred September 1, 1884.

 

In the years I853 and I854, Companion Albert Pike was the Grand High-Priest.

 

California.

 

The first dispensation to organize a chapter of Royal Arch Masons in California was issued May 9, 1850, to San Francisco Chapter, No.

 

1, and a Charter was granted September 13th.

 

Charters were issued to Sonora, No. 2, and Sacramento, No. 3, September 17, 1853. These three chapters sent delegates to a convention held May 6, 1854, at Sacramento, where measures were taken to organize a Grand Chapter, and after three days’ session adjourned to meet at San Francisco, July 18, 1854, where the organization and constitution were fully completed by the installation of the Grand Officers.

 

Colorado.

 

Central City Chapter, No. 1, in Central City, was the first chapter to which a dispensation, dated March 23, 1863, was issued in Colorado, which was granted by the General Grand King.

 

The Deputy General Grand High-Priest granted a dispensation to Denver Chapter, No. 2, April, 1863.

 

These two chapters had their charters granted at the following session of the General Grand Chapter, September, 1865.

 

A dispensation was issued to organize Pueblo Chapter, No. , at Pueblo, May 24, 1871, and a Charter for the same was issued September 20, 1871.

 

November 25, 1874, charters were issued to Georgetown, No. 4, and Golden, No. 5.

 

A convention was held at Denver City by the authority of Elbert H.

 

English, M.E. General Grand High-Priest, May 11, 1875, and the Grand Chapter of Colorado was regularly constituted.

 

 

 

Connecticut.

 

Six members of Saint John’s Lodge, No. 2, located in the town of Middletown, Conn., having received and been “duly initiated into the most sublime degree of an Excellent, Superexcellent, and Royal Arch Mason in regular constituted Royal Arch Chapters,” and proving each other, they “duly opened and held the first regular Grand Royal Arch Chapter.” (1) They elected their officers. Their first meeting was held September 12, 1783.

 

The “Mother-Chapter,” or Washington Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the City of New York, granted the following charters in Connecticut: Hiram, No. 1, in Newtown, April 29, 1791; Franklin, No. 2, New Haven, May 20, 1795; Franklin, No. 4, Norwich, March 15, 1796, and Solomon, No. 5, Derby, March 15, 1796.

 

Vanden Broeck also No. 5, received its Charter from the Grand Chapter of New York, dated April 6, 1796; it is said, however, that the first record was dated December 24, 1795.

 

 

 

(1) At that day the word “Grand “ was taken from the A. A. A. R., where all the bodies were termed Grand.-EDITOR.

 

 

 

A convention Nyas held by the delegates of these six chapters, in Hartford, May 17, 1798, which organized the Grand Chapter of Connecticut.

 

Half-yearly convocations were held until May, 1819, when the constitution was changed to annual convocations and specials when required.

 

When the convention to form a Grand Chapter met in Hartford, Conn., January 24, A.L. 5798, “ agreeable to the recommendation of a Convention of Committees assembled at Boston, in the State of Massachusetts, in October, 1797,” there were present: from Connecticut, representatives of Solomon Chapter of Derby, instituted 5794; Franklin Chapter, No. 4, Norwich, and Franklin Chapter, No. 5, New Haven. (1) Ephraim Kirby, of Litchfield, was chosen the first General Grand High-Priest.

 

In examining the records of the first chapters prior to the organization of the General Grand Chapter of 1797, we notice the designation of the officers as being somewhat different from the same officers at a more recent date.

 

In Hiram Chapter of Connecticut the officers were “High-Priest, King, Scribe, Zerubbabel a Royal Arch Captain, three Grand Masters, a Treasurer, a Secretary, an Architect, a Clothier, and a Tyler.” It was required that the “High-Priest should preside, direct the business, and occasionally to give a lecture.” Now it is “to read and expound the law.” The Scribe’s duty was to “cause the Secretary to enter, in a fair and regular manner, the proceedings of the chapter,” and “to summons the members for attendance at every regular and special meeting. . . .

 

and also to administer the obligation.” It was the duty of Zerubbabel “to superintend the arrangements of the Chapter”; of the Royal Arch Captain, “to keep watch at the Sanctuary”; of the three Grand Masters, “to watch the Veils”; of the Clothier, “to provide and take care of the Clothing”; of the Architect, “to provide and take care of the furniture.” (2)

 

In the English Royal Arch, Zerubbabel is the first Principal and in the present American Royal Arch, Zerubbabel is the Second Principal, and designated King, which designation, in our judgment, is a misnomer, as he never was a King, but was called “Tirshatha,” which was an office of Governor under the King of Persia, and was, in reality, in the construction of the second Temple, subordinate to the High-Priest, who had entire management of that work.

 

 

 

(1) Compendium, Genl. Gr. Ch., p. 8.

 

(2) Capitular Degrees, “ Hist. Masonry and Con. Orders,” p. 606.

 

 

 

Zerubbabel soon retired and returned to Babylon, and the Temple was finally completed by a High-Priest.

 

Dakota.

 

In 1883 eight chapters had, at different times, been chartered by the General Grand Chapter of the United States, viz. -.

 

Yankton, No. 1, at Yankton; dispensation, April 15, 1876 chartered, August 24, 1880.

 

Sioux Falls, No. 2, at Sioux Falls; chartered, August 27, 1880.

 

Dakota, No. 3, at Deadwood; chartered, August 27, 1880.

 

Siroc, No. 4, at Canton; chartered, August 15, 1883.

 

Pembina, No. 5, at Pembina.

 

Missouri, No. 6, at Bismarck.

 

Casselton, No. 7, at Casselton.

 

Corinthian, No. 8, at Grand Forks.

 

A convention was held at Aberdeen, June 10, 1884, at which the following chapters were represented: Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 of the above list.

 

When it was agreed to petition the General Grand High-Priest to grant a Warrant to organize a Grand Chapter for Dakota, five chapters voted for it and No. 7 against, and finally agreed, as also did Keystone chapter, No. 11, under dispensation.

 

A convention met February 25, 1885, pursuant to a call made January 8, 1885 at Sioux FaHs.

 

Companion William Blatt was chosen Chairman, and the following chapters were reported as being duly represented, viz.: Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 of the above list, and Cheyenne, No. 9, U, D., at Valley City; Huron, No. 10, U.D., at Huron; Keystone, No. 11, U.D., at Fargo; Watertown, No. 12, U.D., at Watertown; Jamestown, No. 13, U.D., at Jamestown, Aberdeen, No.

 

14, U.D., at Aberdeen.

 

The first annual convocation was held June 8, 1885.

 

Charters were granted to Corinthian, No. 8; Huron, No. 10; Watertown, No. 12; Jamestown, No. 13; Aberdeen, No. 14; Millbank, No. 15; and dispensations were litf to Denver, Brookings; Flandreau; Redfield.

 

Chapters which were not represented were: Pembina, No. 5, at Pembina; Missouri, No. 6, at Bismarck, and Millbank, U.D., at Millbank.

 

The Grand Chapter of Dakota continued to prosper until the division of the State, by Act of Congress, February 22, 1889, into North and South Dakota.

 

When, on January 6, 1890, a convention was held in Yankton, S. D., and the representatives of the chapters located in South Dakota held a convention, and by the consent of the Grand Chapter of Dakota they organized the Grand Chapter of South Dakota, January 6, 1890, under the constitution of the General Grand Chapter.

 

Delaware.

 

The early history of the innoduction of Royal Arch Masonry into the State of Delaware is very uncertain.

 

We have no records to refer to.

 

It is said that a Grand Chapter was formed on June 19, 1818.

 

By what authority we can not ascertain; the “compendium” is silent upon Delaware.

 

In the Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter of the Twenty-first Triennial Convocation, held in Baltimore, September 19, 1871, we find the General Grand High-Priest’s reference to the State of Delaware,’ as follows:

 

“Among the first to demand my attention was to examine into the condition of the Grand Chapter of Delaware, and if found to be a legal Grand Chapter, to have the same enrolled under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, as requested by the companions in Delaware.

 

Having been solicited to visit Wilmington, for the purpose of instituting St. John’s Chapter, which had been chartered by this Body at its last convocation (1868), I did so on the 19th of October, 1868, and having instituted said chapter, embraced that opportunity to fully investigate the condition of Royal Arch Masonry in the State, and for that purpose I held interviews with some of the most prominent Royal Arch Masons in the jurisdiction.

 

From those companions, and from the records, I ascertained that there had existed in Delaware no regular Grand Chapter since the year 1856, at which time the original Grand Chapter ceased to meet and elect Grand Officers. I ascertained that there had been a ‘Convocation of Royal Arch Masons’ at Dover in 1859, at which meeting but one chapter, of the three then existing in that State, was legally represented. At that irregular ‘Convocation’ an election was had, Companion GEO. W. CHAYTOR being elected Grand High Priest.

 

“No other convocation of the (so-called) Grand Chapter was held until January, 1868, a period of nine years.

 

During this time, Companion Chaytor claimed to be the Grand High-Priest, but he

 

(3)   Proceedings Genl. Gr. Ch. U.S., 1871, P.10.

 

 

 

refused persistently to assemble the Craft in Grand Convocation.

 

Some three or four years subsequent to the meeting of 1859, a difficulty having aisen between Companion Chaytor and the other members of Washington and Lafayette Chapter, No. 1, of which he was then High-Priest, he, in his capacity of Grand High-Priest, declared the said chapter suspended, thereby placing himself in the anomalous position of a self-suspended Royal Arch Mason; that is, provided he possessed any powers as Grand High-Priest.

 

“At the meeting in January, 1868, there was simply an assemblage of Royal Arch Masons, no one of whom claimed to act in a representative capacity.

 

Companion Chaytor was present, but he refused to open a Grand Chapter, giving as a reason, that his chapter was under a suspension, and therefore there were but two chapters left in the State.

 

Thereupon the assemblage resolved itself into a ‘Royal Arch Convention,’ and proceeded to elect Grand Officers and to adopt a constitution.

 

And this was the body which made application to the last Convocation of the General Grand Chapter, to be recognized as the Grand Chapter of the State of Delaware.

 

“With these facts before me, there was but one conclusion to which I could legitimately arrive.

 

Accordingly, on the 20th of October 1868, I issued an edict, declaring that any legal existence heretofore attaching to a Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State of Delaware had ceased; that said State Grand Chapter no longer existed; and that the several chapters heretofore holding under it had become dormant for non-use and for other reasons.

 

And that, by the fact of the cessation of the Grand Chapter of the State of Delaware, all semblance of lawful governmental authority in that State had ceased, and the territory had become litfore vacant; and therefore the authority of the General Grand Chapter of the United States did, of right, obtain, and was in full force and effect, in said State of Delaware.

 

Thereupon, I did order and direct, that the three Chapters which had formerly held under the Grand Chapter of Delaware, should be received and recognized as lawful Royal Arch Chapters, under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, and with authority to resume and continue work under the warrants then held by them, until the pleasure of the General Grand Chapter was made known, or a State Grand Chapter was formed.

 

“On the 9th day of January, 1869, upon application duly made, and under the power and authority vested in me by the Constitution of the General Grand Chapter, I issued an edict granting permission for the formation of a Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the State of Delaware.”

 

January 20, 1869, the legal representatives of four chapters in Delaware met in convention at Dover and organized a Grand Chapter for the State and adopted their constitution.

 

The General Grand High-Priest, Dr. James M. Austin, was present and installed the Grand Officers; and he officially received and welcomed the said Grand Body into the family of Grand Chapters; and on January 30, 1869, by special edict, he ordered and directed that Grand Chapter to be enrolled under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter of the United States.

 

District of Columbia.

 

The very first intimation we have of the Royal Arch degree in the District of Columbia, we find in the old record-book of the “Excellent, Superexcellent, Royal Arch Encampment,” under the Charter of Federal Lodge, No. 15, F.A.A.M., under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Maryland, which is referred to in Chapter LIL, page 1369.

 

We make the following extracts from that first “Encampment”: “At a meeting of the Royal Arch Encampment, held in the Lodge, No. 15 (Federal Lodge), on Monday, December ‘4th, A. L.

 

5795. Present:

 

Rev. George Ralph, John Bradford, Robert Brown, C. Worthy Stephenson Dennis Dulancy, Thomas Wilson, David Cummings, James Sweeney.

 

Whereas, It appears to be the desire of several Brethren of this Lodge that a Royal Arch Encampment should be established in this city, therefore,

 

“Resolved, That a committee be appointed of the following Brethren, viz.: Brothers Ralph, Wilson, and Dulancy, to procure every necessary apparatus, and to adjust the necessary fees and expenses of admission to this Degree. (1)

 

“Resolved, That the Brethren who wish to join this Encampment be requested to subscribe to a paper instrument, handed to them by

 

(3)   It will be observed that there was but one degree.-EDITOR.

 

 

 

Bro. Sweeney previous to the foregoing Committee proceeding in the calculation in the expenses of our Robes, Veils, (1) Furniture, &c.

 

The Committee to meet on Wednesday evening, at 4 o’clock p.m. and general meeting of the Royal Arch Masons to meet at 6 o’clock previously the same evening.” The meeting then adjourned.

 

December 16, 1795. Present as at last meeting except Bro.

 

Stephenson.

 

The Committee appoiited at the last meeting made their report: which was that twenty-three pounds and one shilling is indispensably necessary to provide the materials to prepare them and to arrange the Lodge room previous to the formation of a Royal Arch Encampment) &c., &c., which was agreed to.

 

At a meeting held June 17, 5797, it was announced by a letter from Comp. Sweeney that a Royal Arch Grand Lodge is about to be formed for the State of Maryland to meet at Baltimore June 24th.

 

A circular letter was received from George L. Gray, No. 5 Market St., Baltimore, giving information of the establishment of a Grand Chapter in the city of Baltimore.

 

This chapter or encampment held its meetings until February, 5799, when it “resolved that the Royal Arch Encampment be broke up!” and a committee was appointed to settle up its affairs and everyone to receive his dividend.

 

To show who were the officers and their titles we give the following list:

 

M.W. James Hoban, High-Pricst.

 

R.W. John Carter, Captain-General.

 

R.W. Robert Brown, 1st Grand Master.

 

R.W. Redmond Purcell, 2d Grand Master.

 

R.W. Peter Lenox, 3d Grand Master.

 

John Hanley, Treasurer.

 

Patrick Hearly, Secretary.

 

John Lenox, Tyler.

 

The second record-book begins as follows

 

At a meeting of the Royal Arch Chapter at their Lodge room on Saturday evening, December 1, 1804, the following Companions present :

 

Phil P. Eckel, High-Priest, p. t. (2) Charles Jones, Captain-General.

 

(1) Robes and Veils are here specified for the first time, we believe.-EDITOR.

 

(2) Philip P. Eckel was a distinguished member of a chapter in Baltimore.-EDITOR.

 

Benj.

 

King, 1st Grand Master.

 

C. M. Laughlan, 2d Grand Master.

 

Bern’d Doland, 3d Grand Master.

 

John Davis, Grand Scribe. (1) Visitors, John Scott, John Carter.

 

The degree of Excellent, Superexcellent, Royal Arch was conferred upon several Brethren, ten dollars being the fee.

 

On Sunday, December 14, 1806, a meeting is recorded, and they adopted the following :

 

“Resolved, That this Chapter concur with the resolution passed by Concordia R. A. Chapter as far as respects a Grand Royal Arch Chapter and that a Committee be appointed to meet in Grand Convention at the City of Washington on the third Wednesday in January next (1807) any Committees which may be appointed for the purpose aforesaid.

 

“February 14, 1807.

 

Ordered that this Chapter be represented at the next Royal Arch Chapter to be held at Baltimore, in the State of Maryland, on the second Thursday of May next, by the Officers fixed on by the Constitution of the Grand Chapter.

 

“Resolved, That that part of the Constitution which states that the High-Priest and King are the proper representatives be altered so as to add, ‘unless ordered by the Chapter.’

 

“Resolved, That the Treasurer do pay into the hands of the Treasurer of the Grand R.A. Chapter $10, for the purpose of obtaining our Warrant (2) and also other Contingent expenses relative thereto.”

 

Februar 7, 18O7, was adopted the following:

 

“Resolved, That in future the following sums shall be paid by Candidates for the following degrees, namely, for Past Master $2, for Mark Master $3, and for the degree of Excellent, Superexcellent, Royal Arch $10.”

 

At this time it was

 

“Resolved, That this Chapter shall hereafter be entitled and known by the name of the Royal Arch Union Chapter.”

 

This record-book terminates August 20, 5808, giving no intimation of any cause whatever why the chapter should not have continued

 

(1) Title of Grand Scribe unknown in the first Encampment.-EDITOR.

 

(2) This seems to indicate that there was no Warrant prior to this date.

 

Its sessions.

 

At the meeting previous to the above date all the officers had been elected and installed.

 

A dispensation had been Isued by the General Grand High-Priest to the several chapters in the District of Columbia to organize a Grand Chapter August 30, 1822, and the report of the committee was adopted recommending the adoption of the resolution above quoted.

 

(1)

 

This Grand Chapter continued in existence from February 10, 1824, to January 8th, 1833, being composed of the following chapters, viz.: Federal Chapter, No. 3; Union Chapter, No. 4; Potomac Chapter, No. 8.

 

 

 

Several conventions were held from time to time, however, between May 11, 1822, and February 10, 1824, at which latter date the delegates of the several chapters of Royal Arch Masons of the District of Columbia met in General Convention and the following chapters were properly represented: Federal Chapter, No. 3; Union Chapter, No. 4; Brooke Chapter, No. 6, of Alexandria, Va., and Potomac Chapter, No. 8, of Georgetown.

 

The convention was duly organized, and the Grand Officers were elected and a constitution which had been regularly formulated and adopted at a former convention was adopted.

 

In the evening of the same day (Tuesday, February 10, 1824) the Grand Royal Arch Chapter for the District of Columbia was opened in ample form, and the convention was accordingly dissolved.

 

The Grand Officers were duly installed by Comp’n John B. Hammett, a Past Grand High-Priest.

 

At a meeting of the Grand Chapter held March 9, 1824, the following communication was received and read and laid on the table:

 

“GEORGETOWN, February 11, 1824, POTOMAC ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER, No. 8.

 

“Resolved Unanimously, That we deem it inexpedient to separate from the Grand Chapter of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia and that we will not avail ourselves of the permission and authority granted by a resolution past said Grand Chapter at their last Communication. (Extracts from the Minute.)

 

EDW. DEEBLE, Scribe.”

 

(3)   Pro. Gen. Gr. Ch., 1826, P. 77.

 

 

 

Previous to the closing of the convention the numbers of the chapters were arranged as follows: Federal, No. 1 ; Union, No. 2; Brooke, No. 3; Potomac, No. 4, and that charters to these should be made accordingly.

 

At the semi-annual meeting we find No. 1 to be designated as Washington Royal Arch Chapter, No. 1.” This change was made by that chapter at a meeting held February 23, 1824.

 

The Grand Chapter continued to exist until its annual communication, held January 8, 1833, which is the last record in the book.

 

Potomac Chapter, No. 4, never united with this Grand Chapter, but held under her old Charter.

 

At the annual meeting of the Grand Chapter, held January 9, 1827, a petition was received from Comp. P. Mauro, on behalf of himself and thirteen other Companions requesting a dispensation or Charter be granted to them for a chapter under the title of Temple Chapter, No. 4, which was unanimously granted.

 

At an adjourned convocation, held March 14, 1827, after installation of the Grand Officers, the officers elect of Temple Chapter, No. 4, were installed by the Grand High-Priest.

 

This Grand Chapter closed its existence after the annual convocation January 8, 1833, as no meeting was recorded in the old book after that date, if any were held at all.

 

We must now refer to the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter and at the eleventh meeting, held September 14, 1841, we find that a resolution was adopted authorizing the Deputy General Grand High-Priest to take the necessary steps to place all chapters of Royal Arch Masons in that part of the District of Columbia, formerly belonging to the State of Maryland, under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of Maryland. (1) At the next meeting, held September 10, 1844, that officer reported that the resolution above referred to had been duly enforced and confirmed by the Grand Chapter of the State of Maryland; and that Grand Chapter has assumed and now holds jurisdiction over that portion of the District of Columbia lying within the limits of the State, that at present Maryland has two chapters at work therein. (2) These two chapters were, Columbia No.

 

15, and Washington No. 16.

 

The chapters in the District of Columbia remained attached to and under the Grand Chapter of Maryland which on September 10,

 

(1) 1841, p. 165.

 

(2) 1844, p. 181.

 

 

 

1844, was changed to Maryland and District of Columbia, until the year 1867, when steps were taken by the four chapters in the District of Columbia to reorganize a Grand Chapter.

 

These were: Columbia, No. 15; Washington, No. 16; Mount Vernon, No. 20; and Potomac, No. 8. After many preliminary conventions, and surmounting technical difficulties and bitter hostilities to their efforts, the General Grand High-Priest, John L. Lewis, gave his consent by telegram first, which was followed by his official letter.

 

Companion Albert G. Mackey, Past General Grand High-Priest, was invited to come from Charleston, S.C., to constitute the Grand Chapter and install the Grand Officers, which ceremonies took place in Washington at the Opera-house, May 23, 18767. The Grand Chapter was successfully launched, but soon encountered quicksand and shoals.

 

The enemies of the Grand Chapter did not hesitate to take the most unmasonic measures to stop the progress of Royal Arch Masonry in the District of Columbia; a self-constituted committee of four visited the General Grand High-Priest at his home in New York and by a tissue of falsehoods and a well-concocted false statement, induced that officer to recall his permission, long after the Grand Chapter had successfully entered upon a very prosperous course.

 

Two constituent chapters had been chartered to take the place of Potomac Chapter, which withdrew from the Grand Chapter and, as in 1824, decided to remain with the Grand Chapter in Maryland.

 

The General Grand High-Priest issued his edict, requiring the chapters in the District of Columbia to disband the new Grand Chapter, and return to their allegiance to the Grand Chapter of Maryland and District of Columbia.

 

This not being complied with, he at once issued another edict, and expelled every Royal Mason belonging to the chapters in the District except those four and the members of Potomac Chapter.

 

Thus matters remained.

 

The Companions in Washington went along about their business of Masonry and a wonderful prosperity followed them.

 

When the General Grand Chapter met in St. Louis in 1868, the Grand Chapter of the District was sustained in her action and admitted to the General Grand Chapter.

 

We have kindly omitted all personalities in this veritable history, because nearly every prominent Companion in this contest has gone to his reward, and we say, as all interested should, Pax Vobiscum.

 

The General Grand Chapter permitted Potomac Chapter, No. 8, to retain her place under the Grand Chapter of Maryland, but decided that the whole territory of the District was in the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia, and she could not receive any petitions for the degrees.

 

This continued for a few months, when Potomac finally asked to be admitted among the faithful, which was readily granted, and since that time there has been no more faithful members of the Grand Chapter than the Companions of Old Potomac, No. 8, and universally esteemed and beloved.

 

The Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia has increased since May 7, 1867, from three chapters with 498 members, to eleven chapters and 2,204 members in 1898.

 

 

 

Florida.

 

 

 

In the “Compendium “ giving the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for the sixth meeting of that body, September 14, 1826, the General Grand High-Priest, DeWitt Clinton, reported that he had granted dispensations for a Mark Lodge in St. Augustine and also one in St. Francisville in Florida. (1)

 

The Grand Chapter of Virginia had chartered two chapters in Florida, viz. : Magnolia, No. 16, at Appalachicola, and Florida, No. 32, at Tallahassee.

 

There was a chapter at St. Augustine chartered by the Grand Chapter of South Carolina.

 

We find in the “Compendium” in the proceedings for the thirteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 14, 1847, the following in the report of the General Grand Secretary: (2)

 

“On the 11th day of January last (1847), three chapters of Royal Arch Masons in the State of Florida, by their delegates, met in Convention and resolved to form a Grand Chapter for that State.

 

They therefore proceeded to frame a Constitution and enact bylaws; and on the 21 st of the same month they elected officers and organized a Grand Chapter; and among their proceedings it will be found that they desire to place their Grand Chapter under your jurisdiction.

 

On receipt of the copy of their Constitution and letter accompanying it, I immediately acknowledged the same, and requested their Grand Secretary to inform me from what Grand

 

(1) “Compendium,” 1826, P. 73.

 

(2) Ibid., 1847, P. 140.

 

 

 

Chapter the several Chapters in the State received their respective charters, and the time when each was issued.

 

To this letter, as yet, I have received no answer.”

 

The next notice of Florida we find in the proceedings of the same meeting, (1) where a committee on General Grand Secretary’s report say :

 

“That it appears from documents referred to your committee, a Convention of delegates from the Royal Arch Chapters in the State of Florida, assembled in Tallahassee, in the month of January, 1847, at which time the following preamble and resolutions were adopted” (which we omit).

 

The committee say:

 

“In the published proceedings of said Grand Chapter we find the adopted Constitution, and the following resolutions :

 

“Resolved, That the Grand Chapter of Florida, duly appreciating the advantages of a Masonic head and paramount authority, are disposed to come under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter of the United States.

 

“Resolved, That the Grand Secretary communicate the same to the General Grand Secretary of the General Grand Chapter.”

 

Among the comments of the committee they say : “It is to be regretted that the Grand Secretary did not furnish that precise information of the origin of the several chapters which composed the convention as would have enabled your committee to report in such a manner as to recommend to this General Grand Chapter the incorporation of that Grand Chapter under your jurisdiction at the present time,” etc.

 

Some objections were also made to several sections of their constitution; they recommended certain resolutions aiming to overcome the objections, and thereby to admit the Grand Chapter to her proper place as a constituent of this General Grand Chapter.

 

The Grand Chapter of Florida did not understand the motive of the action of the General Grand Chapter and did not comply with the request for explanations.

 

At the sixteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter held in 1856 the General Grand High-Priest was authorized to recognize the Grand Chapter of Florida and place it in the same position as the other Grand Chapters, at its request.

 

The war period of 1861 to 1865 prevented the accomplishment

 

(3)   “Compendium,” pp. 158, 159, 161, 171.

 

 

 

Of this arrangement until January 13, 1869, when the Grand Chapter of Florida accepted the invitation by passing the following:

 

“Resolved, That this Grand Chapter accept such invitation in a true Masonic spirit and will hereafter bear allegiance and support to the said General Grand Chapter.”

 

Georgia.

 

The office of the Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter of Georgia can not furnish any information as to when Royal Arch Masonry was introduced into that jurisdiction.

 

The first notice of Georgia in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter is at the third septennial meeting, January 9, 1806, and is a Warrant to Georgia (Chapter at Savannah.

 

At the fourth meeting, beld June 6, 1816 (special), Union Chapter, at Louisville, received a Warrant.

 

At the fifth regular meeting, Augusta Chapter received a Warrant. (1) At the tenth meeting, held September 11, 1838, a dispensation was granted to a chapter at Macon. (2)

 

The next notice of Georgia in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter is at the sixth meeting, in 1826. “That charters have been granted to Mechanic’s Chapter, at Lexington, Georgia, on the 10th June, 1820; to Webb Chapter, at Sparta, Georgia, on 16th November, 1821; by the Deputy General Grand High-Priest, Henry Fowle.” (3) At the same meeting we find the following: “ That Grand Royal Arch Chapters have been legally and constitutionally formed, since the last meeting of this Body, within and for the States of Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Georgia, and Tennessee, with the consent of one of the General Grand Officers

 

At the thirteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 14, 1847, the General Grand Secretary reports as follows : (5)

 

“Within the last few days, however, on examination of the old files of papers, I found a printed paper, to which the name of one of the General Grand Secretaries is affixed, giving a list of the Grand Chapters under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, and therein appears the name of the Grand Chapter of Georgia.

 

“It would seem that this is a good evidence of that Grand

 

(1) “Compendium,” pp. 36, 46, 56.

 

(2) Ibid., pp. 103, 106.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 72.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 76.

 

(5) Ibid., pp. 140, 141.

 

 

 

Chapter having been recognized, and that if so, it should be, in some way, made to appear upon the record.”

 

The report of the committee on the last item as found at the same meeting, was that they did find documentary evidence in the hands of the General Grand Secretary sufficient to prove that the Grand Chapter of Georgia was a constituent of the General Grand Chapter, although said Grand Chapter had not been represented, or made returns to that body since 1822.

 

The above statement of facts is not very flattering to the officers of the General Grand Chapter, whose duty it evidently was to know from the records and registers who were the constituents of that Grand Body.

 

Such remissness and want of knowledge in regard to the very vital affairs show gross neglect of duty and want of care in the management of so important a body of Masons as the General Grand Chapter.

 

Idaho.

 

The Grand Chapter of Oregon granted a Charter to Idaho Chapter, in Idaho City, June 18, 1867, being under the impression that the General Grand Chapter had ceased to exist.

 

This chapter was constituted August 18, 1867.

 

At the twentieth session of the General Grand Chapter, held September 18, 1868, the General Grand Chapter adopted a report, which included “good faith” of the petitioners, healing 61 those who had been exalted in the chapter, and granting a Charter to Idaho Chapter, No. 1, Idaho City, on September 18, 1868. The General Grand Chapter issued warrants to other chapters in Idaho, viz. : February 14, 1870, a dispensation to Cyrus, No. 2, at Silver City, then in Dakota; March 30, 1870, a dispensation to Boise, No. 3, at Boise City; charters were issued to these two September 20, 1871. (1)

 

In the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for August 25, 1880, on petition of Comp. C.P. Coburn and others of Lewiston, Nez Perce County, Idaho, a Charter was granted, August 27, 1880, to Lewiston Chapter, No. 4. (2)

 

At the twenty-sixth triennial, held October 1, 1886, Alturas Chapter, No. 5, at Harley, Dak., was granted a Charter. (1)

 

Pocatello, No. 6, at Pocatello, received a dispensation dated May

 

(1) “Pro. Gen. Gr. Ch. For 1871,” p. 33.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 8t.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 125

 

28, 1889, and a Charter November 22, 1889; Moscow Chapter, at Moscow, received a Charter July 23, 1891; Fayette Chapter.

 

No.

 

8, at Fayette, received a Charter August 24, 1894.

 

Illinois

 

The Deputy General Grand High-Priest, Joseph K. Stapleton, gave a dispensation to Springfield Chapter, in Springfield, July 19, 1841; (1) and at the eleventh triennial meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 14, 1841, a Charter was granted on the 17th. (2)

 

At the twelfth triennial session, September 10, 1844, the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported having issued a dispensation for Lafayette Chapter, in Chicago, dated July 2, 1844. (3)

 

At the thirteenth triennial session, September 14, 1847, he reported having issued litforens to Jacksonville Chapter, No.

 

3, at Jacksonville and Shawneetown Chapter, No. 6, at Shawneetown, since the session of 1844, and a Charter to Lafayette Chapter, in Chicago.

 

The General Grand Scribe Ezra S. Barnum reported having issued dispensations on March 10, 1846, to open Horeb Chapter, No. 4, at Henderson, and April 1, 1846, to open Quincy Chapter, No. 5, at Quincy.

 

At the fourteenth triennial session, September 10, 1850, several of the chapters working under dispensations having applied for charters were refused because they had failed to send up the records of their proceedings, and therefore the committee was unable to say whether their doings had been regular or not.

 

Among these were the chapters Reynolds, Stapleton, Springfield, and Quincy, and recommended that their dispensations be continued in force until next triennial meeting. (5)

 

At the same session (fourteenth) the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported having issued dispensations for the formation of Howard Chapter, on July 28, 1848, and Stapleton Chapter, June 28, 1849.

 

The General Grand King reported that since the last triennial he had granted a dispensation to a chapter to be held in Cambridge in the County of Henry, Ill., to be called Reynolds

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 110 (2) Ibid., p. 111.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 122.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 145.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 201.

 

 

 

Chapter, No.-, (1) dated March 2, 1850.

 

The General Grand Scribe reported that since the last triennial he had granted a dispensation to open a chapter of Royal Arch Masons at Rock Island, Ill., August 1, 1849, (2) to be called Barrett.

 

At the thirteenth triennial meeting the General Grand King reported that he had granted authority to seven chapters in Illinois to organize a Grand Chapter.

 

April 10, 1850, a convention of the representatives of six of these chapters was held, and having the authority of the General Grand King, a Grand Chapter for the State of Illinois was organized.”

 

Indian Territory.

 

A convention of three chartered chapters, Indian, No. 1; Oklahoma, No. 2, and Muskogee, No. 3, was held by their representatives, October 15, 1889; organized and made application to the General Grand High-Priest for authority to constitute a Grand Chapter for Indian Territory, which was refused.

 

Subsequently the succeeding General Grand High-Priest, David F.

 

Day, at the general grand convocation, held at Atlanta, Ga., November 22, 1889, granted their request, and on February 15, 1890, the Grand Chapter was constitutionally instituted.

 

At the second annual convocation, held at Oklahoma, August 20, 1891, seven chapters were represented.

 

Indiana.

 

The first record evidence of the establishment of Royal Arch Masonry in the State of Indiana is found in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter at the sixth meeting, held September 14, 1826, where under the report of a committee on the papers and proceedings of the General Grand Officers they say : “That a Charter had been granted to Vincennes Chapter, at Vincennes, State of Indiana, on 13th May, 1820; to Jennings Mark Lodge, at Vevay, Indiana, on 4th May, 1821, by the General Grand King, John Snow.” (4)

 

September 14, 1838, the committee on the doings of General Grand Officers reported a dispensation having been granted by M.E.

 

Companion Stapleton for a chapter at Richmond, Ind., and recommended a Charter for that chapter (September 14, 1838).

 

This

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 182.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 184.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 183.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 73.

 

 

 

Chapter was named King Solomon.

 

At the eleventh meeting, held September 14, 1841, the Committee on Warrants recommended a Charter to be issued to Logan Chapter, Logansport; the dispensation of this chapter was dated March 12, 1839.

 

At the twelfth meeting, held September 10, 1844, the following statements were made by the General Grand Secretary: (1) “By the records of the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter in 1819, it appears that the Committee to whom was referred the subject matter of dispensations granted by the General Grand Officers during the previous recess had heard that the then late Deputy General Grand High-Priest had granted dispensations for charters at Madison, and at Brookville, in Indiana; but there being no further evidence of their existence before the General Grand Chapter, no ratification of these acts was passed, nor were their charters ordered; although several charters were at that time ordered for other chapters holding dispensations under authority of other General Grand Officers.

 

Consequently, Madison and Brookville Chapters ceased to exist as legally constituted Masonic Bodies at that time.

 

It appears, however, from the herewith accompanying papers, that Madison Chapter continued its labors for many years; and there having been another chapter established at Vincennes, in that State, in 1823, it is said a Grand Chapter was organized with the approbation of M.E. Comp.

 

John Snow, General Grand King. No documentary evidence of that authority, however, or even records of the proceedings of that Grand Chapter are known to exist.

 

Nor does it appear of record that the General Grand Chapter was ever advised of the existence of such an institution.....”

 

On the true position of these things being made known to the Companions at Madison, in the proper spirit of Masonry they immediately suspended all work, closed their chapter, and determined to lay their case before the General Grand Chapter, which was done by their High-Priest, M.E. Joseph G. Norwood, in a very frank, perspicuous, and able manner, presented amongst the documents, accompanied by their dispensation, their return for 1842 to the present time (September 10, 1844), and the payment of such dues as have accrued within that time.

 

No return had been made from 1819 to 1842.

 

Their irregularities were evidently the result of mistakes as to the extent of power given by their dispensation, and

 

(3)   “Compendium,” p. 116.

 

 

 

They asked that their acts may be made lawful by the General Grand Chapter and that all dues up to 1842 be remitted, and asked for a Charter.(1) This was duly granted, September 12, 1844, (2) and all dues remitted up to 1842.

 

The past work was pronounced illegal, and authority was given to heal all who had received degrees in it.

 

At the twelfth meeting above mentioned (1844), the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported having issued a dispensation to Lafayette Chapter, No. 3, at Lafayette, August 17, 1843 ; (3) a Charter was granted to this chapter, September 11, 1844; at this meeting permission was granted by the General Grand Chapter for a convention to assemble, dated November 18, 1845, and the Grand Chapter of Indiana was duly constituted December 25, 1845.

 

Iowa.

 

At the thirteenth ineedng of the General Grand Chapter, held September 14, 1847, the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported that since the triennial session, in 1844, he had litfore the consecration, by proxy, of Iowa Chapter, at Burlington, Ia., and also Iowa City Chapter, at Iowa City.

 

He had also issued a dispensation to form Dubuque Chapter, No. 3, at Dubuque, Ia.(4) Charter to the same was dated September 17, 1847.

 

Dispensation to Iowa Chapter, No. 1, was dated August 24, 1843.

 

(5)

 

Charter to the same was dated September 11, 1844.

 

Dispensation to Iowa City Chapter, No. 2, was dated March 19, 1844. (6) Charter to the same was dated September 17, 1847.

 

At the fifteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 17, 1853, Washington Chapter, No. 4, at Muscatine, Ia., was chartered, dated September 17, 1853. (7)

 

A dispensation had been issued to McCord Chapter, No. 5, at Fairfield, probably in March, 1853.

 

The Deputy General Grand High-Priest, Joseph K. Stapleton, having died very soon thereafter, no report was made. (8) That chapter received a Charter from the Grand Chapter of Iowa after it was constituted, dated June 14, 1854.

 

A convention of the above-narmed chapters, by their delegates,

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 117.

 

(2) Ibid., (3) Ibid., p. 121.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 145.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 121 (6) Ibid., p. 122.

 

(7) Ibid., p. 259.

 

(8) Proceedings, 1856, p. 361.

 

 

 

Was held at Mount Pleasant, June 8, 1854, by the authority of the General Grand Scribe, A.V. Rowe. (1)

 

The history of Capitular Masonry in Iowa would not be completed were we to omit one of those peculiar episodes which, with cyclonic force, carries away before it all the valuable works of the good and great Masonic Architects, who have labored so hard, and industriously, in the erection of Masonic temples, and which we quote from Companion A.F. Chapman’s history of Capitular Masonry in the History of Masonry and Concordant Orders:

 

“Within about two years after being organized, the usefulness of the General Grand Chapter came under discussion.

 

The Grand High Priests early gave emphasis to this negative feeling.

 

In 1857 the delegates to the next session of the General Grand Chapter were instructed to vote for its dissolution.

 

This was re-enforced in 1858.

 

The Grand Chapter asserted its sovereignty and independent right to organize chapters in Nebraska or elsewhere, where no Grand Chapter existed, and finally, on August 16, 1860, the resolution declaring the

 

“’Grand Chapter sovereign and independent, and in no manner whatever subject to the General Grand Chapter of the United States, and this Grand Chapter is forever absolved from all connection therewith,’

 

was passed by a vote of twenty-eight ayes to fifteen nays.

 

“This condition continued for nine years, when, at the triennial convocation, September, 1871, the General Grand High Priest reported that, under date of October 26, 1869, he had ‘received official notice that the Grand Chapter of Iowa had rescinded the act of secession passed in 1860, and had directed that the O.’.B.’. of allegiance should be administered to all the members of chapters in that jurisdiction, and that hereafter it would be administered to candidates receiving the Royal Arch degree.’ (2)

 

“This Grand Chapter has been represented in the General Grand Chapter since 1871.

 

“Robert Farmer Bower of Iowa Grand Chapter was chosen General Grand High Priest in 1880, and died before his term was out.”

 

(1) Proceedings, 1856, p. 376.

 

(2) “History of Masonry,” p. 613.

 

 

 

Kansas.

 

The first dispensation was issued to Leavenworth Chapter, No. 1, at Leavenworth, January 24, 1857; to Washington Chapter, at Atchison, May 18, 1859. These two dispensations were reported by the General Grand High-Priest at the seventeenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September, 1859, and at this meeting a Charter was granted to Washington Chapter, No. 2, September 14, 1859.

 

In the proceedings of the special convocation of the General Grand Chapter called by Comp. Albert G. Mackey, General Grand High-Priest, which assembled in Columbus, O., September 7, 1865, Washington Chapter, No. 1, of Kansas is reported present by Jacob Saqui, H.P. (1) At the triennial communication held next day, September 8th, at the same place, the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported that he had renewed the dispensation of Leavenworth Chapter in May, 1863. (2) On September 8, 1865, a Charter was granted, (3) and also a Charter was granted to Fort Scott Chapter, the General Grand Secretary having reported that a dispensation had been issued to the chapter. (4)

 

By permission of the Deputy General Grand High-Priest a convention of the delegates of the several chapters was held January, 1866, and on February 23, 1866, a Grand Royal Arch Chapter was duly organized and constituted.

 

Kentucky.

 

In the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter at the fifth regular meeting, September 9, 1819, the proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky were presented and read, and a resolution was passed, viz. : “Whereas, It has been communicated to the General Grand Chapter that several Warrants of Constitution were granted since the last communication authorizing the opening and holding of Royal Arch Chapters in Lexington, Frankfort, and Shelbyville, in the State of Kentucky, by our late Most Excellent Companion, Thomas Smith Webb, and that said Chapters having been constitutionally in operation for the space of more than one year, did form themselves into a Grand Chapter for said State

 

(1) Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter, 1862-65, p. 7 (2) Ibid., p. 23.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 31.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 27.

 

 

 

Under the jurisdiction of this body, and have been regularly organized as such, by M.E. Companions De Witt Clinton, General Grand High Priest, and Thomas Smith Webb, late Deputy General Grand High Priest.

 

“Resolved, Therefore, that this General Grand Chapter approves and recognizes the formation of said Grand Chapter for said State of Kentucky.”(1)

 

The dispensations for the above-mentioned three chapters had been issued by Companion Thomas Smith Webb, Deputy General Grand High-Priest, October 16, 1816.

 

In the proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky will be found the correspondence in reference to the formation and constituting of the Grand Chapter, and also the recognition by the Deputy General Grand High-Priest, dated December 12, 1817, at Worthington, O., and by DeWitt Clinton, M. Ex. General Grand High-Priest, December 30, 1817.

 

At the annual convocation of the Grand Chapter, held in Lexington, September 5, 1825, the Grand Chapter adopted certain resolutions, to petition the General Grand Chapter, and to address letters to the other Grand Chapters on the propriety of dissolving the General Grand Chapter. (2) The memorial was issued, and it is found in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for the sixth meeting, September 4, A.L. 5826. (3) This memorial was referred to an appropriate committee, which reported, giving a statement as to how the several Grand Chapters had acted upon the question showing, that “as a majority of the Grand Chapters of the Several States dissented from the resolution of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky, it is not expedient for the General Grand Chapter to take any further measures on the subject.” This was after some consideration referred to a committee of the whole.

 

That committee after having deliberately considered and discussed the report, it was agreed to report the same without amendment to the General Grand Chapter, which body decided by a vote of yeas 47, noes 2, to agree to the report of the committee. (4)

 

Very properly, the Grand Chapter of Kentucky appeared to be contented with this decision.

 

The report of the General Grand Secretary at the triennial session,

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 52.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 62.

 

(3) Ibid., pp. 52-69.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 71.

 

Proceedings, 1874, p. 17.

 

 

 

September, 1859, shows that the Grand Chapter of Kentucky had adopted resolutions of withdrawal from the General Grand Body.

 

At the twenty-second triennial convocation, held November 24, 1871 the General Grand High-Priest, in his address, stated “That the Grand Chapter of Kentucky has rescinded her resolutions of withdrawal and has renewed her allegiance.

 

Her representatives are here with us,” etc.

 

She has remained in true allegiance ever since.

 

Louisiana.

 

The first reference we find in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter to Royal Arch Masonry in Louisiana, is at the twelfth meeting, held September 10, 1844, wherein is a report on the appeal of C.D. Lehman, of New Orleans, from a judgment of the so-called Grand Chapter of Louisiana.

 

Difficulties had occurred between the officers and members of Holland chapter, No. 9, in New Orleans.

 

From the documents presented the committee learned “that a Grand Chapter of Louisiana was organized in 1813, by the ‘Royal Lodges’ Concordia and Perseverance, and such Officers and Members of the Grand Lodge of the State as were Royal Arch Masons.” Note, these lodges were originally organized in the Island of San Domingo, under charters from the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, with powers to confer all the degrees from Entered Apprentice to Royal Arch inclusive.

 

When the revolution occurred in San Domingo, many of the members of these lodges made their escape and stopped for a while in Cuba, but finally settled in New Orleans, and having retained their charters, resumed labor in that city. (1)

 

The Grand Chapter formed in the manner above stated was attached to, and made dependent on, the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, and the M.W. Grand Master of that body was ex officio and by “inherent right” Grand High-Priest of the new Grand Chapter.

 

The question as to the legality of these proceedings had been foreclosed in 1829, by the admission of a representative from the Grand Chapter of Louisiana, in the person of Companion McConnell, on whose return to New Orleans the Grand High-Priest, Companion John Holland, convened the officers and members of the

 

(3)   Reprint of Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter from 1798 to 1856, p. 194.

 

 

 

Grand Chapter, who, by an official act, in regular assembly, enrolled themselves under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, in the manner prescribed by the 13th Section of the 4th Article of the General Grand Constitution; of which act it notified all the subordinate chapters under its jurisdiction, and directed similar action on their part, and enjoined a strict observance of the provisions of the General Constitution.

 

From 1829 tO 1831 the Grand Chapter of Louisiana conducted all of her proceedings in good faith and true allegiance to the General Grand Chapter.

 

From 1831 to April, 1839, there was no meeting.

 

The subordinate chapters had ceased to exist, except Holland, No.

 

9, which kept up its work until the revocation of its Charter in 1841. In that year, the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, by direction of the Grand Master, issued notices to certain Royal Arch Masons in New Orleans, to assemble and elect Grand Officers, with the intention of a reorganization of the State Grand Chapter.

 

This meeting did not occur; but another was soon thereafter called, and the High-Priest and three other officers of Holland Chapter were notified.

 

The usual Grand Officers were elected at this meeting, and the so-styled Grand Chapter of Louisiana was organized.

 

From the testimony submitted to the committee, it appeared that the High-Priest of Holland Chapter, Compn. Henry, was not present at this election; nor could the committee ascertain that there was any Companion present who was entitled to vote in an election of Grand Officers.

 

Shortly after this, Compn. Henry was officially notified by the Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter of Louisiana of the organization of the Grand Chapter, and requiring of Holland Chapter her dues and returns from 1832 to 1838 inclusive.

 

Holland Chapter protested against this demand and asked for evidence of the legality of the organization of the Grand Body, which was refused, and Holland Chapter declined to recognize its authority.

 

The body, assuming to be the Grand Chapter, proceeded to revoke the Charter, and to expel the High-Priest and Secretary of Holland Chapter.

 

The Secretary, Compn. C.D. Lehman, made his appeal to the General Grand Chapter.

 

On July 24, 1843, he served the reputed Grand Chapter with a notice of his intention, and it was shown when this notice was served, the Grand High-Priest of the Grand Chapter, in his place, and in open chapter declared “that he did not acknowledge any other body, and was independent of the General Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the United States.”

 

From the above statement it would appear that the Grand Royal Arch Chapter, organized in 1813, voluntarily surrendered its independent jurisdiction and enrolled itself under the General Grand Chapter, which body continued until 1831, and having ceased her operations by not meeting and electing officers, as required by the General Grand Constitution, it ceased to exist.

 

All the existing subordinate chapters came immediately under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, which alone had legal authority over the jurisdiction thus vacated, as by Article 2, Section 2, of the General Grand Constitution.

 

The deceased Grand Chapter could only be revived by Article 2, Section 9.

 

The committee recommended and which was unanimously adopted: That Holland Chapter, No. 9, be directed to resume its labors under the direction of its former officers and members, with power to fill existing vacancies, and that it be required to make its annual returns, and settle its dues with the General Grand Secretary. (1)

 

In the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for 1847 we find in a report on Holland Chapter, No. 9, “that the Charter of said Chapter has been either lost or stolen; and that the dispensation under which it has been working for the past year expires by the terms of its own limitation with the present session of this General Grand Chapter.

 

They therefore respectfully recommend that the General Grand Secretary be authorized to execute a new Charter, to take the place of that which has been lost, etc., which was accepted.” (2)

 

The General Grand Chapter at this session “Resolved, That there is not at this time any constitutional and legally authorized Grand Royal Arch Chapter in the State of Louisiana.

 

“Resolved, That the Association holding its meetings in the City of New Orleans, and assuming to exercise the functions and authority of a Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons is an irregular and unauthorized Masonic body; and it is hereby disowned and repudiated as spurious, clandestine, and illegal.”

 

Masonic intercourse, public and private, was interdicted, and

 

(1) Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter from 1798 to 1856, pp. 193-195.

 

(2) Ibid., pp. 218, 219.

 

 

 

Due notice of these resolutions was to be forwarded to the acting Secretary of said body by the General Grand Secretary. (1)

 

The Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported at this session, September 14, 1847, that since the session of 1844 he had issued dispensations to the following bodies in Louisiana: New Era, No.

 

2; Red River, No. 3; East Feliciana, (2) No. 4. No dates given.

 

He had also issued a dispensation to Holland Chapter, No. 1, at New Orleans, to continue work until the present session, (3) April 7, 1845, and a new Charter recommended, which was done as above stated.

 

When the Charter to East Feliciana, No. 4, was granted, by request of the chapter the name and place were changed to Clinton, to be located at Clinton.

 

At the same time charters were granted to New Era, No. 2, at New Orleans; Red River, No. 3, at Shreveport; viz. : September 15, 1847.

 

At the fourteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, September 10, 1850, a committee reported that “ on the personal knowledge of one of their own members who represents that State (Louisiana) in this Body, that those difficulties are now adjusted, and that the different Grand Bodies of that State, in all degrees of Masonry, are now united as one in that harmony without which our Order can not exist.” (5)

 

At this session (1850) the General Grand King reported “that he had litfore Holland Chapter, No 1; New Era Chapter, No. 2; Red River Chapter, No. 3, and Clinton Chapter, No. 4, in the State of Louisiana, to organize and establish a Grand Chapter for that State; which they did in the City of New Orleans, on 1st day of May, 1848.” (6)

 

Maine

 

As the territory, occupied by Maine was a part of Massachusetts until it was made a State in 1820, the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts granted a Warrant of Constitution to organize a chapter in Portland, Me., February 13, 1805.

 

The same Grand Chapter issued dispensations, December 17, 1819, to Montgomery, at Bath, and to New Jerusalem, at Wiscasset; on December 29, 1819, to Jerusalem Chapter, in Hollowell.

 

Henry Fowle, Deputy Grand High-Priest, constituted these three chapters, respectively, July 18,

 

(1) Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter from 1798 to 1856, p. 128 (2) Ibid., p. 209.

 

(3) Ibid., 209.

 

(4) Ibid., 225 (5) Ibid., p. 248.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 253.

 

 

 

19, and 21, 1820, which was reported by him to James Prescott, Grand High-Priest.

 

These three chapters, with Mt. Vernon Chapter, of Portland, met in convention in Portland, 1820, and adopted the constitution of the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts provisionally, and the Grand Chapter Officers were chosen and organized and constituted the Grand Chapter of Maine. (1)

 

The first reference to Royal Masonry in Maine by the General Grand Chapter is found in the proceedings for the triennial meeting, September 15, 1826, (2) when the committee reported the legal constitution of the Grand Chapter, and by resolution adopted, that Grand Chapter was recognized and received under the authority and sanction of the General Grand Chapter.

 

This Grand Chapter had the honor of having two of her Members selected as General Grand Officers in the General Grand Chapter of the United States, viz. : Robert P. Dunlap, General Grand High-Priest for three terms, in 1847, 1850, and 1853; and Josiah H. Drummond, General Grand High-Priest in 1871.

 

Maryland.

 

A circular letter from Concordia Chapter in Baltimore was issued to all the chapters in Baltimore and the “Encampment of Excellent, Superexcellent, Royal Arch” (In the District of Columbia), inviting them to send representatives to a convention to be held in the city of Washington, January 21, 1807, to take into consideration the propriety of forming a Grand Chapter for the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia.

 

Those chapters in Baltimore which met in this convention were Washington, Concordia, and St. John’s.

 

We find from Compn. Edward T. Schultz’s History of Capitular Masonry in Maryland that “Undoubtedly [Washington Chapter] was the Royal Arch Chapter of Jerusalem, instituted in 1787 by virtue of the dispensation or warrant of Lodge No. 7, Royal Arch Chapter of Jerusalem, at Chestertown, and was attached to Lodge No. 15, now Washington Lodge, No. 3.” This chapter finally was merged with Concordia in 1822.

 

(1) “History of Masonry and Concordant Orders,” p. 616.

 

(2) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1826, p. 82.

 

 

 

Companion Schultz informs us: (1) “It is probable that Royal Arch Chapters were attached to most of the active Lodges in the State.

 

Hiram Lodge, No. 27, at Port Tobacco, as we have seen, resolved to open a ‘Royal Arch Chapter.’ There is evidence to show that more than one dispensation was granted in the year 1797.

 

Brother David Kerr was at the time Grand Master, and by virtue of the power and control of the Royal Arch Degree, believed to be inherent in Grand Masters, issued his dispensations for the formation of these several Chapters which then, in connection with the Chapter attached to Washington Lodge, formed, June 24, 1897, the first Independent Grand Chapter in the United States.

 

The Grand Chapter claimed to have been organized in 1796 in Pennsylvania, was an appendage to the Grand Lodge of that State, and did not become independent until the year 1824.”

 

In the above statement of Companion Schultz we heartily concur.

 

The Grand Chapter of 1797 in Maryland became dormant in 1803, and was revived in 1807, according to documents shown in Companion Schultz’s history. (2)

 

A Grand Royal Arch Convention was held by the H. Royal Arch Chapters in the State of Maryland and District of Columbia in the city of Washington on January 21, 1807. Washington, Concordia, and St John’s chapters of Baltimore, Federal and Washington Naval of Washington City and Potomac Chapter of Georgetown of the District of Columbia were present by their representatives.

 

This Convention resolved unanimously to organize a Grand Chapter for the State of Maryland and the District of Columbia.

 

They elected the Grand Officers, and opened the Grand Chapter in ample form. A committee was appointed to frame a constitution, which reported, and their report was unanimously adopted.

 

The degrees recognized by this Grand Chapter were Mark Master, Past Master, Most Excellent Master, and Royal Arch.

 

We make the following extract from Companion Schultz’s Freemasonry in Maryland: (3)

 

“Since the finding of these books (old Records), documents have been brought to light, which in connection with them throw much light upon the early history of the Grand R.A. Chapter of Maryland, and the District of Columbia, which as it will be seen

 

(1) History of Capitular Masonry in Maryland,” pp. 321, 322, 323.

 

(2) Ibid.

 

(3) Vol. i., pp. 317, 318.

 

 

 

Was the title of the body subsequently formed by the representatives of the chapters in Baltimore and Washington.”

 

The great care, diligence, and indefatigable zeal of Companion Schultz manifested in his history, deserve especial mention by all succeeding historians of Masonry, for his valuable additions to the ancient history of Masonry in Maryland in all the branches – and we continue our extracts:

 

“Some months since we learned that the Masonic papers of Philip P. Eckel, which were supposed to have been lost or entirely destroyed, were in the possession of his granddaughter, Mrs.

 

David J. Bishop, living in this city (Baltimore), and who has since most kindly placed them at our disposal. These papers were found to be of great interest as they disclosed the existence of Masonic bodies held in Baltimore prior to the year 1800, that were not previously known or mentioned by any Masonic writer.”

 

Brother Eckel was perhaps the most active and zealous Mason that ever lived in this jurisdiction; there is scarcely a record or document existing in this State, from about 1792 to 1828, that does not mention his name in some capacity.

 

Mackey says: “He was one of the most distinguished and enlightened Masons of his day;” and we add to this that he was evidently an “Inspector General” of the A.’. A.’. S.’. Rite.

 

Companion Schultz furnishes facsimile copies of several of the documents referred to, and to prove that a Grand Chapter existed in Baltimore is such a copy of a “dispensation” from David Kerr, Grand High-Priest, to Philip P.

 

Eckel as High-Priest, to assemble a sufficient number of Companions to open and hold a chapter of Royal Arch Masons, etc., in Baltimore, which was to continue in force until June 20, 1797.

 

This dispensation is dated May 8, 1797.

 

No further records or documents of any description have been discovered in reference to the Grand Chapter organized in 1807, and the reorganization which occurred in the year 1814.

 

On May 9th of that year delegates from Chapters Nos. 1, 2, and 3 met in the city of Baltimore, when a constitution for the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia was adopted and Grand Officers elected. (1)

 

This Grand Chapter continued with above title until the withdrawal of the chapters located in the District of Columbia, except

 

(3)   Schultz’s “History of Maryland,” vol. i., p. 325.


 

 

FIRST VIEW OF JERUSALEM BY THE CRUSADERS
 

 

 

 

 

Potomac, No. 8, at Georgetown, which elected to remain under the jurisdiction of Maryland.

 

This severance was done by the authority of the General Grand Chapter, August 30, 1822. (1)

 

After this the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia ceased to exist, the chapters in Washington City and Alexandria had no Grand Head until 1841, when steps were taken to place the chapters in the District of Columbia under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of Maryland. (2) This condition continued until May 7, 1867, when the three chapters in the District of Columbia which were under the jurisdiction of Maryland and District of Columbia, viz. : Columbia, Washington, and Mount Vernon, were duly organized, and constituted the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia.

 

That this was regularly and lawfully accomplished, we refer to the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for 1865.

 

The following was referred to a committee:

 

“Resolved, That the Royal Arch Chapters in the District of Columbia or any three of them, are hereby authorized to establish a Grand Chapter for the District of Columbia; and whenever such Grand Chapter shall be organized, the jurisdiction now exercised over the chapters taking part in the same, by the Grand Chapter of Maryland, shall cease.” (3) That committee reported in 1868, and the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia was sustained.

 

Massachusetts.

 

The Royal Arch Chapter of St. Andrew’s was one of the three original chapters which met in convention in Boston, October 24, 1797, and issued the “Circular,” which invited the assembling of a convention in Hartford, Ct., January 24, 1798, “to form and open a Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, and to establish a Constitution for the government and regulation of all the chapters that now are or may be hereafter erected within the said States.” (4)

 

The first notice of conferring the Royal Arch degree which we find was August 28, 1769, in St Andrew’s Chapter, called “Royal Arch Lodge,” under the sanction of St. Andrew’s Lodge Charter, No. 82, under the Registry of Scotland.

 

From August 12, 1769, until 1788, the title “Royal Arch Master” was employed.

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1826, P. 77.

 

(2) Ibid., 1841, p. 161; 1842, p. 181.

 

(3) Ibid., i865, P. 31.

 

(4) “Compendium,” p. 7.

 

Michigan

 

At the fifth regular meeting, of the General Grand Chapter, held September 9, 1819, the committee reported that the General Grand High-Priest had granted a dispensation to Monroe Chapter, No. 1, at Detroit, December 3, 1818. (1)

 

At the twelfth meeting of the General Grand Chapter a dispensation was reported as having been granted, by the Dep.

 

General Grand High-Priest, May 16, 1844, to St Joseph’s Valley Chapter, No. 2, at Niles. (2) Also the same officer reported, at the thirteenth meeting, held September 14, 1847, that a dispensation had been granted (without date) to Jackson Chapter, No. 3, in Jackson. (3)

 

A Charter was granted to Monroe Chapter, No. 1, September 11, 1819; (4) and at the litfo of September 14, 1847, a Charter was granted to St. Joseph’s Valley, No. 2; (5) and September 16, 1847, to Jackson Chapter, No. 3, (6) by vote of the General Grand Chapter.

 

The General Grand Scribe, in January, 1848, (7) authorized the chapters in Michigan to meet and organize a Grand Chapter for the State.

 

Minnesota.

 

The first notice of Royal Arch Masonry, in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter, we find at the fifteenth meeting, held September 17, 1853, when the committee reported that “a number of companions at St. Paul, Minn., have petitioned the General Grand King for a dispensation,” and recommended a dispensation to be issued by the present Deputy General Grand High-Priest. (8)

 

At the triennial session, September 11, 1856, a Charter was granted. (9) Dispensations were issued by the General Grand High- Priest to the following chapters: Vermillion, No. 2, in Hastings, June 20, 1857; St. Anthony Falls, No. 3, in St. Anthony, January 5, 1858.

 

On September 14, 1859, charters were granted to these.

 

A convention was held, by authority of Compn. Albert G. Mackey, General Grand High-Priest, dated December 1, 1859, in St. Paul, December 17, 1859, a constitution was adopted and the Grand Chapter of Minesota was regularly organized.

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 60.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 182.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 209.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 60.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 209.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 225.

 

(7) Ibid., p. 254.

 

(8) Proceedings, 1853, p. 320.

 

(90 Ibid., 1856, p. 373.

 

 

 

Mississipi

 

At the sixth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 14, 1826, the General Grand High-Priest reported having issued a dispensation to a chapter at Port Gibson, Miss.

 

On the 15th at the same meeting, a Charter was granted. (1)

 

September 14, 1841, it was reported that a dispensation was issued to Vicksburg Chapter, June 17, 1840; and a Charter was granted September 17, 1841.

 

At the twelfth session, September 10, 1844, (2) the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported having issued dispensations to chapters in Mississippi as follows, viz. : to Columbus Chapter, February 7, 1842; and to Jackson, August 28, 1843.

 

The General Grand High-Priest reported having issued a dispensation to a chapter at Holly Springs, October 30, 1841. (3) At the thirteenth session, September 14, 1847, the General Deputy Grand High-Priest reported that he had authorized the consecration of three chapters in Mississippi since the session of 1844, for which charters had been ordered at that time, viz. : Columbus Chapter, at Columbus; Jackson Chapter, at Jackson; and Wilson Chapter, at Holly Springs. (4) He also reported having issued two dispensations to organize chapters: Carrollton Chapter, No. 7, at Carrollton; and Yazoo Chapter, No.

 

8, in Yazoo County. (5)

 

In compliance with a petition from the chapters in Mississippi, the General Deputy Grand High-Priest reported that, March 12, 1846, he had granted permission for those chapters to form a Grand Chapter for that State; and he had been officially notified that the Grand Chapter had been duly organized, May 18, 1846. (6)

 

Missouri

 

At the regular meeting of the General Grand Chapter (September 11, 1819) it was reported that the Grand High-Priest had granted a dispensation to form a chapter in Missouri Territory, at St.

 

Louis, on April 3, 1819, (7) and a Warrant was granted, September 16, 1826, (8) at the sixth meeting.

 

 

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1798-1856, p. 89.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 163.

 

(3) Ibid., P. 78.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 209.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 209.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 210.

 

(7) Ibid., p. 56.

 

(8) Ibid., p. 83

 

At the tenth meeting, September 14, 1838, the General Grand Scribe reported that a dispensation had been issued for a Charter to Palmyra Chapter, No. 2 (1) (no date given).

 

The committee recommended a Charter to be issued whenever the provisions of the constitution should have been complied with.

 

A Charter, however, was not given by the General Grand Chapter, but after the formation of the Grand Chapter of Missouri, it was given October 16, 1847.

 

At the twelfth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 10, 1844, (2) the Deputy General Grand High-Priest reported having issued dispensations to Liberty Chapter, No. 3, at Liberty, February 7, 1842; one to Weston Chapter, No. 4, at Weston, January 17, 1843; and one to Booneville Chapter, No. 6, at Booneville, March 3, 1843; one to La Fayette Chapter, No. 5, September 11, 1844. Charters were ordered to all chapters reported by the committee, viz.: Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 6. (3)

 

At the thirteenth meeting, held September 14, 1847, it was reported by the Deputy General Grand High-Priest that since the session of 1844 he had issued a dispensation to consecrate Booneville Chapter, No. 6, and he had issued dispensations to organize St. Louis Chapter, No. 8, at St. Louis, and Hannibal Chapter, No. 7, at Hannibal, No. On September 17, 1847, charters were ordered to be issued to Hannibal, No. 7, and St. Louis, No.

 

8. (4)

 

The convention to organize a Grand Chapter for the State of Missouri met in St. Louis, October 16, 1846, and the delegates of Chapters Nos. 1. 2, 5, and 6 were present, and did organize the Grand Chapter.

 

In the report of the General Grand Secretary of the General Grand Chapter, at the thirteenth meeting, held September 14, 1847, he states :

 

“In the month of November, 1846, I received notice of the formation of a Grand Chapter for the State of Missouri, purporting to be by authority from the General Grand Officers.

 

This, however, was an error; and on being informed by me that there had been no such authority given, it is believed no further proceedings have been had in the matter.” (5)

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1798-1856, p. 153.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 181.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 185.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 232.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 206.

 

We find the following minute in the proceedings of that day “To the General Grand Chapter:

 

“The Committee to whom was referred the action of the Grand Chapter of Missouri, have had the same under consideration, and respectfully report

 

“That the Grand Chapter of Missouri was formed, as we think, by the Chapters thereof in good faith, believing that they were fully authorized to do so, from conversations and correspondence with the Comp. General Grand Secretary.

 

Your Committee, however, believe that this organization was not strictly in conformity with the Constitution of this General Grand Chapter; therefore,

 

“Resolved, That all irregularities be removed, and that said Grand Chapter of Missouri be fully recognized, and that its representatives be invited to seats in this General Grand Chapter.” (1)

 

Compn. J.W.S. Mitchell, of the Grand Chapter of Missouri, offered the following:

 

“Resolved, That the Chapters working by dispensation under this jurisdiction in Missouri be, and they are, required to pay dues to this General Grand Chapter up to the period when a Grand Chapter was organized in the said State of Missouri, viz. : October, 1846,” (2) which was adopted.

 

Montana.

 

The organization of the Grand Chapter of Montana, at Helena, June 25, 1891, was consummated in accordance with a call of the chapters and a Warrant which had been issued by the General Grand High-Priest, Companion David F. Day.

 

The chapters constituting the Grand Chapter were:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation

 

Charter Virginia City, No. 1, at Virginia City,

 

July 14, 1866 December 18, 1868 Helena, No. 2, at Helena,

 

 

 

 

 

December, 1867 December 18, 1868 Deer Lodge, No. 3, at Butte City,

 

 

 

October 10, 1874 November 25, 1874 Valley, No. 4, at Deer City,

 

 

 

 

 

July 22, 1880

 

August 27, 1880 Yellow Stone, No. 5, at Miles City,

 

January 2, 1886

 

October 1, 1886 Billings, No. 6, at Billings,

 

 

 

May 6, 1886

 

 

 

October 1, 1886 Livingston, No. 7, at Livingston,

 

 

 

July 15, 1886

 

October 1, 1886 Dillon, No. 8, at Dillon,

 

 

 

 

 

January 15, 1887 November 22, 1889 Great Falls, No. 9, at Great Falls,

 

March 13, 1889 November 22, 1889

 

(3)   Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1798 – 1856, p. 219 (2) Ibid., p. 231

 

Nebraska.

 

At the triennial communication of the General Grand Chapter, held September 8, 1865, the General Grand King reported:

 

“On the 21st day of November, 1859, I granted to sundry Companions at the City of Omaha, in Nebraska Territory, a dispensation to form and open a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons at that place, to be called Omaha Chapter, No. 1.” He also reported having issued a dispensation, January 25, 1860, to Keystone Chapter, No. 2, at Nebraska City.

 

Also that on July 13, 1864, a dispensation had been granted to Nebraska Chapter, No. 3, at Plattsmouth. (1) On the same day (September 8, 1865) charters were granted to all three of the above chapters. (2)

 

By permission of the Deputy General Grand High-Priest a convention was held, March 19, 1867, and the Grand Chapter of Nebraska was regularly organized.

 

Nevada.

 

At the triennial of the General Grand Chapter, held September 8, 1865, the General Grand High-Priest reported having issued a dispensation, in May, 1863, to “Lewis Chapter,” at Carson City, Nevada, which name was a compliment to himself (3) (John L.

 

Lewis).

 

This chapter received the Charter, dated September 8, 1865. (4) A dispensation was issued to Virginia Chapter, at Virginia City. (5) From the report, in the proceedings, it is very uncertain when the dispensation was issued.

 

The Charter was ordered September 18, 1868.

 

A dispensation was granted to Austin Chapter, at Austin, October, 1866, and a Charter, September 18, 1868.

 

A dispensation was issued to White Pine Chapter, at Hamilton, January 10, 1871; and a Charter, September 20, 1871.

 

(6)

 

A convenion of these four chapters was held by authority of the General Grand High-Priest, November 18, 1873.

 

From the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for November 21, 1874, we see in the report of the General Grand Secretary that a dispensation had been issued to St. John’s Chapter, at Eureka, April 26, 1873; and also to Keystone Chapter, at Pioche,

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1865, P. 25.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 31.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 23.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 31.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 23.

 

(6) Ibid., 1871, p. 33.

 

 

 

June 12, 1873. (1) The General Grand Secretary says: “The Chapters organized U.’. D.’.in Nevada, made returns and paid dues to date of the organization of the Grand Chapter of Nevada, of which they became components, in accordance with a custom hitherto approved by the General Grand Chapter.” (2)

 

New Hampshire.

 

In the session of the General Grand Chapter of the United States, held June 6, 1816, we find that the General Grand King reported that he had granted warrants or charters for St. Andrew’s Chapter at Hanover, January 27, 1817; Trinity Chapel, at Hopkinton, February 16, 1807; Washington Chapter, in Portsmouth, November, 1815; Cheshire Chapter, at Keene, May 4, 1816; (2) and at this session the warrants were confirmed June 7, 1816. (4)

 

The Grand Chapter of New Hampshire was organized on June 10, 1819,

 

and the General Grand Chapter was duly notified by John Harris, of New Hampshire, August 21, 1819, and the Grand Chapter was recognized by the General Grand Chapter at the session held September 9, 1819. (5) The General Grand High-Priest issued a Warrant to Union Mark Lodge, No. 1, in Claremont, July 3, 1818 (6) which subsequently passed under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of New Hampshire.

 

New Jersey.

 

The first official notice we find of the introduction of capitular Masonry in New Jersey, is in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter for June 6, 1816.

 

The General Grand Scribe had granted a Warrant or Charter to Washington Chapter, Newark, May 26, 1813; to Cincinnati Mark Lodge, No. 1, Hanover, April, 1811; and to Union Mark Lodge, No. 2, Orange. (7)

 

At the triennial meeting, held September 16, 1826, the report of the General Grand High-Priest stated that a dispensation had been granted by him to Franklin Chapter, No. 3, and a Charter was granted. (8)

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1874, p. 41 (2) Ibid., P. 41.

 

(3) There were no meetings of General Grand Chapter between 1806 and 1816.

 

(4) “Compendium,” fifth meeting of General Grand Chapter of United States, p. 56.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 55.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 60.

 

(7) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter for 1797 to 1856, p. 45.

 

(8) Ibid., p. 78.

 

 

 

A special committee reported September 10th that a Charter had been granted to the State of New jersey, enabling the respective chapters therein to form and hold a Grand Chapter in the said State, by the Most Excellent General Grand High-Priest. (1)

 

At the triennial session, September 10, 1819, a communication from a Companion from the State of New jersey on the subject of forming a Grand Chapter being referred to a committee, they repored, that it appears that there are two chapters in the State of New Jersey under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, and one under the authority of the State of Pennsylvania, which does not acknowledge the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter.

 

The committee were of the opinion that a Grand Chapter could not be formed until there were three chapters acknowledging the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, which was accepted by that body. (2)

 

A dispensation was granted, September 23, 1854, to Enterprise Chapter, No. 2, at Jersey City, (3) and which was reported at the triennial meeting, September 9, 1856, and February 23, 1856, a dispensation was issued by the General Grand High-Priest to Boudinot Chapter, No. 5, at Burlington.

 

It was reported by the committee:

 

“Union Chapter, No. 1, Newark, is the only regularly Chartered Chapter now immediately subordinate to this General Grand Chapter.

 

The following chapters have been working under dispensations from the General Grand Officers from the dates of their dispensations to this time, viz. : Enterprise, No. 2, jersey City; and Boudinot, No. 5, Burlington. (5) Hiram Chapter, No. 4, Eatontown, having been recognized by the General Grand High-Priest as heretofore stated, now stands a regular subordinate on the register of this General Grand Chapter.” (6)

 

We find nothing said subsequently of the Grand Chapter of New Jersey.

 

A resolution was adopted in the General Grand Chapter at its session, September 17, 1841, that Hiram Chapter at Trenton be advised to place itself under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of the State of New York, and that said Grand Chapter be advised to legalize the proceedings of Hiram Chapter subsequent to the dissolution of the Grand Chapter of New Jersey. (7)

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1797-1856, pp. 77, 82.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 54.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 364.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 365.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 365.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 365.

 

(7) Ibid., p. 168.

 

The Deputy General Grand High-Priest issued a dispensation to Union Chapter, No. 1, for Newark, March 13, 1848, and reported the same at the triennial held September 10, 1850, and also to Newark Chapter, No. 2, March 20, 1848 both of these had charters granted September 12, 1850. (2)

 

The General Grand Secretary reported at the session held September 13, 1853, viz- : “On the 23d of litfor I received from the Deputy General Grand High-Priest a letter from the High- Priest of Newark Chapter, stating the loss of the Charter of said Chapter; which letter was endorsed by Comp. Stapleton, advising the issuing of a dispensation enabling the Chapter to continue its work; which dispensation was issued by the General Grand High-Priest.” (3)

 

It appears, however, that subsequently, September 17, 1853, Newark, No. 2 was merged into Union Chapter.

 

The peculiar condition of Royal Arch Masonyy in New jersey continued for some considerable length of time, and was not satisfactorily settled until the organization of the Grand Chapter, February 13, 1857.

 

Hiram Chapter, which, as above shown, was transferred to the jurisdiction of New York Grand Chapter, by the resolution of the General Grand Chapter, September 17, 1841, again desired to be under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter; and in July, 1853, requested of the Grand Chapter of New York to be transferred thereto.

 

At the triennial of the General Grand Chapter, the report of the General Grand Secretary shows: “Upon examining the papers which came into my possession at our last triennial meeting, after the adjournment, I found among them a petition from the officers and members of Hiram Chapter, No. 4, Eatontown, New Jersey, directed to the General Grand Chapter, dated February 3, 1852, setting forth that, that Chapter was, many years before, chartered by the Grand Chapter of New Jersey, and continued to work under said Charter, so long as that Grand Chapter was in existence.

 

That it was then ‘taken under the fostering care of the Grand Chapter of New York, to which it had ever since been subservient,’ and praying to be acknowledged and registered as one of the subordinates of this General Grand Chapter.

 

To the

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1797-1856, p. 250.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 257.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 293.

 

 

 

Petition was appended full power from the Grand Chapter of New York to the petitioner to transfer their allegiance from the Grand Chapter of New York to this General Grand Chapter.

 

That petition seems, from the endorsement upon it, in the hand writing of Compn. Swigert, who acted as my assistant, to have been referred to the Committee on Chapters and Dispensations. It is not mentioned in the proceedings.” (1) A correspondence ensued between the High-Priest of Hiram Chapter and the General Grand High-Priest Hon. R.P. Dunlap, who finally directed the General Grand Secretary to register Hiram Chapter on the roll of chapters subordinate to the General Grand Chapter, which was done November 14, 1854, and the High-Priest George Finch was duly notified thereof, and thereafter the returns were regularly made as a subordinate chapter to the General Grand Body. (2) A Charter was ordered for Hiram Chapter, September 11, 1856. (3)

 

The following chapters applied to the General Grand High-Priest for his consent to organize a Grand Chapter, viz. : Newark Chapter, No. 2; Hiram Chapter, No. 4, and Boudinot Chapter, No.

 

5. This approval was dated January 24, 1857, and the Grand Chapter was regularly organized February 13, 1857.

 

New York.

 

It is very well settled that the Royal Arch degree was conferred in that jurisdiction under lodge charters, as it was elsewhere in the colonies, and prior to the formation of the Grand Chapter for the New England States and New York in 1798.

 

A Warrant was issued by the Duke of Athol, September 5, 1781, making Rev. William Walter the Provincial Grand Master, authorizing him to form a Provincial Grand Lodge in the city of New York.

 

The first meeting of this provincial body was held December 5, 1782.

 

At that date nine lodges existed in the city, and there were six military lodges of the British Army.

 

It is supposed by some writers, and probably it was correct, that Washington Chapter, of New York, styled the “Mother Chapter,” originated in the above-mentioned Provincial Grand Lodge.

 

The early records of Washington Chapter were destroyed by fire in New York, consequently

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter for 1797 to 1856, p.

 

361.

 

(2) Ibid., 1856, p. 361.

 

(3) Ibid., 1856, p. 373.

 

 

 

Its origin is unknown.

 

It, however, granted warrants for other chapters through a nurnber of years, Hiram Chapter in Newtown, Ct., dated April 29, 1791, being the first one now known.

 

The following chapters assembled in convention in Albany, March 14, 1798, and organized and established a Deputy Grand Chapter subordinate to the Grand Chapter of the Northern States for the State of New York, viz. : Hudson, of Hudson, instituted in 1796; Temple, of Albany, instituted February 14, 1799; Horeb, of Whitestown; Hibernian, of New York City; and Montgomery, of Stillwater; dates of these three not known. Comp. Thomas Frothingham was elected Chairman and Comp. Sebastian Vischer, Secretary.

 

The constitution was read by Compn. Thomas Smith Webb, and Compn. De Witt Clinton was elected Deputy Grand High-Priest; John Hammer, Dep. Grand Secretary.

 

From the first, warrants were issued to organize Mark lodges and chapters, and prosperity attended the Royal Craft.

 

Thirty-three chapters and three Mark lodges were represented in the Grand Chapter in 1820.

 

The chapters increased to fifty-three in 1829, and sixty-one were represented in 1853;

 

while in 1839 and 1840, following the Morgan affair, about thirteen only were reported.

 

As New York is the most populous State in the Union, so also does Masonry take the lead as to numbers in all the branches in Masonry.

 

The General Grand Chapter met in the city of New York in 1816, 1819, 1826, 1829, and 1841. DeWitt Clinton served as General Grand High-Priest from 1816 to 1826; Edward Livingston, 1829 to 1835; John L. Lewis in 1865, and James M. Austin in 1868.

 

At the meeting of the Grand Chapter of the Northern States, held January 10, 1799, Section 1 of Article 1. of the Constitution was changed, and that body assumed the title of General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons for the six Northern States of America enumerated in the preamble. (1) The State organizations were, by Article II, Section I, required to drop the prefix Deputy,” and were designated as “Grand Chapters.”

 

(3)   Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1797 to 1856, p. 19, and at p. 10 at session, January 26, 1798.

 

The six are enumerated in the preamble and New York is also added.

 

North Carolina.

 

At the thirteenth meeting of the General Grand Chapter of the United States, held September 14, 1847, in the city of Columbus, O., we find the following report of the General Grand Secretary, viz. :

 

“In the State of North Carolina there is no Grand Chapter.

 

The time was when such an institution existed there as a constituent of the General Grand Chapter; but it is believed that it ceased to exist about twenty years ago.

 

There are said to be Chapters at Halifax, Tarborough, Fayetteville, and Wilmington; but they are not in correspondence with the General Grand Chapter, although some of them, if not all, were instituted under its immediate jurisdiction.”

 

“Note. – Since the foregoing was written I have received a printed copy of the Minutes of a Convention of delegates from the several chapters, by which it appears a Grand Chapter has been reorganized for the State of North Carolina.

 

Whether this organization be in strict compliance with the Constitution or not, there can be no doubt it was the intention of the chapters so to do, as the whole proceeding seems to be with a view of regaining their former position in the Confederation.”

 

We have carefully referred to the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter, from the thirteenth meeting in 1847 back to the commencement of 1797, and find that the first notice of a chapter in North Carolina was at the fourth meeting, June 6, 1816, being a special in consequence of a lapse in 1813, reported when a Charter was to have been issued to Concord Chapter, at Wilmington, May 4, 1815, by the General Grand King.

 

He had also issued a Charter to Phoenix Chapter, at Fayetteville, September 1, 1815. (1)

 

We found also that at the sixth meeting, held September 14, 1826, (2) the Deputy General Grand High-Priest, Compn. Fowle, had granted a Warrant to Wadesborough Chapter, at Wadesborough, in 1822 (no date given).

 

At this meeting there was no delegate present from North Carolina.

 

When the “Memorial” of the Grand Chapter of Kentucky was presented to the General Grand Chapter

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 46.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 72.

 

 

 

At its sixth meeting, September 14, 1826, asking for a dissolution of the latter body, it was referred to a committee, and at the same meeting the committee reported the answers of all the Grand Chapters, and North Carolina is stated as concurring with the Kentucky Grand Chapter’s resolution. (1) At the meeting of the General Grand Chapter (September 14, 1847) above referred to, the matter concerning a Grand Chapter in North Carolina being referred to a committee, the following report was made:

 

“That they have had the same under consideration and find their proceedings to be regular.

 

They assembled as appears by their printed proceedings, on the 28th of June, 1847; three chapters were represented; they proceeded to elect Officers and adopt a Constitution; in which, however, your committee would remark there appear to be several unconstitutional articles or sections, and we would respectfully recommend that the Grand Chapter of North Carolina be recognized as a legal Grand Chapter on their altering and amending their constitution to conform to that of this General Grand Chapter in the following particulars noted by your committee (2) (omitted).

 

Which recommendation was adopted.” So that the Grand Chapter of North Carolina was legally authorized September 16, 1847.

 

At the fourteenth triennial session, September 15, 1850, Companion L.L. Stephenson was present as proxy, for the Grand High-Priest. (3)

 

North Dakota.

 

After the chapters located in South Dakota, by consent of the Grand Chapter of Dakota, on January 6, 1890, had organized their Grand Chapter, on January 9th following, the representatives of Missouri, No. 6, at Bismarck; Casselton, No. 7, at Casselton; Cheyenne, No. 9, at Valley City; Keystone, No. 11, at Fargo; Jamestown, No. 13, at Jamestown; Lisbon, No. 29, at Lisbon, met in convention, and were constituted, by Companion Theodore S.

 

Parvin, by authority of a dispensation from the General Grand High-Priest, Noble D. Larner, and the Grand Chapter of North Dakota was organized in ample form with the following constituent chapters: Missouri, No. 1, at Bismarck; Casselton, No. 2, at

 

(1) “Compendium,” p. 70.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 155.

 

(3) Ibid., p. 175.

 

 

 

Casselton; Corinthian, No. 3, at Grand Forks; Cheyenne, No. 4, at Valley City; Keystone, No. 5, at Fargo; Jamestown, No. 6, at Jamestown; Lisbon, No. 7, at Lisbon.

 

The first annual convocation was held on Grand Forks, June 18, 1890.

 

The membership reported of the seven chapters was three hundred and fifty-five.

 

Ohio.

 

The very first notice of Royal Arch Masonry in Ohio is found in the proceedings of the fourth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held June 6, 1816, where it is reported that the General Grand Scribe had granted a Warrant or dispensation to Washington Chapter at Chillicothe, O., September 20, 1815, (1) which was confirmed on June 7, 1816. (2) The Committee on Examination of Credentials reported :

 

“On examination it appears that American Union Chapter, of Marietta, originated in the year 1792; that Cincinnati Chapter existed prior to the 27th of January, 1798; that Horeb Chapter had authority from the Deputy Grand High-Priest of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia dated 8th March, 1815, which Grand Chapter is in connection with the General Grand Chapter of the United States.” (3)

 

Cincinnati Chapter started the effort to form a Grand Chapter by sending an invitation to the other chapters to meet at Worthington, October 21, 1816; and on the 24th of that month the Grand Chapter was regularly organized.

 

The chapters constituting the Grand Chapter were: American Union, No. 1; Cincinnati, No. 2; Horeb, No. 3; Washington, No. 4.

 

At the fifth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held September 9, 1819, it was “ Voted, That the Grand Chapter of Ohio be now received into the Union of the State Grand Chapters, under the jurisdiction of this General Grand Chapter.” (4)

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1797-1856, p. 45.

 

(2) Ibid., P. 45.

 

(3) “History of Masonry and Concordant Orders,” p. 626.

 

The above quotation is taken from the history of the “Capitular degrees,” by Comp. Alfred F. Chapman, who stated: “On the second day of the Meeting a Committee was appointed to examine the Credentials and reported as follows : “ viz., the above quotation.

 

(4) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1797-1856, p. 52.

 

Pennsylvania.

 

Grand H.R.A. Chapter. – The first chapter of R.A. Masons formed in Pennsylvania was that working under the Warrant of Lodge No.

 

3, and its date was anterior to 1758.

 

From that period until the fall of the year 1795 all Royal Arch chapters were attached to subordinate lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge.

 

At an Extra Grand Lodge of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, held November 17, 1795, “A letter was received and read, signed by Brother Matthias Sadler, as Grand High-Priest of a Grand Royal Arch Chapter, by him said to be established under the several warrants of Lodges No. 19, 52, and 67, held in the city of Philadelphia, and, on motion, the Grand Lodge considering such action irregular, suspended the warrants of the three lodges named until the next Grand Communication.

 

At an adjourned meeting of the Grand Lodge, held November 23, 1795, the committee appointed on the 17th of same month to take into consideration the action of Lodge 52, etc., reported fully on the matter and offered the following resolutions, which were adopted :

 

“’Whereas, The supreme Masonic jurisdiction over all Lodges of Ancient York Masons, held in Pennsylvania, has uniformly been and is duly and legally vested in the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania;

 

“’And whereas, The number of Royal Arch Masons is greatly increased, insomuch that other Chapters are established in this city and in other parts of Pennsylvania;

 

“’And whereas.

 

It was always contemplated that such Chapters, regularly held, should be under the protection of this Grand Lodge;

 

“’And whereas.

 

It is the prevailing wish of the Royal Arch Masons within this jurisdiction that a Royal Arch Grand Chapter should be opened under the authority of this Grand Lodge.

 

Be it therefore, and it is hereby resolved, that a Grand Royal Arch Chapter be opened under the immediate sanction of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.”’

 

At a meeting ot tne Grand Lodge, held March 5, 1798, “Rules and Regulations for the government of the Grand Holy Royal Arch Chapter, held under the protection of, and supported by the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, unanimously agreed to and established a Grand Chapter, held in Philadelphia, February 24, 1798,” were confirmed.

 

In the declaration, preceding these rules and regulations, was the following:

 

“Ancient Masonry consists of four degrees, the three first of which are that of the Apprentice, the Fellow Craft, and the sublime degree of Master; and a brother being well versed in these degrees, and having discharged the offices of his lodge, particularly that of Master, and fulfilled the duties thereof with the approbation of the brethren of his lodge, is eligible, on due trial and examination by the Chiefs of the Chapter to whom he shall have applied, and by them found worthy of being admitted to the fourth degree, The Holy Royal Arch.”

 

The first of the rules declared:

 

“That no Chapter of Holy Royal Arch shall be held or convened within the commonwealth of Pennsylvania or Masonic jurisdiction thereunto belonging, but under the authority and sanction of a regular subsisting warrant granted by the Grand Lodge according to the old institutions, and by the consent of said lodge first signified to the Grand Chapter.”

 

Subsequently the degrees of Mark Master and Most Excellent Master were permitted to be conferred (so as to enable Companions of Pennsylvania to enter chapters in other States), but the conferring of them was not to be considered as a recognition of them as degrees of Ancient York Masonry.

 

This state of affairs continued until May 17, 1824, when the dependent Grand Chapter to the Grand Lodge was closed sine die.

 

And on the same day, “At a meeting of the Companions of the Holy Royal Arch, convened at the Masonic Hall,” it was “Resolved, That the Companions now present do organize themselves into a Grand Holy Royal Arch Chapter,” and on the 24th of the same month officers were elected, Companion Michael Nisbet being the first Grand High-Priest of the Independent Grand Chapter, and which now controls all the degrees of its sister Grand Chapters with the exception of that of Past Master, which the Grand Lodge still controls.

 

The Grand Chapter of Pennsylvania is not a constituent of the General Grand Chapter of the United States.

 

Rhode Island.

 

Washington Chapter, “Mother,” of New York, gave a Charter to Providence Royal Arch Chapter, September 3, 1793, and was with the other chapters in the organization of the Grand Chapter of Rhode Island, March 12, 1798.

 

This Grand Chapter took part in the organization of the General Grand Chapter (1) and continued therewith until the war period (1861-65), and as the General Grand Chapter’s sessions were thereby interrupted, this Grand Chapter, as well as some others, held that in consequence of the non-attendance at the regular sessions, the General Grand Chapter had been dissolved, and the Grand Body remained out of the Union until the session held October 12, 1897, when she again sent her representatives and rejoined the Union.

 

This action was resolved upon at the ninety-ninth annual convocation of the Grand Chapter of Rhode Island, held March 9, 1897. (2)

 

South Carolina.

 

A Warrant was granted by the Grand Chapter of New York, February 1, 1803, to Carolina Chapter, in Charleston. (3) At the third regular meeting of the General Grand Chapter, January 9, 1806, the Gencral Grand Officers reported having granted a Warrant for a chapter at Beaufort, S.C., by the name of Unity Chapter, which was then confirmed. (4) The dispensation for this chapter had been issued March 1, 1805.

 

In consequence of the war with Great Britain there was no meeting of the General Grand Chapter until 1816, which was the fourth, being a special.

 

At the meeting of 1806 a petition for a chapter in Charleston, by Bryan Sweeny and others, was presented and refused, because it was not recommended by any adjacent chapter.

 

(5)

 

The Grand Chapter for the State of South Carolina was instituted May 29, 1812.

 

We can not find any reference to the organization of the Grand Chapter of South Carolina in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter; but at the fourth meeting, held

 

(1) “Compendium of Proceedings General Grand Chapter of United States,” p. 8.

 

(2) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1897, P. 29.

 

(3) Proceedings Grand Chapter of New York in “History of Masonry and Concordant Orders,” p. 629.

 

(4) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1806, p. 30.

 

(5) Ibid., p. 31.

 

 

 

June 6, 1816, Thos. Smith Webb is reported as proxy for Wm.

 

Voung, the Grand High-Priest, and Foster Burnet as proxy for Benj. Phillips, Grand Scribe; therefore, that Grand Chapter was duly recognized as a constituent of the General Grand Chapter.

 

We must presume that during the war period, as was reported to the General Grand Chapter, “the situation of the country was such at that time as to render it highly inconvenient for the General Grand Chapter to convene.” (1) This Grand Chapter was also represented at the meetings held in 1826 and 1829, and not again until 1844, and then not until 1859.

 

During the years 1861 to 1865 that Grand Chapter refused to withdraw its allegiance: “And, by a resolution adopted in 1861, the oaths of office and of initiation have included allegiance to the General Grand Chapter,” was stated with pride, in the sessions of 1862-65 by Albert Mackey, General Grand High-Priest and Past Grand High-Priest of the Grand Chapter of South Carolina. (2)

 

South Dakota.

 

When it was decided by the chapters of Dakota Grand Chapter to organize two Grand Chapters, viz., for North and South Dakota, a convention was held by all the chapters located in South Dakota.

 

There were present the representatives of the following chapters, viz.: Yankton, No. 1, at Yankton; Aberdeen, No. 14, at Aberdeen; Mitchell, No. 16, at Mitchell; Brookings, No. 18, at Brookings; Orient, No. 19, at Flandreau; Rabboni, No. 23, at Webster.

 

Companion Theodore S. Parvin was present, and by authority of a dispensation issued to him, as Deputy, by General Grand High-Priest Noble D. Larner, which was confirmed by the then General Grand High-Priest David F. Day, he constituted the Grand Chapter of South Dakota in ample form.

 

Tennessee.

 

March 2, 1818, the General Grand High-Priest issued a dispensation to Cumberland Chapter, in Nashville, Tenn., (3) which received a Charter at the session of the Gencral Grand Chapter, September 11, 1819. (4)

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1816, p. 41.

 

(2) Ibid., 1865, p. 11 (3) Ibid., 1819, p. 60.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 60.

 

 

 

At the meeting held September 15, 1826, it was reported that dispensations had been issued to the following chapters, viz. : Franklin Chapter, at Franklin, March 25, 1824; Clarksville Chapter, at Clarksville, December 11, 1824; LaFayette, at Columbia, January 5, 1825.

 

At the same session charters were ordered to be issued. (1) At the session September 16, 1826, the Grand Chapter of Tennessee was regularly recognized as having been duly organized and constituted, (2) and became a constituent of the General Grand Chapter.

 

Texas.

 

At the meeting of the General Grand Chapter, held December 1835, an application was made by Comps. Samuel M. Williams, James H. C.

 

Miller, and others associated with them, for a Charter to constitute a chapter of Royal Arch Masons in Texas. (3) The committee, to whom this was referred, recommended, December 9th, that a Warrant or Charter be issued to them by the name of San Filipe de Austin, Royal Arch Chapter, No. 1. (4)

 

At the meeting held in 1850, Austin Chapter, No. 6, petitioned to have the name changed to Lone Star, No. 6.

 

At the meeting of General Grand Chapter, September 14, 1850, the following chapters received charters, the General Grand King having reported that dispensations had been issued to them by him, viz. :

 

Name

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation

 

Charter Granted

 

Washington Chapter, No. 2. May 5, 1848......September 12, 1850 Jerusalem Chapter, No. 3...March 10, 1849...Dispensation contd Trinity Chapter, No. 4... .March 14, 1848...Dispensation contd Brenham Chapter, No. 5.... April 14, 1849...September 12, 1850 Austin changed to Chapter, No. 6. April 14, 1849...September 12, 1850 Lone Star San Jacinto Chapter, No. 7. January 22, 1850.Dispensation contd Washington changed to Chapter, No. 8

 

No date, 1850....September 13, 1850 Brazos Rising Star Chapter, No. 9

 

February, 1850...September 14, 1850

 

Those chapters in the above table having their dispensations continued were recommended and authorized to surrender them,

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1826, p. 78.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 82.

 

(3) Ibid., 1835, p. 129.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 133 (5) Ibid., 1850, pp. 252, 257, 258, 268, 272.

 

 

 

And receive charters from the Grand Chapter of that State, if one be organized previous to the next meeting of the General Grand Chapter.

 

“The First Grand Chapter of the Republic of Texas was formed by a convention of Royal Arch Masons, delegates from San Filipe de Austin Chapter, of Galveston; Cyrus Chapter, of Matagorda; Lone Star Chapter, of Austin, and Rising Star Chapter, of San Augustine.

 

The Convention met in the city of Austin on the 14th of December, 1841.” (1)

 

The Grand Chapter was organized and the constitution adopted.

 

San Filipe de Austin Chapter declined to sign the constitution and withdrew from the convention.

 

The constitution was adopted and ratified on December 21, 1841.

 

It was signed by B.

 

Gillespie, Grand High-Priest, and attested by H.W. Raglin, Grand Secretary. Compn. George Lopas, the Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter of Texas, in 1895, was instructed to prepare a reprint of the proceedings of the Grand Chapter, which be accomplished, and the valuable results of his labors appear in two beautiful volumes, from which we are enabled to gain all the information as to the condition of capitular Masonry in the State of Texas.

 

It is probable that no convocation was held in 1842.

 

The proceedings of 1844 to 1849 included, as also the original constitution, were printed and given verbatim in the reprint.

 

The Grand Chapter met in 1848, but the proceedings were not printed.

 

When, “for the sake of peace and harmony among the Craft,” this Grand Chapter was dissolved, there were nine chapters, viz. : Cyrus, No. 1, at Matagorda; Lone Star, No. 3, at Austin; Rising Star, No. 4, at San Augustine: Washington, No. 5, at Washington; De Witt Clinton, No. 6, at Clarksville; Jerusalem, No. 7, at Alta Mira (Fanthorp’s) ; Houston, No. 8, at Houston; Brenham, No. 12, at Brenham, and Trinity, No. 13, at Crockett.

 

The compiler, Compn. Lopas, was unable to account for the missing Nos. 2, 9, 10, 11 and was unable to learn of their names or locations. (2)

 

The chapter San Filipe de Austin, No. 1, to be located at San Filipe de Austin, in consequence of unforeseen events was never opened at that place, but was opened at Galveston, June 2, 1840, four years and a half later.

 

This was reported to the General Grand

 

(1) “Historical Sketch,” by George Lopas, Grand Secretary, 1897, p. 3.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 3.

 

 

 

Chapter in 1844, and, on September 12th, by a resolution adopted, the removal was approved. (1)

 

A certain Scotchman, Dugald McFarlane, organized a chapter in Matagorda, in 1837, and named it Cyrus Chapter, having neither Warrant or Charter.

 

Doubts having arisen as to its legality, in 1841, they petitioned the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas for a dispensation to open a chapter.

 

A dispensation was issued to them December 10, 1841.

 

At the same time dispensations were also issued to Rising Star Chapter, at San Augustine, and Lone Star Chapter, at Austin. (2)

 

After the organization of the Grand Chapter they addressed a memorial to the Grand Lodge of Texas, and after setting forth certain reasons litfore, respectfully asked the Grand Lodge “to relinquish and surrender all jurisdiction and control over the Royal Arch Chapters and Royal Arch Masons in the Republic of Texas upon the surrender of the dispensations heretofore granted by your worshipful body.” (3)

 

This was granted by the Grand Lodge of Texas.

 

All the irregularities of these chapters in Texas in the early years were respectively cured by the action of the General Grand Chapter in the one case of San Filipe de Austin Chapter, and the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas as to the other chapters.

 

The General Grand Chapter, however, did not recognize the Grand Chapter of Texas as having been regularly constituted, as they had not asked permission to organize from that body, and the General Grand Chapter decided to suppress it by mild means.

 

In 1847 they passed a resolution forbidding Royal Arch Masons under that jurisdiction from holding Masonic intercourse with the Grand Chapter of Texas, its subordinates, and those acknowledging its authority.

 

“At the formation of the Grand Chapter of Texas in the city of Galveston, December 30, 1850, the following chapters were represented: San Filipe de Austin, No. 1, chartered by the General Grand Chapter, December 9, 1835; Washington, No. 2, Brenham, No. 5, and Brazos, No. 8.

 

“Of the Chapters organized by authority of the General Grand Chapter, all but San Filipe de Austin, No. 1, surrendered their authority

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, p. 191.

 

(2) Ruthven’s Reprint,” p. 101.

 

(3) Ibid., vol. i., p. 112.

 

 

 

From the General Grand Chapter to the Grand Chapter of Texas, and received their charters, dated June 25, 1851, and signed by the Grand Officers elected at the second annual convocation in the town of Huntsville, June 24, 1851.”

 

“San Filipe de Austin, No. 1, never received a charter from the Grand Chapter of Texas until June 22, 1860.”

 

“Many of the Companions who belonged to Chapters under the First Grand Chapter of the Republic of Texas, believing the action of the General Grand Chapter in regard to Royal Arch Masonry in Texas unwarranted and unjust, refused to be ‘healed’ under the new organization, and were thereby debarred from enjoying the privileges for which they had worked so earnestly and long.

 

Others accepted the situation until such time as they should be able to sever an alliance that was unsought and always distasteful.”

 

“The time came in 1861, when, on the 17th of June, the Grand Chapter adopted the following resolution :

 

“Resolved, That all connection between this Grand Chapter and the General Grand Chapter of the United States is dissolved and forever annihilated by the separation of our State from that government.” (1)

 

The Grand Chapter of Texas has steadily refused all overtures from the General Grand Chapter to return to the fold from which she withdrew in 1861. Tempus lit omnia” (Time cures all things), and we feel assured that, with the passing away of the present generation, with its prejudices, so will pass away that feeling in the Grand Chapter of Texas which now keeps her out of the fold, especially as some of her best members never left the General Grand Body.

 

Utah

 

December 13, 1872, Utah Chapter, No. 1, Salt Lake City, had a dispensation issued, and a Charter was granted November 25, 1874.

 

(2) A dispensation was issued for Ogden Chapter, No. 2, at Ogden, March 11, 1881; and Ontario, No. 3, at Park City, October 26, 1882; and charters to these two were granted August 15, 1883. (3) Utah has no Grand Chapter, and is under the control of the General Grand Chapter.

 

(1) “Historical Sketch,” P. 7.

 

(2) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1870 p. 56.

 

(3) Ibid., 1883, pp. 96, 97.

 

 

 

Vermont.

 

The first notice of Royal Arch Masonry we have is in the proceedings of the General Grand Chapter, at its third regular meeting, held January 9, 1806, where it is stated that a communication from Rutland in the State of Vermont, signed by Nicholas Goddard, Grand Secretary, was presented, informing the General Grand Chapter of the formation of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter in the State of Vermont, etc. (1) At this first day of the meeting the General Grand Chapter, by resolution, admitted the said Grand Chapter of Vermont into union with that body. (2)

 

From the records of the Grand Chapter of New York we learn that a Warrant for a Mark Master Mason’s Lodge was granted at Bennington, January 30, 1799.

 

Also that the Deputy Grand High- Priest issued a dispensation to Jerusalem Chapter, in Vergennes, March 25, 1805; and the Grand Chapter granted it a Charter, February 5, 1806. (3)

 

A Grand Chapter was organized in Vermont, December 20, 1804, but there is no record to be found when, nor by whom, Royal Arch Masonry was introduced into the State.

 

From the proceedings of the Grand Chapter of New York we also learn that in February, 1805, the matter of the formation of a Grand Chapter in Vermont was under consideration, and it was the opinion that there ought to be at least three regular Royal Arch Chapters to form a Grand Chapter, and also they say that “your Committee have had authentic evidence from respectable sources, that there were but three members at the formation of the aforesaid Grand Chapter.” (4)

 

A protest was made against the effort to form the Grand Chapter; nevertheless we find that the General Grand Chapter did recognize the organization of that Grand Chapter, as above stated.

 

The last annual convocation was held in 1832, six years after the great anti-Masonic excitement commenced, Compn. Nathan B. Haswell (Blessed be his memory) being then Grand High-Priest, who also was present at the triennial convocation of the General Grand Chapter in 1832.

 

At the session of 1844 Compn. Haswell said:

 

“At the last triennial meeting of your body in New York I had

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1806, p. 39.

 

(2) Ibid., P. 29.

 

(3) “History of Masonry and Concordant Orders,” p. 633.

 

(4) Ibid., p. 633.

 

 

 

The honor to present a communication giving an account of the state of Masonry in Vermont.

 

In accordance with a duty I owe the fraternity and in behalf of many good and true Masons in my State I have now further to report that nothing has occurred since that period to warrant the resuming of our Masonic labors.

 

“In no State of our Union has the anti-Masonic spirit gained so strong a foothold as in Vermont.

 

Although she has been divested of the political power that for years worked her curse, still her old leaders continue restless and troublesome; and under the abolition excitement which now pervades the State they still exert a secret influence hostile to our institution, which time, patience, and perseverance can alone conquer.

 

“Mortifying and unpleasant as it is to be compelled by the continued force of circumstances to suspend our Masonic labors, prudence dictates a course so important to the well-being and future welfare of the whole fraternity.

 

“We look forward, however, to a period when we can peacefully resume them and when public opinion shall do us justice, and sanction a course thus adopted; then shall our obscure but not lost Pleiad again break forth, diffusing new light and heat, in the Masonic Constitution [Constellation perhaps]. (1)

 

“We now ask your fraternal advice in our difficult movements.

 

And in behalf of the Companions and brethren in Vermont, whose fidelity has never been shaken, I submit this report.

 

“NATHAN B. HASWELI, High-Priest and Grand Master.”

 

In February, 1848, Jerusalem Chapter, No. 2, was reopened by a dispensation from the General Grand Scribe.

 

The Grand Lodge of Vermont was revived in 1847; and soon following this event the Companions of the Grand Chapter made a movement toward the revival of the Grand Chapter, and under the direction of Companion Haswell, who was the last Grand High-Priest, and sanctioned by the Deputy-General Grand High-Priest, the Grand Chapter was reorganized July 18, 1849.

 

There were three chapters which took part in the reorganization: Jerusalem, No. 2, at Vergennes; Burlington, No. 12, at Burlington and LaFayette, No. 15, at East Berkshire.

 

(3)   Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1844, pp. 183, 184.

 

 

 

In October, 1849, the Grand High-Priest granted a renewal of the Charter to Champlain Chapter, at St. Albans.

 

June 11 1850, an attested copy of the original Charter of this chapter was shown in the Grand Chapter with proof of original Charter having been dearoyed by fire.

 

Champlain Chapter paid $25, under the ruling, and was revived and represented at that grand convocation.(1)

 

Since that period the Grand Chapter has continued to be represented in the General Grand Chapter.

 

Virginia

 

The introduction of Royal Arch Masonry into Virginia in 1753 was no doubt similar to its introduction into Pennsylvania and other States north of it, by means of Royal Arch lodges, so-called, because the Royal Arch degree was permitted to be conferred under the lodge Charter, and we have recently seen the discovery by Bro. S.J. Quinn, of Fredericksburg, of the fact that in that ancient town there was such a lodge, in which the Royal Arch degree was conferred, earlier than in any other place in the colonies; and very soon after that degree had been introduced into the work of the lodges in England.

 

It has been said, by others, that the introduction of the Royal Arch degree into Virginia was by Bro. Joseph Myers, who was the successor of Da Costa, who had opened, under the authority of Bro. Michael Moses Hayes, a Sublime Grand Lodge of Perfection in 1783, at Charleston, S.C. Bro.

 

Myers subsequently settled in Richmond, Va., and then and there introduced the Holy Royal Arch of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, which was taught in Virginia until 1820, when the ritual of the English degree was adopted, whose officers consisted of High-Priest, King, and Scribe, while the former were High-Priest, Captain of the Host, and Captain General.

 

Bro. John Dove, in his history of the Grand Chapter of Virginia, uses the following language :

 

“Royal Arch Masonry was taught and practiced in this State during the latter part of the last century, under the authority of a Master’s Warrant, until the want of some specific legislation seemed

 

(3)   “History of Masonry and Concordant Orders,” p. 633.

 

 

 

Evidently indicated for the internal government of the Royal Arch Chapters, which were then growing in number and increasing in members.”

 

This was in the early part of 1806, and from his acknowledged intellectual ability, in connection with the record of his constant attendance at every meeting of the Grand Chapter of Virginia from December 17, 1818, to December 17, 1868, he was well qualified to decide with authority.

 

In discussing the matter of substitutes he said: “We have been in the constant use of them since 1792, and have as yet seen no evil result therefrom.”

 

From the date above mentioned by Comp. Dove, viz., 1792, when the Royal Arch was conferred, we may be safe in our statement that as early as 1792 Royal Arch Masonry was practiced in Virginia.

 

We also, from his statement, may be assured that in Virginia the degree of Past Master was in the chapter series and had been in Virginia since 1790, and whatever may have been the full ritual under lodge warrants, it was practiced until 1820.

 

At a convocation of the Grand Chapter of Virginia, held January 7, 1820, it was “Resolved, That our enlightened Companion, James Cushman, H.-P. of Franklin Chapter, No. 4, Connecticut, be requested to exemplify the mode of work at present adopted by the General Grand Chapter of the United States, it appearing from his credentials that he is fully competent.”

 

On January 18, 1820, the degree of Mark Master, Past Master, Most Excellent Master, and Royal Arch Mason were exemplified by him and after “most solemn deliberation” were adopted, “that harmony and unity should prevail throughout the Masonic world, and more especially the United States.”

 

From 1820 until December 17, 1841, the council degrees of Royal and Select Masters were controlled by a Grand Council.

 

At the latter date, by mutual agreement, these degrees were placed under the control of the Grand Chapter, and the following resolutions give the order of succession :

 

“Resolved, That hereafter the degrees in subordinate chapters be given in the following order, to wit : Mark Master, Past Master, Most Excellent Master, Royal Master, Select Master, and Royal Arch.” May 1, 1808, the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Virginia was established, in compliance with a proposition from a convention held in “Norfolk Borough,” when it appeared that the “Grand United Chapter of Excellent and Superexcellent Masons of Norfolk had proposed to the Royal Arch Chapters of Richmond, Staunton, and Dumfries to establish a Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter for the State of Virginia.”

 

This movement was entirely independent of the General Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the United States, and that Grand Chapter has always held aloof from the General Grand Body.

 

The Supreme Grand Chapter established Magnolia Chapter, No. 16, at Appalachicola, and Florida Chapter, No. 32, at Tallahassee, Fla., which united with the other chapters in Florida in forming the Grand Chapter of that State.

 

Washington.

 

November 1, 1869, a dispensation was granted to Seattle Chapter, No. 1, in Seattle. (1) A dispensation was granted to Walla Walla Chapter, No. 2, in Walla Walla, February 13, 1871. Charters were granted at the meeting of General Grand Chapter, September 20, 1871. (2)

 

From difficulties encountered within the first chapter it did not succeed, and its Charter was suspended by the General Grand High-Priest, May 25, 1873, and reported by him at the meeting held November 2, 1874. (3) The report of the committee to whom this action had been referred, as also a memorial from members of that chapter, recommended that the action of the General Grand High-Priest be approved; and that the memorial be referred to that officer with power to restore or arrest the Charter of said chapter, as in his judgment he may deem best for the interest of Royal Arch Masonry. (4)

 

On August 27, 1880, the Charter was declared forfeited and that number (1) of said chapter be assigned to Walla Walla Chapter.

 

(5)

 

A dispensation was granted to Spokane Chapter, No. 2, at Spokane Falls, November 1, 1881; and one to Seattle, No. 3, at Seattle January 2, 1833.

 

At the meeting August 15, 1883, charters were granted to both of these chapters. (6)

 

A convention having been called to meet at Spokane Falls, June 6, 1884, the General Grand High-Priest decided that a letter of a

 

(1) Proccedings Grand Chapter, 1871, p. 33.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 33.

 

(3) Ibid., 1874, p. 15 (4) Ibid., p. 55 (5) Ibid., 1880, p. 69.

 

(6) Ibid., 1883, p. 97.

 

 

 

Should first have been obtained before holding a convention, and gave his authority to hold a convention at Walla Walla October 2, 1884. (1) (May 10, 1884, the General Grand High-Priest had granted a dispensation to Tacoma Chapter, No. 4, which by order passed to the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter.)

 

This convention was held at that date by the three chapters above mentioned.

 

West Virginia.

 

After the State of West Virginia was erected and the Grand Lodge of the new State had been regularly organized, May 11, 1865, the Companions of the various chapters, numbering nine, who were under the Constitution of the Grand Chapter of Virginia, deemed it proper to follow the example of the lodges, and organize a Grand Chapter for the new territory.

 

This movement started in Wheeling Union Chapter, No. 19, Wheeling.

 

A memorial was issued by Wheeling Union Chapter, which sought permission to organize a Grand Chapter for the State.

 

The following chapters approved the memorial: Jerusalem Chapter, No. 55, in Parkersburg, November 17, 1870; Star of the West Chapter, No. 18, at Point Pleasant, November 21, 1870; and Nelson Chapter, No. 26, at Morgantown, November 30, 1870.

 

The Grand Chapter of Virginia took action upon the memorial, December, 1870, and gave consent, “upon the same terms and conditions, and with the same limitations, as the consent of the Grand Lodge of Virginia was given to the formation of a Grand Lodge for the State of West Virginia.”

 

A convention was held November 16, 1871, in Wheeling, and the four chapters above mentioned were represented by their delegates; in addition to these were delegates from Lebanon Chapter, No. 9, at Martinsburg.

 

The Grand Chapter of West Viyginia was duly and constitutionally instituted, the Grand Officers were chosen and installed by Most Excellent John P.

 

Little, Grand High-Priest of the Grand Chapter of Virginia, who took occasion to warn the Companions against a union with the General Grand Chapter. (2) This warning, like that which oftentimes only excites the curiosity

 

(1) Proceedings Grand Chapter, 1886, P. 20.

 

(2) “Masonic History of Concordant Orders,” p. 636.

 

 

 

Of the Warnee, has had the effect of bringing the Grand Chapter of West Virginia into the fold, which we trust will be followed by the Mother of the Old Dominion.

 

Wisconsin.

 

The Deputy-General Grand High-Priest, at the triennial meeting of the General Grand Chapter held September 10, 1844, reported having granted a dispensation to two chapters in Wisconsin Territory, viz. : February 16, 1844, to Milwaukee, No. 1; and Washington, No. 2, in Plattesville, July 2, 1844. (1) At the meeting September 14, 1847, the same officer reported having issued a dispensation to Southport Chapter, No. 3, in Southport (no date); (2) and also that his proxy had consecrated Washington Chapter, No. 2, at Plattesville, a Charter having been granted to said chapter, September 11, 1844. (3) A Charter was granted to Southport, No. 3, at the meeting held September 17, 1847. (4)

 

By authority of the Deputy-General Grand High-Priest under date of January 10, 1850, a convention was held in Madison of the delegates of the three chapters, and the Grand Chapter of Wisconsin was duly constituted, February 14, 1850.

 

The Deputy-General Grand High-Priest having received officially the printed proceedings and grand constitution under date of July 5, 1850, he authorized Argulus W. Stark to install the Grand Officers, which was done August 7, 1850.

 

Wyoming

 

At the triennial meeting of the General Grand Chapter held September 19, 1871, the General Grand High-Priest reported that he had issued a dispensation to a constitutional number of Companions to form a chapter at Cheyenne, Wyoming Territory, under the name of Wyoming Chapter, No. 1, (5) which was chartered, September 20, 1871. (6)

 

Evanston Chapter, No. 2, at Evanston, received a dispensation dated April 25, 1876; (7) and Lebanon, No. 8, at Laramie City, had

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1844, p. 182.

 

(2) Ibid., 1847, p. 209.

 

(3) Ibid., 1844, p. 185, note.

 

(4) Ibid., 1847, p. 228.

 

(5) Ibid., 1871, p. 15.

 

(6) Ibid., p. 33.

 

(7) Ibid., 1877, p. 92.

 

 

 

A dispensation granted March 15, 1877; and these two had charters granted August 24, 1877. (1)

 

Garfield Chapter, No. 4, at Rawlins, had a dispensation issued March 25, 1884; and a Charter granted October 1, 1886. (2) These chapters are under the immediate jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, never having organized a Grand Chapter.

 

CHRONOLOGICAL MEMORANDA OF IMPORTANT TRANSACTIONS OF THE GENERAL GRAND CHAPTER!

 

October 24, 1797. – Preliminary meeting of three chapters in Boston, Mass.

 

January 24, 1798. – Organization of the “Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the Northern States of America.” September, 1798. – First meeting after organization for the choice of

 

Officers.

 

January 9, 1799. – Adjourned meeting; change of name to that of General Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the Northern States of America.

 

January 9, 1806. – Change of name to that of General Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons for the United States of America.

 

September, 1812, was, by resolution, fixed as the time, and New York City as the place, for the next Septennial Session.

 

June 6, 1816. – Held in New York City, by reason of failure to meet in 1812.

 

Constitution changed, so as to have a Depay General Grand High-Priest.

 

September, 1819. – Held agreeably to adjournment.

 

February, 1823. – Adjournment was to Washington, District of Columbia, at this time, but not held.

 

September, 1826. – Met according to previous notice. Meetings made triennial.

 

November, 1832. – Held in this month on account of cholera in Baltimore during September.

 

September, 1862. – Appointed to meet at Memphis, Tenn., but not held on account of Civil War then prevailing.

 

September, 1871 – Constitution amended, admitting Past Grand High-Priests as permanent members.

 

November, 1874. – Constitution amended, making the first four Past General Grand Officers permanent members.

 

October 13, 1897. – Centennial Celebration at Baltimore, Md.

 

(1) Proceedings of General Grand Chapter, 1877, pp. 92, 93.

 

(2) Ibid., 1886, p. 125.

 

(3) Ibid., 1897.

 

P. 1548

 


 

CHAPTER LVII

 

HISTORY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF FREEMASONRY INTO EACH STATE AND TERRITORY OF THE UNITED STATES

 

The Cryptic Degrees

 

In the Freemason's Library and General Ahiman Rezon, by Samuel Cole, P.M., published in Baltimore in 1826, we find a list of forty-three degrees which was taken from a "late publication, 1816," which the author states are conferred in the Sublime Grand Lodges in Charleston, S. C., in the city of New York, and in Newport, R.I., which we have heretofore quoted.

 

"Besides those degrees, which are in regular succession, most of the Inspectors are in possession of a number of detached degrees, given in different parts of the world, and which they generally communicate, free of expense, to those brethren who are high enough to understand them. Such as Select Masons, of 27, and the Royal Arch, as gnven under the Constitution of Dublin, etc., etc."

 

In a description of the degree of Select Master, the writer says: There is reason to believe that this degree was in use long before those of Most Excellent or Mark Master." (1)

 

It is well enough to quote from the charge to a Select Master, to indicate its proper place in the "curriculum" of the degrees: "Companion - Having attained to this degree, you have passed the circle of perfection in Ancient Masonry." (2)

 

This indicates that the Select degree closed all the degrees appertaining to the "Secret Vault," as it really did, up to 1826 at least.

 

The edition of the above work of 1817 contains an article by Hezekiah Niles on the Select degree, in which he says : "Though this beautiful Degree is known to some persons in many parts of the

 

(1) Freemason's Library," Cole, p. 220.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 223.

 

 

 

United States, we are not informed that it is worked anywhere but in Baltmore. We have been told that a regular Chapter of Select was held at Charleston, S.C., many years ago, but believe it has declined. (1)

 

Bro. John Dove of Virginia, says: "This beautiful Degree is comparatively of Modern Origin, having been, with the Degree of Royal Master, in the possession of a distinguished Chief, in the State of Maryland, as a purely honorary Degree, elucidatory of, and appendent to Royal Arch Masonry, and by him conferred without fee; he delegated authority to others, to use them, in the same way, until the year 1824, when the Grand Chapter of Maryland, with his consent, took charge of the Degrees, and ordered them to be given before the Most Excellent Master; where all intelligent workers in the Royal Arch must at once perceive the propriety of their location." (2)

 

Brother A.G. Mackey says: "For many years there have been three distinct claims urged for jurisdiction over these degrees, in America - first, by the Supreme Council of the 33d Degree; next by some of the Grand Chapters; and lastly by the Grand Councils, composed of the subordinate Councils of each State."

 

"Connected with this question of jurisdiction is another in reference to the historical origin of the Degrees, and, as the person or persons, by whom they were first introduced into America.

 

The Masons of Maryland and Virginia contend, that the Royal and Select Degrees were introduced by Philip P. Eckel, of Baltimore, one of the most distinguished and enlightened Masons of his day, who, in 1817, communicated them to Jeremy L.

 

Cross, and gave him authority to confer them in every Royal Arch Chapter which he might visit in his official character." This clearly shows that they were to be subsequent to the Royal Arch.

 

Dr. Robert Folger says: "The Masons of that day (1816) were divided in opinion concerning the proper place to which these degrees (Royal and Select) belonged.

 

One party preferred that they should be kept separate, and left where they were - a separate system."

 

At the fourth meeting of the General Grand Chapter, June 6, 1816, a discussion took place upon the proposition for the admission of the Grand Chapter of Maryland and the District of Columbia,

 

(1) Schultz's "History of Masonry in Maryland," vol. i., p. 335.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 336.


 

 

WILLIAM JAMES HUGHAN
 

 

 

 

Philip P. Eckel and Benj. Edes being the representatives of that Grand Chapter.

 

We learn from the published minutes of that meetig, that a committee made the following report:

 

"The undersigned having been appointed a Committee for the purpose of conferring with M.'. E.'. Comps.

 

Philip P. Eckel and Benjamin Edes, delegates of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of the State of Maryland, beg leave to report that they have had an interview with the above named Companions, from whom they received the following proposition, to wit : The Grand Chapter of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia is willing to support the Constitution of this General Grand Chapter.

 

It will not grant any warrants out of its District and will discountenance all chapters formed contrary to the General Grand Constitution; but requests that it shall not be forced to alter its mode of working, if any difference should exist, at present, and to be received on an equality with the other Grand Chapters.

 

"Under a consideration of all the above circumstances, your Committee recommend that the said Grand Chapter of the State of Maryland be admitted to an union with this General Grand Chapter.

 

"(Signed by the Committee).

 

The Undersigned, delegates from the Grand Chapter of Maryland and District of Columbia, agree to the above report.

 

"Signed P.P. ECKEL, G.'. H.'. P.'.

 

"BENJ. EDES."

 

This report being read and accepted, it was thereupon voted to receive the said Grand Chapter of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter. (1) Folger, referring to this meeting of the General Grand Chapter, says: "The whole matter then came up for discussion, Mr. Eckel, of Maryland, taking a very prominent part in advocating the Union of these two degrees with the services of the Royal Arch Chapter.

 

The discussion became warm and lasted the better part of two days, when the motion to unite them was rejected.

 

Whereupon, immediately after adjournment, the State Grand Council of Royal Masters was formed, and the different Councils came under that governing power, and continued so up to 1828.

 

It was this move

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Chapter, 1816, p. 44.

 

 

 

on the part of the General Grand Chapter, in refusing a recognition of those degrees, that determined Mr. Cross in his future course.

 

"Mr. Eckel, the Baltimore delegate, then went home; and when Cross, who at that session of the General Grand Chapter had been appointed and confirmed as General Grand Lecturer, started on his lecturing tour, he stopped at Baltimore and purchased and received the privilege from Eckel and Niles to erect and establish councils of Royal and Select Masters throughout the Southern and Western States. This privilege he carried out pretty effectually, beginning with New Jersey; and all the councils in existence in those States, mentioned in his narrative, were established by himself, also the Eastern States, except Rhode Island." Bro. Edw. T. Schultz, in commenting upon what Folger had published as above, said:

 

"From the above quotations it will be perceived that it was the general belief that the control of the Royal and Select Degrees were vested in Eckel and Niles.

 

"But we think Bros, Dove, Mackey, and Folger, and others, make a great mistake in coupling the Royal Master's Degree with the Select, in connection with the names of Eckel and Niles; for there is no evidence whatever to show that these Brethren ever exercised or claimed control of the Royal Master's degree, or that they were even in possession of that degree, at the periods named by them." (1)

 

From Bro. Josiah H. Drummond we learn that, on apparently good authority, Eckel did not get the Royal Master's degree until 1819; when he and Benj.

 

Edes, of Baltimore, received it from Ebenezer Wadsworth, of New York. Bro.

 

Schultz thinks "this is probably true, for there is no mention of that degree being worked in this jurisdiction (Maryland) in any document, or upon the records of the Grand Chapter or its subordinates earlier than 1850. Bro. Cole, in 1817, speaks of it incidentally, but not as among the degrees conferred." (2)

 

Cole's edition of 1826 (p. 319), says Royal Master and Ark Master or Noachite."

 

These are considered as merely preparatory, and are usually conferred immediately before the solemn ceremony of exaltation. (3) It

 

(1) Schultz, "History," vol. i-, p. 339.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 338.

 

(3) Cole, p. 319.


 

 

WARRANT TO JEREMY CROSS
 

 

 

 

will be remembered itat on page 220 of Cole we quoted him as saying that among those degrees communicated "to those brethren who are high enough to understand them, such as Select Masons of 27" and the Royal Arch, as given under the Constitution of Dublin, etc.

 

This evidently shows that even as late as 1826 these two degrees of Royal and Select were not united; and also, that the Royal Master preceded the Royal Arch; and it was most likely that the Select degree followed the Royal Arch.

 

We show herewith a facsimile copy of the original commission to Jeremy L. Cross, from Eckel and Niles.

 

To all whom it may concern

 

Imprest with a perfect conviction that a knowledge of the misteries of the degree of Royal Arch are eminently promoted by a knowledge of those revealed in the Council of Select Masons; and Whereas, the said degree of Select is not so extensively known as its wants and the good of the Craft require - Therefore Know Ye, That reposing especial confidence in my beloved and trusty Companion, Jeremy L. Cross. I do hereby, by the high powers in me vested, authorise and empower him to confer the said degree as follows (viz.): In any place where a regular chapter of Royal Arch Masons is established, the Oficers or Members approving, he may confer said degree according to its rules & regulations, but only on Royal Arch Masons, who have taken all the preceding degrees, as is required by the General Grand Chapter. When a competent number of Select Maosns are thus made, he may grant them a warrant to open a Council of Select and confer the degree and do all other business appertaining thereto.

 

Given under my hand and Seal at Baltimore, the 27th day of May, A.D. 1817, and in the year of the Dis. 2817,

 

Sigm Philip L. Eckel

 

Thrice Illustrious & Grand Puissant in the Grand Council of Select at Baltimore & Approved as G.G. Scribe.

 

Approved and attested as Ill. in the Grand Council.

 

H. Niles

 

The Select degree was recognized by the constitution of the Grand Chapter of Maryland adopted in 1824, but the Royal Master's degree is not mentioned. (1)

 

Bro. Schultz continues: "Furthermore, the Warrant granted to Cross, by Eckel and Niles, a copy of which, taken from a photograph copy of the Original, in the possession of Bro. Wm. R. Singleton, of Washington, is here inserted, and from which it will be seen that the Select Degree alone is mentioned."

 

In the first warrants issued by Cross under this commission, the Companions were empowered "to form themselves into a regular Council of Select Masters," but in the warrants issued by him in 1819 and thereafter, the High Powers in him vested, by the Grand Council at Baltimore, were enlarged to include the Royal Master's degree. (2)

 

It is well to state that from the action subsequently taken by Grand Chapter of Maryland in 1827, from documents submitted, "upon the subject of the institution of the Select Degree independent of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter," which were referred to a committee, who recommended that a circular be sent to the several Grand Chapters, regarding the matter, and which was adopted.

 

Cross was charged with having abused the "authority delegated or meant to be delegated" to him, and it had been asserted that he had been expelled by the Grand Chapter but Bro. Schultz assures us that there is nothing in the records to warrant such an assertion." Moreover, Cross did not belong to any chapter under the jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of Maryland.

 

Cross, it is said, established about thirty-three councils in various

 

(10 Schultz, p. 338.

 

(2) Ibid.

 

(3) Ibid.

 

parts of the United States.

 

He also delegated others, with power in like manner to issue warrants for councils of Royal and Select Masters.

 

"From all that has been stated, it is evident, not only that Eckel and Niles claimed to have had the supreme control and authority over the Select degree, but that this claim was generally regarded valid; and it is equally as evident, we think, that these Brethren never claimed the control of the Royal Master's degree." "It has always been a question of much interest with Masonic writers to know the source whence these Brethren received their authority, and the control of the Select degree.

 

An old document, that most unexpectedly came to the knowledge of the writer about a year ago, settles that question beyond a doubt.

 

It is as follows :

 

"Whereas, In the year of the Temple, 2792, our thrice illustrious Brother Henry Wilmans, Grand Elect, Select, Perfect Sublime Mason, Grand Inspector General, and Grand Master of Chapters of the Royal Arch, Grand Elect and Perfect Master's Lodges and Councils, Knight of the East, Prince of Jerusalem, Patriarch Noachite, Knight of the Sun, and Prince of the Royal Secret, did by and in Virtue of the powas in him legally vested, establish, ordain, erect and support a Grand Council of Select Masons in the City of Baltimore, and wrought therein, to the great benefit of the Craft, and to the profitable extension and elucidation of the Mysteries of Masonry:- and Whereas, we the subscribers to these presents are by regular succession possessors of all the rights, privileges and immunities and powers vested in any way whatsoever in the said Grand Council of Select Masons, considering the great advantages that would accrue to the Craft, in an extension of the knowledge of the Royal Secret, as introductory to, and necessary for, the better understanding of the Superior Degrees.

 

"Know all, whom it may concern, that we do hereby authorize and empower our trusty and beloved Companions K.S....K. T.... H.A.... of the same, to open and to hold a Chapter of Select Masons in the City of Baltimore and under such By-Laws and regulations as may be enacted and established for the government of the same subject to the following general rules and regulations."' (Which we omit.)

 

From some cause the dispensation was not used, but the fact is fully and emphatically stated by Eckel and Niles, under their hand and seal, that they were, "by regular succession, possessors of all the rights, privileges, and immunities and powers vested in any way whatsoever in the said Grand Council of Select Masons," which has been instituted in the city of Baltimore, in the year 1792, by Henry Wilmans, "Grand Inspector General."

 

"This document, in connection with the Rules and Regulations of the Lodge of Perfection (referred to above), leave no room for doubt that Wilmans was an Inspector of the Rite of Perfection, and that he exercised, in the City of Baltimore, in 1792, the powers claimed by such Inspectors.

 

But from whom did Wilmans acquire his powers of 'Grand Inspector General,' and the authority 'to establish, ordain, erect and support a Chapter of Select Masons?'"

 

"We regret that we can not answer the question, nor could the learned Brethren in vaious parts of the country, to whom we applied.

 

The name of Wilmans does not appear upon any register or document in the archives of the Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction, or upon any other known document or record containing the names of the early Inspectors.

 

From the fact that in both the documents he is styled 'Grand Inspector General,' while those deriving their powers from Morin are styled 'Deputy Inspectors,' led to the supposition that he might have derived his powers from Europe; acting upon which supposition, letters were addressed to the Grand Lodges at Berlin and Bremen.

 

While the result of the correspondence, which ensued, was of an interesting nature, nothing in regard to his Masonic character could be learned.

 

"It has been ascertained that Wilmans was a native of Bremen, and that he emigrated to this country as early at least as the year 1790, and settled in Baltimore.

 

The first mention of his name, on the records of the Grand Lodge, is in connection with Concordia Lodge, in 1793, of which he was appointed the first or Charter Master.

 

In the same year he was elected Deputy Grand Master and in the following year, Grand Master of Masons in Maryland.

 

The register of the Old Zion Lutheran Church, of this city, shows that he died in 1795."

 

"In a MSS. book of Moses Holbrook, of South Carolina, written in 1829, it is stated that Joseph Myers, a Deputy Inspector General, deposited in the year 1788, in the archives of the Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem at Charleston, 'a certified copy of the Royal and Select Master's degrees received from Berlin.'"

 

"This is evidently an error, so far as it relates to the Royal Master's degree.

 

As intimated, the degree was first known in the Eastern States, and the earliest reliable mention of it there, is in the year 1809." "Bro.

 

Holbrook wrote his book in 1829, at which time both degrees were conferred at Charleston, and naturally he connected the two in his statement, making a similar error that others do, when stating that Eckel and Niles claimed the control of the Royal Master's degree. The book referred to contains also the statement, that somewhere about the year 1788, Joseph Myers was for a time located at Baltimore."

 

"Did Wilmans receive the Select degree from Myers, or did Myers receive it from Wilmans?"

 

"If the degree came from Berlin, it is quite probable that Wilmans brought it with him, as he came from Germany, about the time mentioned for the deposit, in the MSS. of Holbrook."

 

"There is a tradition existing in the Eastern States, that Eckel received the degree from a Prusian, temporarily sojourning in Baltimore.

 

The period of Wilmans' residence in Baltimore was perhaps not over eight years, and with some propriety, he might have been regarded as a sojourner - and a Prussian."

 

"It is stated, but upon what authority we know not, that the Royal and Select degrees were conferred by Andrew Franken at Albany in 1769, and that he conferred them upon Samuel Stringer, who afterwards removed to Maryland; but we have not been able to find this name upon any of the records of this jurisdiction."

 

"These statements or traditions, it will be seen, all point to Maryland as the source from whence the select degree, and (as the writers will have it) Royal Master's degree also, were subsequently introduced into other parts." (1)

 

Folger says Eckcl, at the session of the General Grand Chapter, advocated "the Union of the degrees with the services of the Royal Arch Chapter."

 

"From 1824 to 1852, the Select degree only was worked in the chapters in Maryland and District of Columbia.

 

After 1852, both degrees were worked in Councils specially convened for the purpose, after the Most Excellent and prior to the Royal Arch." (2)

 

The true history of the origin and progress of the Cryptic Rite

 

(1) Schultz, "History of Maryland," vol. i., pp. 335 to 344.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 344.

 

 

 

in the several States, if it were possible to produce it, would prove of great interest to the Masonic student.

 

From the preceding pages, taken mostly from the labors of Companion Edw. T.

 

Schultz in his valuable History of Masonry in Maryland, we learn that, while the degrees of Royal Master and Select of Twenty-seven may have been conferred in various places prior to 1792, yet we must concede that the organization of the Council of Select Masons in Baltimore by Philip P.

 

Eckel and Hezekiah Niles, under the sanction of Henry Wilmans, was the very first organized effort to propagate the rite in this country.

 

Companion Schultz has shown, very clearly, that we can not go beyond the date of that organization, so far as any ancient records have been discovered.

 

After Companion Jeremy L. Cross had been appointed the Grand Lecturer of the General Grand Chapter, at the session of 1816 - we learn, from several sources, that Cross went to Baltimore in 1827 - and there, no doubt, was initiated into the degree of Select Master and recoved the Warrant from Eckel and Niles which is referred to on the preceding page of this chapter.

 

A photograph copy of the original is in the possession of the present writer.

 

This photo copy was submitted to the daughter of Bro.

 

Eckel, who was the wife of Brother, Hon.

 

Elijah Stansbury, Ex-Mayor of Baltimore, and they both certified that they recognized his signature; and, moreover, sent the writer an original letter written by Bro. Eckel in 1819.

 

These evidences were submitted to experts in handwriting, and the certificate to Cross was pronounced a forgery because the real later signature was of so much better caligraphy than the signature in the suspected paper, as, according to the expert's idea, it should not have been better, being two years older!!! The writer has in his possession several other papers signed by Eckel, and in no two of them do his signatures correspond.

 

Our duty as a historian requires this statement to be made. Our own opinion is yet, that the document shown by Cross was a veritable commission from Eckel and Niles to propagate the degree, and the Masonic World should be glad thereof; as by his means, the rite spread rapidly in the South and West.

 

The writer was made a Royal and Select Master, in one of Cross's councils, in St. Louis, Mo., in 1841, about the time the Grand Council of the State was organized, as he then copied their records into the record-book.

 

The Grand Chapter of Maryland, having incorporated the Select degree into the chapter work in 1824, in 1828 that Grand Chapter sent communications to other Grand Chapters suggesting the propriety of the several Grand Chapters in the United States assuming jurisdiction over the degrees of Royal and Select Masters.

 

In the Grand Chapter of South Carolina, this matter was referred to a committee, who reported February 26, 1829, which report was unanimously adopted by the Grand Chapter :

 

"That Committee, after extensive and careful investigation, reported, that in February, 1783, Dr. Dalcho and many others received those degrees in Charleston in the sublime Grand Lodge of Perfection, then established in that city.

 

That when the Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem was established in Charleston, February 20, 1788, Joseph Myes, one of the Deputy-Inspectors who established it, deposited in the Archives certified Copies of the degrees of Royal and Select Masters from Berlin in Prusia, to serve for the future guidance and government of that new body.

 

That from 1788, the Grand Officers and Supreme Council of Inspectors-General, at Charleston, had been steadily in the habit of conferring these degrees; and in 1828, numbers of councils of Select Masters were acting under their authority in the Southern and Western States.

 

"The Committee had seen and perused the first copy of those degrees that ever came to America, and old copies of Charters that had been returned by Councils, in States where Grand Councils had been formed, and Charters obtained from such Grand Councils.

 

And the Committee reported, that these degrees had been under regular and independent Masonic protection and authority for more than forty-six years, and were so circumstanced in the United States, at a period long prior to the establishment of Grand or General Grand Royal Arch Chapters, or even of Chapters of Royal Arch Masons, in any part of the world; and that the Grand Chapter of South Carolina ought to avoid all collision with contemporary Masonic jurisdictions, regularly established, and much longer in existence than their own; and so reported a formal resolution (which the Grand Chapter unanimously adopted) that it was 'improper and inexpedient to assume a jurisdiction over the said degrees, and thus to interfere with the rights and privileges of our brethren in another and higher order of Freemasonry.'

 

"Of the Illustrious brothers Myers, Spitzer and Forst, that Committee said, 'the above named three respectable Brethren and Companions are, and steadily have been, Members and Officers of the said Council of Princes of Jerusalem.

 

Their evidence therefore, must be conclusive upon these points.'

 

"The same Committee (Royal Arch Masons, be it observed, and a Committee of a Royal Arch Chapter, enquiring into its own jurisdiction) said of the Brothers and Companions, Dr. F. Dalcho, Dr. Isaac Auld, Dr. James Moultrie, Senior, and Moses C. Levy, Esq., who received these degrees in Charleston in 1783, from the sublime Grand Lodge of Perfection: 'Three of the above named Brothers are still living, venerable for their years and warm attachment to the glorious cause of Freemasonry, and highly respected and esteemed for their standing in the community where they have so long honorably sojourned, and they are still members of the same Sublime Body.' There is still further testimony to be adduced. The report to the Grand Chapter, which we have quoted, was made by Compn. Moses Holbrook, its Chairman, and unanimously adopted; the Grand Chapter thus affirming, the veracity of the Masonic Witnesses, whose testimony was adduced.

 

In 1830 the same Compn., Holbrook, was M.'. P.'. Grand Commander of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors General of the 33 degree for the Southern jurisdiction of the United States at Charleston.

 

"In February, A.I. 2383, the M.'. E.'. G.'. High-Priest of the Grand Chapter of South Carolina, John H. Honour, who was then and still is (1853) M.'. P.'. W.'. Commander of the Sup.'. Council, S.'. G.'. I.'. G.'. of 33 degree, for the Southern Jurisdiction of the United States at Charleston, stated in his address to the Grand Chapter, that he had in his possession a manuscript copy of the degrees of the Royal and Select Masters, in which there was a note in the handwriting of Brother Holbrook dated March 15, 1830, in these words:

 

In Brother Snell's book is written the following:

 

"'Supreme Council Chamber, Charleston, S. C., 10th Feb., 1827.

 

"'I hereby certify that the detached degrees, called Royal and Select Master, or Select Masters of 27, were regularly given by the Sublime Grand Lodge of Perfection (No. 2 in the U.S.A.), established by Brother Isaac Da Costa, in Charleston, in Feb., 1783, one of the original Members of which Most Illustrious Brother Moses C. Levy, is still alive and a Member of it to this day, without ceasing to be so for a day; and further, that at the first establishment of a Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem, in Charleston, February, 1788, by the III.'. Dep.'. Inspectors General, Joseph Myers, B. M. Spitzer, and A. Forst, Brother Myers (who succeeded Brother Da Costa after his decease) deposited a certified copy of the Degrees from Berlin, in Prussia, to be under the guidance and fostering protection of the government of the above Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem.'

 

"Brother Myers shortly after this (Feb. 20, 1788,) resided some time in Norfolk, Richmond, and Baltimore, previous to his removal to Europe, and he communicated a knowledge of these degrees to a number of brethren in those cities.

 

The original copy is still in my keeping, and agreeably to the obligations of the same, and the Grand Constitutions governing those degrees, viz. : Royal and Select Mason Of 27, it is correct and lawful to give them either to Sublime Masons, who have arrived to the Knights of the Ninth Arch (13th) or to the Companions of the 3d Arch (Royal Arch Masons)."

 

From this statement, of those who held the control originally, it will be observed that it was the design, always, to confer, at least the Select degree, only on those who had a knowledge of the Royal Arch degree; hence to impart the mysteries of the Ninth Arch to anyone "beneath the dignity of the Royal Arch," was to invert the true order of succession, so essential in all Masonic degrees.

 

It has been asserted by some that the Cryptic degrees had been worked in this country earlier than 1783; as early perhaps as 1766 in the city of Albany, and that they were brought from France, and not from Prussia.

 

Brother Pike said in his report: (1)

 

"We can soon learn how it was that the Council degrees came about 1766 from France and not from Prussia.

 

In 1761, the lodges and Councils of the superior degrees being extended throughout Europe, Frederic II. (or the Great), King of Prussia, as Grand Commander of the Order of Princes of the Royal Secret, or 32d degre, was by general consent acknowledged and recognized as Sovereign and Supreme Head of the Scotch Rite."

 

"On the 25th October, 1762, the Grand Masonic Constitutions

 

(1) "History of Masonry and Concordant Orders," p. 649.

 

 

 

were finally ratified in Berlin, and proclaimed for the government of all Masonic bodies working in the Scotch Rite over the two hemispheres; and in the same year they were transmitted to Stephen Morin, who had been appointed, in August, 1761, Inspector General for the New World by the Grand Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, convened at Paris, under the presidency of Chaillon de Joinville, representative of Frederic, and Substitute-General of the Order.

 

It will be remembered that the 33 degree was not then created; and, under Frederic the Great, there was no rank higher than the 32 degree, nor any body superior to a Consistory.

 

When Morin arrived in the West Indies, he, agreeably to his patent, appointed M.

 

Hayes a Deputy Inspector General, with the power of appointing others when necessary.

 

It was under this authority, coming, it is true, from the Consistory of Paris held by that consistory as the delegate and representative of Frederic the Great, that the Lodges of Perfection in Albany and Charleston were established, with authority to confer these detached degrees."

 

"Many rites flourished in Europe awhile and died.

 

The French and Scotch Rites reduced the degrees practiced by their votaries, the former to seven, the Seventh being the Rose Croix, the latter to thirty-three and some auxiliary degrees.

 

By common consent it became Masonic law that the first three degrees were the joint property of all, but the others, the peculiar property of the inventors.

 

Royal Arch Masonry separated itself from 'Blue' Masonry, organized itself, invented three new degrees, and commenced an independent existence.

 

The Royal and Select Masters formed themselves into councils, and after a time they, too, organized themselves into Grand Councils, and claimed an independent existence.

 

The Supreme Council did not deny the right, but simply retained their original right to confer the degrees, and Charter councils in States where no Grand Councils have been organized."

 

The following is a copy of a decree issued by the Supreme Council A.'. A.'.

 

A.'. S.'. Rite of the Northern jurisdiction, the true copy of which was sent to the Southern jurisdiction and was presented to the writer many years since by General Albert Pike.

 

"The Supreme Grand Council of Sov. Grand Inspectors General for the Northern Masonic District and jurisdiction of the U. States of America duly, lawfully, and constitutionally assembled on the 10th day of June, 1850, at its Grand East, the City of New York, in its Supreme Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem do declare and make known as follows:

 

"That in addition to the regular series of degrees and order of the ancient and accepted rite, the said rite had, from time immemorial, been in possession of, and claims as its exclusive property, a number of detached degrees which are illustrative of, connected with, and necessarily appendant to certain degrees in said right or departments thereof: and that the Supreme Grand Council, as the sole conservators of said rite, in said Northern Jurisdiction, is sacredly bound to preserve intact and free from any amalgamation with foreign rites or Masonic Bodies, not acknowledged by us or our said rite, all and every one of the detached degrees referred to.

 

"That two of such detached degrees, called 'Royal Master' and 'Select Master,' or 'Select Masons of 27,' having in various ways and at different times fallen into the hands of persons in no way connected with the sublime system of free Masonry, or the said 'ancient and accepted rite,' have been and are now cultivated in a garbled form, by bodies styling themselves Masonic, and working under self-assumed powers and authority in this regard, claiming the right to grant charters to confer them; and, moreover, that these degrees, in some places of this jurisdiction, have become amalgamated with a Modern American rite, and are also claimed as the property of the American Royal Arch Chapters.

 

"This Supreme Grand Council therefore, as in duty bound, protests against this invasion of its rights and privileges, and further declares and makes known that the said degrees of Royal and Select Master, from their nature or character, and the history they develop, and circumstances upon which founded, can not, except in an anachronistic and improper manner be conferred disconnected from the ineffable degrees, and lodges of perfection (14th degree ancient and accepted rite) and that said degrees belong not only characteristically and historically, but legitimately, to 'Ineffable Masonry' and 'Lodges of Perfection,'and do not appertain and can not consistently and lawfully be made an appendage to any Masonic system except said 'Sublime System,' nor to any rite except said 'ancient and accepted rite.'

 

"And whereas, such assumed authority over the detached degrees aforesaid, may, as we have reason to believe in some instances, have been exercised in good faith, but without a due appreciation of our rights and prerogative in regard to them, this Supreme Grand Council for the sake of harmony is willing to confer and advise with our illustrious Brethren, the Southern Supreme Grand Council at Charleston, S. Carolina, and act in concert with them in adopting such measures in reference to those degrees, as may be mutually adjudged most feasible and proper, without infringing in any way whatever upon our Supremacy over the said degrees.

 

"'Deus meumque jus,' "J.J.J. GOURGAS, Sovereign Grand Commander of 33d" for the Northern D. and J., U.S.A.

 

JILES F. VATES, Insp. Lieut Grand Commander.

 

"N.B. - Signed on the original by Arch d Bull, Sov. Gr. Insp. General 33d; K.H. Van Rensselaer, Sov. Gr. Insp. Gen (1) 33 d, and Francis Turner, Prince of Jerusalem Rose + H.R.D.M.; K.H.; S.P.R.S, and now a member of this Supreme Grand Council.

 

"To the Supreme Grand Council of the 33 degree, ancient and accepted rite,' at their Grand East, the City of Charleston, S. Carolina.

 

"Through their Illus. Brother, Albert G. Mackey, M. D., Grand Secretary General of their H. E."

 

A true copy, W.R. SINGLETON, 33d.

 

The Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction held to the same contention until at a meeting of the Supreme Council at Baltimore, May, 1870, they surrendered all claim to these degrees.

 

Dr. Olivar, in his Historical Landmarks, (1) gives an account of the legend of the Secret Vault as discovered in the construction of theSecond Temple, as follows:

 

"The foundations of the Temple were opened, and cleared from the accumulation of the rubbish, that a level might be procured for the commencement of the building.

 

While engaged in excavations for this purpose three fortunate sojourners are said to have discovered our ancient stone of foundation, which had been deposited in the secret crypt by Wisdom, Suength, and Beauty, to prevent the communication of ineffable secrets to profane or unworthy persons.

 

"The discovery having been communicated to the prince, (2)

 

(1) Vol. ii., p. 434.

 

(2) Zerubbabel was Tirshatha (Governor).

 

 

 

prophet and priest of the Jews, the stone was adopted as the Chief Corner-Stone of the re-edified building, and thus became, in a new and more expressive sense, the type of a more excellent dispensation.

 

An avenue was also accidentally discovered, supported by seven pairs of pillars, perfect and entire, which, from their situation, had escaped the fury of the flames that had consumed the Temple, and the desolation of war that had destroyed the city.

 

"The Secret Vault, which had been built by Solomon as a secure depository for certain secrets that would have inevitably been lost without some such expedient for their preservation, communicated by a subterranean avenue with the King's palace; but at the destruction of Jerusalem, the entrance having been closed by the rubbish of falling buildings, it had been discovered by the appearance of a keystone among the foundations of the Sanctum Sanctorum.

 

A careful inspection was then made, and the invaluable secrets were placed in safe custody."

 

Brother Mackey says: (1)

 

"To support this legend there is no historic evidence and no authority except that of the Talmudic writers.

 

It is clearly a mythical symbol, and as such we must accept it.

 

We can not altogether reject it, it is so intimately and so extensively connected with the symbolism of the Lost and recovered Word, that if we reject the, theory of the Secret Vault we must abandon all of that symbolism, and with it the whole of the science of Masonic symbolism.

 

Fortunately there is ample evidence in the present appearance of Jerusalem and its subterranean topography to remove from any tacit, and as it were, conventional assent to the theory, features of absurdity and impossibility.

 

"Considered simply as a historic question, there can be no doubt of the existence of immense vaults beneath the superstructure of the original Temple of Solomon.

 

Prime, Robinson, and other writers, who in recent times have described the topography of Jerusalem, speak of the existence of these structures, which they visited, and, in some instances, carefully examined." Dr. Barclay (City of the Great King) describes in many places of his interesting topography of Jerusalem, the vaults and subterranean chambers which are to be found beneath the site of the Old Temple.

 

(1) "EncycIopoedia of Freemasonry," p. 852.

 

 

 

"In the earliest ages the cave or vault was deemed sacred.

 

The first worship was in cave-temples, which were either natural or formed by art to resemble the excavations of nature.

 

"The vault was, in the ancient mysteries, symbolic of the grave; for initiation was symbolic of death, where alone Divine Truth is to be found.

 

The Masons have adopted the same idea.

 

They teach that death is but the beginning of life; that if the first or evanescent temples of our transitory life be on the surface, we must descend into the Secret Vault of death before we can find that sacred deposit of truth which is to adorn our second temple of eternal life.

 

It is in this sense an entrance through the grave into eternal life, that we are to view the symbolism of the Secret Vault.

 

Like every other myth and allegory of Masonry, the historical relation may be true, or it may be false; it may be founded on fact, or be the invention of imagination, the lesson is still there, and the symbolism teaches it, exclusive of the history."

 

The above quotations; have been made because the present writer had devoted many years to the study of the topography of Jerusalem and its immediate vicinity in connection with his studies in the various Masonic rites which locate their mysteries in that city and in and about the Temple area now called Harem-esh Sheriff. His conclusions are that not a single degree in Masonry can properly be located near the city of Jerusalem nor on or in the "Sacred Area" of the Temple.

 

So far as the caves or cisterns which are to be found under the surface of the "Area" at the present day did give a key to those who formulated the Cryptic degrees, he feels assured that the originators of those degrees did have some knowledge of their existence - but with accurate maps of that "Area" and the location of every vault or cistern before us, furnished by the accurate survey of Captain Chas. Warren in 1867, we could not for one moment entertain the belief that such a system of vaults or arches ever existed there, as described in our lectures of any of the Rituals - but we do believe that these rituals, being symbolic and allegorical, were founded upon the fact of vaults found in that locality.

 

We can refer to the legend of Enoch and his vaults, erected to conceal the sacred delta, constructed by him and his son Methuselah, after the ineffable NAME of Deity had been revealed to him, and which name he had engraved upon the delta, which by the command of God, he was to conceal and secure, for future generations to discover.

 

These vaults, nine of them, were securely constructed, and two pillars were erected, and placed near, with inscriptions to indicate the locality of the vaults.

 

It is possible that the pillars were destroyed and carried away by the flood.

 

The fable further states that when King Solomon commenced the preparation of the ground on Mount Moriah for the temple, his workmen broke into these vaults and found certain mysterious things there; and upon reporting to King Solomon what they had found, he directed them to cease their labors, as he supposed the vault had been a secret place for the worship of the gods of the original inhabitants of Canaan.

 

God, however, notified him in a dream that he should proceed; as he had designed that spot for the erection of the Temple for his worship, as it had been thrice dedicated, first by Enoch when he constructed the vaults and made the deposits of these mysterious emblems - second, on this spot Abraham erected the altar to sacrifice his son Isaac (1) - and third, by his father David, where he erected the altar on the threshing floor of Arauna and sacrificed to stay the hand of the destroying Angel. (2)

 

There is no doubt whatever in the mind of the writer but that the inventors of the degrees above the three original degrees - such as the Royal Arch and Select, designed to demonstrate to the postulant the value of the great and now ineffable and mysterious name of Deity.

 

It is well known to all students of the ancient mysteries of the Orient that after the initiation of a candidate in the lower mysteries, and a certain period having elapsed, by many severe tests, lustrations by the four elements and trials, he was invested with the great WORD in a very solemn and mysterious manner, by the Archi-Magus, who alone could communicate this word to the postulant.

 

In receiving this word, was conveyed to him by its interpretation, the meaning of all the preceding ceremonies.

 

Those who arranged the series of degrees as above mentioned, from the Entered Apprentice to the Select Master, designed that in the last degree there should be a full explanation of all that which was concealed in the various forms and ceremonies, and in our present lectures in that degree it is very evident that such was the design

 

(1) Gen., ch. xxii.

 

(2) 1. Chron., ch. xxi., verses 25 to 27.

 

 

 

sign of closing the Ancient Craft Masonry with the Select of Twenty-seven, "to pass the Circle of Ancient Craft Masonry."

 

GENERAL GRAND COUNCIL.

 

In 187I the Grand Council of Massachuseas undertook the task of bringing mder out of the disordered condition of the Cryptic Rite in the United States, and having enlisted the valuable services of our most distinguished Companion, Hon. Josiah H. Drummond, of Maine, (1) who, in compliance with their request, called a convention, and fourteen Grand Councils were represented at the meeting in New York City, June 12, 1872, at which the following was adopted:

 

"Whereas, In some jurisdictions the question has been mooted of surrendering the Cryptic Degrees to the Chapters; and

 

"Whereas, There are many Companions who have received the degrees in Chapters or from Sovereign Inspectors of A.'.A.'.S.'. Rite, therefore

 

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this Convention that the Cryptic degrees should be under the exclusive jurisdiction of Grand Councils, and that no one should be recognized as a regular Companion of the Rite who had not received the degrees in a lawfully constituted Council or by authority of the Supreme Council of the A.'.A.'.S.'. Rite previous to the date, or has been lawfully healed."

 

The convention adopted a uniform system of nomenclature, which has since been generally adopted.

 

In June, 1873, another meeting of the Convention was held in New York and nineteen Grand Councils were represented.

 

The following was adopted:

 

"That the order of the succession of the degrees be: First, Royal Master's; second, Select Master's; and that it be left optional with each Grand Council to confer the super-excellent Master's degree as an honorary degree."

 

The convention announced as its opinion that a General Grand Council of the United States should be formed. Subsequently meetings were held, December, 1874, in New Orleans; August, 1877, in Buffalo, N.Y.; at which latter meeting twenty-two Grand Councils were represented, and also Ontario, Canada.

 

The convention

 

(1) Drummond, "History of Grard Council in United States," p. 89, in the Cryptic Rite

 

met at Detroit, August 23, 1880, when a constitution was adopted which it was required should be adopted by not less than nine regular Grand Councils, and then should become operative.

 

The General Grand Recorder, George W. Cooley, gave notice, February 23, 1881, that the Grand Councils of New York, Minnesota, Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Alabama, and Louisiana had ratified the constitution.

 

On March 1, 1881, Hon. Josiah H. Drummond, General Grand Master, issued his circular to the officers, and also announced that the Grand Council of South Carolina had adopted the constitution. (1) The first sesion was held pursuant to this circular, at Denver, Col., August 14, 1883, and the following Grand Councils were represented: California, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Vermont. (Forever blessed be their memory.) Of those seventeen who originally acceded to the first formation of the provisional General Grand Council, in 1880, these were absent: Georgia and Alabama; and South Carolina had since given her adhesion.

 

Alabama, having been with the seventeen Grand Councils to join in the formation of the provisional General Grand Council in 1880, was never represented at any subsequent assembly.

 

We will now, in a more regular manner, give the history of the formation of the General Grand Council.

 

The General Grand Council of the United States was organized at a convention of delegates of seventeen Grand Councils which met at Detroit, Mich., August 23, 1880.

 

The action of this convention was at once approved by the following Grand Councils: New York, Minnesota, Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Alabama, and Louisiana.

 

South Carolina Grand Council soon thereafter organized, and ratified the constitution of the General Grand Council and resumed work.

 

In the address of the General Grand Master, Josiah H. Drummond, at the first Triennial Assembly, held at Denver, Col., August 14, 1883, he states: "At the time of the formation of the provisional General Grand Council there were twenty-three Grand Councils, which had not adopted the 'Mississippi Plan.'

 

(1) Proceedings, 1883, p. 20.

 

 

 

"Of these, seventeen, viz., Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, and Vermont, have become constituents of the General Grand Council. (1)

 

Of the other six, five continue to exist, but have not become constituents of this body, viz., Connecticut, Michigan, New jersey, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

 

Some of these, however, have the matter under consideration.

 

It is understood why Connecticut has not given her adhesion is, the law of this body, that persons receiving the degrees in Chapters, or in Councils appurtenant to Chapters, can not be recognized.

 

"The remaining one of twenty-three, North Carolina, at its session held in June last undertook to dissolve and turn the degrees over to the Chapter.

 

While this occasions regret, it is no matter of surprise, because Royal Arch Masonry is at an exceedingly low ebb in that State, and it sometimes seems a matter of doubt whether the Grand Chapter itself will be able to maintain its existence.

 

"Grand Councils at the advent of the 'Mississippi Plan' existed in other States, as follows: Arkansas, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, South Carolina, and Wisconsin.

 

All of which accepted in some form the general features of the 'Mississippi Plan.'

 

"The Grand Councils of Arkansas, Illinois, and Kentucky have reorganized, but have not as yet ratified and adopted the General Grand Constitution.

 

The Grand Council of Illinois never formally dissolved, but maintained its existence and undertook to surrender the degrees to the Grand Chapter; this action had been rescinded by both grand bodies, and the Grand Council now exists with all its powers, and I trust with its pristine vigor." (2)

 

We have followed thus far the history of the Cryptic Rite as given by Companion Josiah H. Drummond in his address to the General Grand Council at the first Triennial Assembly, three years after the inauguration of that body.

 

He further stated the following Grand Councils had taken no definite action, viz., Iowa and Nebraska.

 

Mississippi had taken action in reference to the over-whelming sentiment of the Craft, which looks toward reorganizing the Grand Council System.

 

The situation in Wisconsin is anomalous; the Grand Council surrendered the degrees to the Grand Chapter,

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Council, 1883, p. 7.

 

(2) Ibid., General Grand Master's Address.

 

 

 

which authorized the conferring of them in a council appurtenant to a chapter, (1) so that in theory, if not in practice, each chapter had a council appurtenant to it, the chapter officers being the officers of the council.

 

But in 1881, in consequence, as I understand, of objections to the recognition of persons receiving the degrees in such councils, a convention of the delegates of these councils was called, and a Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters was organized. (2)

 

We have given the above very interesting information as to the several States wherein the Cryptic Rite was worked in this place rather than in the separate individual jurisdictions, as it greatly saves space and time, reserving both of these for the details property belonging to each subordinate jurisdiction as to the organization of the constituent councils in each, as it will appear under the alphabetical arrangement.

 

Note. - Companion Drummond in the above sketch begins with Alabama, but that Grand Council never appears in any subsequent proceedings as a constituent of the General Council.

 

Alabama.

 

The information which we have been enabled to obtain concerning Cryptic Masonry in Alabama is somewhat vague.

 

It is supposed that John Barker, of the A.'.A.'.S.'. R.'. Southern Jurisdiction, started the first councils of Royal and Select Masters, under his authority as Deputy Inspector-General.

 

It is conceded that a Grand Council was organized in 1838 (December 13th).

 

(3) This Grand Council repudiated, very properly, the course of the Grand Chapter of Virginia, in capturing the degrees of the council, and incorporating them with the chapter work, in 1843.

 

The council also, in 1849, protested against the Grand Consistory of Charleston granting (of) these degrees in its jurisdiction. (4)

 

This Grand Council met, with some omissions, as in 1840, 1861, 1862 or 1863, until in 1886 it was dissolved, when all branches of Masonry in that State were much depressed. Since then, however, matters have greatly improved.

 

This Grand Council was never connected with the General Grand Council after 1881, although one of the first to join in the organization in 1880.

 

(1) Charters issued to chapters in 1848-49 provided for this usage.-EDITOR.

 

(2) Ibid.

 

(3) "History of Masonry and Concordant Orders," p. 661. (4) Ibid.

 

 

 

Arizona.

 

The proceedings of the Triennial assembly of the General Grand council of 1897 show that the following councils secured their warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation Granted.

 

Chartered

 

Olive Council, No.1. At Prescott, July 1, 1893. August 22, Phoenix, U.D.

 

 

 

At Phoenix, April 4, 1895. Surrendered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 17, 1897 Tucson, U.D.

 

 

 

At Tucson, April 5, 1895.

 

Surrendered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2, 1897

 

Arkansas.

 

Four subordinate councils were, at an early date, chartered by the Supreme Council A.'. A.'. S.'. R.'. of the Southern Jurisdiction.

 

These four councils were formed by the State Grand Council, November 6, 1860.

 

In 1878 the Companions adopted the system of incorporation with the chapters; but in 1881 resumed the independent form; and in 1886 united with the General Grand Council, and is yet within that organization.

 

On the 25th of April, 1899, they had the sad misfortune to lose their Grand Recorder Companion James A. Henry.

 

California.

 

 

 

The Grand Council of Alabama granted charters to organize two councils in California.

 

One council was chartered by the Grand Council of Tennessee, and one by the Grand Council of Texas. These four councils organized a Grand Council, June 26, 1860. In 1880 this Grand Council united with the General Grand Council in its organization.

 

Colorado.

 

The following councils were organized in Colorado under the General Grand Council :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation Granted.

 

Chartered.

 

Denver, No. 1........Denver, January 16, 1892. August 21, 1894.

 

Rocky Mountain, No. 2 Trinidad, March 24, 1893 August 21, 1894.

 

Durango, No. 3........Durango, May 16, 1893.

 

August 21, 1894.

 

Akron, No. 4..........Akron, May 23, 1893.

 

August 21, 1894.

 

Canon City, No. 5.....Canon City, June 5, 1893 August 21, 1894.

 

Gunnison, U.D.........Gunnison.

 

Pueblo, No. 7.........Pueblo, April 10, 1894

 

August 21, 1894.

 

 

 

All of these councils are reported as being in existence at the Triennial held in 1897. At that session the General Grand Master reported that he had issued dispensations as follows :

 

To Hiram Council, at Greely, with sixteen members, December 8, 1894; but no interest being taken, the dispensation was surrendered, December 9, 1896.

 

To Zabud Council, at Colorado Springs, with thirty-two members, May 27, 1895.

 

This council made reports for 1895, 1896, and 1897; paid dues for 1895 only, and asked for a Charter; but does not appear in the list of councils whose dispensations were continued; nor was it chartered.

 

To Leadville Council, at Leadville, June 10, 1895, and dispensation was surrendered, November 10, 1896.

 

Hiram, U. D., Greely, December 8, 1894, and surrendered.

 

Zabud, U. D., Colorado Springs, May 27, 1895, and continued.

 

Leadville, U. D., Leadville, June 10, 1895, surrendered.

 

Connecticut.

 

In 1818 Companion Jeremy L. Cross was very industrious in propagating the Cryptic Rite, and succeeded in forming ten councils in Connecticut.

 

The first Grand Council of Select Masters for the State was organized by that name as claimed.

 

There are no records of this body up to 1830. In 1825 the two degrees of Royal and Select Masons were recognized.

 

From 1826 to 1846, in consequence of the Morgan episode, very little if anything was done in this as well as other branches of Masonry.

 

Since the revival, in all the States where the anti-Masonic spirit had prevailed, Masonry has taken a "new and prolonged lease," and flourishes to a much greater degree than ever before in its history.

 

The sons and grandsons of the bitterest anti-Masons of 1830 are now the most zealous in their efforts to spread abroad the glad tidings of peace on earth and good-will toward men."

 

Connecticut Grand Council does not belong to the General Grand Council, which is much to be regretted.

 

The benefits of her union with that body would be mutual.

 

Delaware.

 

It is said that Jeremy L. Cross, when on his lecturing tour in the early days, visited Delaware and conferred the degrees in Wilmington and Newcastle. We have no funher information from that State.

 

District of Columbia.

 

The Cryptic degrees are first mentioned, in the history of Masonic degrees in the District of Columbia, in the records of the Grand Chapter which was organized in 1822.

 

At the Semi-Annual Convocation held June 9, 1829, the report of the Committee on Correspondence refers to a circular letter which had been sent by the Grand Chapter of Maryland to each Grand Chapter in the United States; which is as follows: (1)

 

"M.E. Sir and Companion:

 

"I am instructed by the Grand Chapter over which I have the honor to preside, to address you, and through you your Grand Chapter, upon the unsettled state of the degree of Select Mason, a subject deemed by us of sufficient importance to claim the particular attention of your Grand Chapter.

 

"This degree existed under the authority of a distinguished Chief in the State of Maryland, but without the recognizance of our Grand Chapter for many years; until, in the year 1824, upon the revision of our Constitution, it appearing, evident that the Select Degree not only has an intimate connection with, but is in a measure necessary, as preparatory to and elucidatory of that of the Royal Arch; it was formally recognized by our Grand Chapter, and required to be given by our subordinate Chapters in its proper order immediately preceding that of the Royal Arch.

 

Under this arrangement we have since progressed, much to our satisfaction; but it is with regret that we have learned that Councils or Chapters of Select Masons have been established in some of our sister States, independent of Royal Arch Masonry, avowedly in pursuance of, but, as we are satisfied, through a great mistake or actual abuse of any authority delegated, or meant to be delegated, in relation to the Select Degree.

 

We would, therefore, beg leave respectfully to

 

(1) Proceedings of Grand Chapter of District of Columbia, 1822-1833, p.

 

108.

 

 

 

recommend to your Grand Chapter the consideration of this degree, and the circumstances under which it exists, within your jurisdiction; with the hope that you will see it to be for the general interest of the Craft to take the degree under your recognizance and control, to whom of right it belongs, and thereby do away with what is felt to be a grievance, by those distinguished Chiefs, whose authority, delegated to a limited extent, and for special reasons, has been perveaed for sordid purposes, by the creation of an independent order, never contemplated by them; and which we believe to be inconsistent with the spirit and best interests of our institution.

 

"Respectfully and fraternally, &c."

 

This was never officially communicated to the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia by the Grand Chapter of Maryland, but was taken from the printed proceedings of that body, pp. 15, 16, and 17.

 

That committee also reported: "The Grand Chapter of North Carolina had determined that the degree should come under the jurisdiction of State Grand Chapters, and recommended it to the favorable consideration of the General Grand Chapter.

 

The Grand Chapter of Maine had referred the subject to a Committee.

 

It remains for the Grand Chapter to take such orders in the premises as it shall seem proper."

 

The Grand Chapter of Ohio has passed a resolution of which the following is a copy, and which has officially been communicated to this Grand Chapter for its consideration. "At a regular communication of the Grand Chapter [of Ohio] in January, 1829, the following resolution was adopted:

 

"Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Grand Chapter that the General Grand Chapter of the United States ought to be dissolved.

 

"BELA LATHAM, "Grand Secretary."

 

A committee to whom the subject was referred reported: (2)

 

"That they are decidedly of the opinion that the Royal and Select Master's Degrees should be recognized by and conferred under the direction of the several Grand Chapters of the respective States and Territories of the Union.

 

With regard to the proper time when

 

(1) Proceedings of Grand Chapter of District of Columbia, p. 109.

 

(2) Ibid., 113.

 

 

 

these degrees should be conferred, whether before or after the Royal Arch Degree, they decline expressing an opinion, preferring that this point should bc left to the determination of the General Grand Chapter; and they recommend that the representatives from this Grand Chapter to that body, at its Triennial meeting, in September, be instructed to conform in their proceedings on this subject, to the tenor of the foregoing." This was laid on the table for the present.

 

When taken up again, it was "Resolved, That the further consideration thereof be postponed till the first Tuesday in August next; and that in the meantime the Grand Secretary be directed to forward a copy of the report this day made on that subject to the several Councils of Royal and Select Masters in the District of Columbia." (1)

 

At the special convocation, held August 31, 1829, the following appears: Companion Baldwin, from a committee appointed by the Council of Royal and Select Masters of the City of Washington (which body had been addressed on the subject by the Grand Secretary, pursuant to order) presented to the Grand Chapter the following letter and report, viz. : (2)

 

"WASHINGTON, August 31, 1829.

 

At a special meeting of the Council of Royal and Select Masters, held at the Central Masonic Hall, on Saturday, the 29th of August, instant, the written report having been presented and read, was, on motion, ordered to be transmitted to the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia at their next meeting.

 

"JOHN CAROTHERS, T.I.G.M.

 

W.W. BiLLINGS, Recorder."

 

Report.

 

"The Committee appointed by the Council of Royal and Select Masters of the City of Washington, to whom was referred the propriety of extending the jurisdiction of the General, Grand, and Subordinate Royal Arch Chapters so as to embrace the Degrees of Royal and Select Masters, have the honor to report :

 

"That they have had the subject under consideration, and are duly impressed with its vast importance.

 

After the most mature deliberation they have corne to the following conclusions: That Masonic light in its principles, and the order of its development, is fixed and unchangeable ! That whatever power the Fraternity may

 

(1) Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia, p. 115.

 

(2) Ibid., 119.

 

 

 

have over forms and ceremonies, yet no body of Masons, however exalted, neither have nor can assume the power of changing the original landmarks, or altering its clements.

 

Your committee are confident, from an intimate acquaintance with all the degrees, that those of 'Royal and Select Master' are not only posterior in order to the 'Royal Arch,' but that in our opinion it would not be consistent with ancient Masonry to make them previous.

 

"Whether the interests of the Craft would be promoted by this extended jurisdiction, your Committee are unable to say; but should that course be thought advisable, by the General Grand Chapter, in its solemn deliberation, your Committee are decidedly of the opinion that it can only be done under the following restrictions:

 

"1st. That the Degrees of Royal and Select Masters can only be conferred on Royal Arch Masons.

 

"2d.

 

No one can be an officer of any Chapter who is not both a Royal and Select Master.

 

"Without these restrictions your Committee can never consent to a change in the present established mode of proceeding. (1)

 

"All of which is most respectfully submitted.

 

"E. BALDWIN, "W.W. BILLINGS,

 

Committee." "J.A. KENNEDY,

 

The report of a committee made in June last on the subject of the degree was taken up and read, and was passed by a majority of one vote only, and on motion it was

 

"Resolved, That the Grand Secretary transmit to the General Grand Secretary copies of the two reports above stated, together with the proper credentials of the proxies appointed to represent this Grand Chapter in the General Grand Chapter of the United States, at its ensuing meeting in New York; and that the Grand Secretary do prepare the proper instructions."

 

At the meeting of the General Grand Chapter, September 11, 1829, the question came up for action on a communication from Comp. J.K. Stapleton, upon which a suitable committee made the following report, and it and the resolutions were adopted:

 

"Whereas, It is satisfactorily proved to this General Grand Chapter, that the Constitution of the Councils of Royal and Select

 

(1) Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of District of Columbia, p. 120.

 

 

 

Master Mason, in different parts of the United States, by sundry persons, has been without any legitimate authority,

 

"And Whereas, Those degrees are conferred in some chapters, under the authority of the General Grand Chapter; and whereas it was proved that it was the only and sole intention of the Most Excellent Companions from whom these degrees emanated that they should be conferred under the authority of Royal Arch Chapters; therefore,

 

"Resolved, That this General Grand Chapter cordially recommend to the different Councils in the United States to adopt measures to place those degrees under the authority of the State Grand Chapters.

 

"Resolved, That authority be, and is hereby, granted to the several Grand Chapters, under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Chapter, to make such arrangements as shall be found necessary for conferring the degrees of Royal and Select Masters in Royal Arch Chapters; provided always that no Grand Chapter, within the limits of which is a Grand Council, shall authorize the Royal Arch Chapters under the jurisdiction to confer such degrees without the consent of such Grand Council."

 

We have no records or accounts whatever in the District of Columbia as to what became of the "Council," or Councils, if more than one, which is referred to above.

 

The chapters in the District continued to confer the Royal and Select degrees prior to the Royal Arch, until in 1833, when the Grand Chapter was dissolved. Several of the chapters again joined the Grand Chapter of Maryland,

 

which body, thereafter, in 1844, added to its nomenclature "the District of Columbia," and the Council degrees were worked within the chapters prior to the Royal Arch, until May 23, 1867, when the Grand Chapter of the District of Columbia was again organized; and on that day, the new Grand Chapter, by resolution, unanimously dropped those degrees from the curriculum of the chapter work, being well satisfied that they did not properly belong to the chapters. Soon after the organization of the Grand Chapter in 1867, Companion Benjamin B. French, the Inspector-General of the Southern Jurisdiction for the A.'.A.'.S.'.R.'., for the District of Columbia, issued three dispensations to form three new councils of Royal and Select Masters, for the District of Columbia.

 

Those who had recoved those degrees in regular organized councils refused to join in this movement.

 

Soon after this, the question was agitated as to the legality and propriety of thus inaugurating a new method of propagating the Cryptic degrees, and the result was, these three councils went into "innocuous desuetude." When the time was deemed judicious, the present writer, with eight others, who had been regular Council Masons, prepared a petition to the Grand Council of Massachusetts for a dispensation to open LaFayette Council.

 

This was granted August, 1870, with the writer as Most Illustrious Master.

 

The Grand Officers of the Grand Council of that State came to Washington and opened LaFayette Council.

 

Inasmuch as the great body of Royal and Select Masons in the District had received the degrees of Royal and Select Masters in their several chapters prior to the Royal Arch, it was decided that all such Royal Arch Masons, as well as those who had never received the Council degrees, should be received at a nominal price (five dollars) for those degrees.

 

Accordingly, in two nights sessions the Grand Officers conferred the Royal, Select, and Super-excellent degrees upon 158 R.A. Masons.

 

A Charter was granted December 14, 1870, and the council started with flying colors and great success.

 

This council continued with some measure of prosperity for several years, when from internal dissensions the members lost their interest and in a few years ceased to attend, and the council died out.

 

When the General Grand Council of the United States was organized in 1881, the present writer, after correspondence with Companion Josiah H. Drummond, the General Grand Master, and a few members of the defunct body, petitioned for another council to be called "Washington," with the principal officers of the deceased LaFayette Council at the head. A dispensation was granted, and started with good prospects.

 

At the next meeting of the General Grand Council a Charter was granted.

 

Since that time Washington Council, No. 1, has continued to grow, but not as rapidly as she should.

 

Indeed, the District of Columbia should have several councils in prosperous operation, and that, too, under the constitution of a Grand Council for the District.

 

Florida.

 

The Southern Supreme Council, exercising its undoubted right of control at that time over the degrees of Royal and Select Masons, through some one of her inspectors, perhaps in South Carolina, had, previous to 1858, issued at different times warrants to form three councils in Florida.

 

The present writer is personally aware of the one existing at Warrington, adjoining the navy-yard at that locality, as he reported for duty as Chief Constructing Engineer at that naval station February, 1857, and found a thriving lodge, chapter, and council in full operation, and it was his great pleasure to assist in the work in all of these bodies at that time.

 

January 13, 1858, these three councils organized a Grand Council, at the time of the agitation of who should control these degrees.

 

After much discussion the Grand Chapter of Florida declined to act.

 

The Grand Council became a member of the General Grand Body.

 

There have been no proceedings of the body issued since 1882, and there have been no meetings since 1884. In the proceedings of the General Grand Council for 1897 there is a broad black mark across the page opposite to Florida, where the Grand Recorder's name should have been, but in the tables of annual assemblies from 1894 to 1896 Florida appears with names of the Grand Officers.

 

Georgia.

 

We learn that one of the deputies of the Southern Supreme Council, Abram Jacobs, conferred the degree of Select of Twenty-seven in the State of Georgia.

 

On May 2, 1826, a Grand Council was organized by the authority of the Inspector-General of the Supreme Council, which is noticed in the publications of that day.

 

June 25, 1841, three councils met, and a Grand Council was established by the authority of the Supreme Grand Council of the 33 degree, in Charleston, S.C. They adopted the constitution of the former Grand Council of 1826. That body, having ceased to work, became dormant and the records were lost.

 

In the revised constitution of 1842 they claimed to be the highest source of legitimate Masonic authority in the State of Georgia, and of right ought to have the government and superintendence of all councils of Royal and Select Masters within its jurisdiction. (1) This Grand Council belongs to the General Grand Council and is reported in the proceedings of 1897.

 

Idaho

 

A council was organized in Idaho by a dispensation from the Officers of the General Grand Council, viz., Idaho Council, No. 1, at Pocatillo, December 15, 1896 - which was annulled afterward; also a dispensation for Adoniram Council, at Boise, January 30, 1896. Dispensation continued until next assembly.

 

Illinois

 

The Grand Council of Kentucky having issued charters to several councils in the State of Illinois, a Grand Council was organized March 10, 1854. In 1877 the degrees wcre surrendered to the control of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, notwithstanding that in 1854 it refused to heal Royal and Select Masters who had been made in the chapters.

 

The Grand Council, however, continued its annual sessions, its constituents being composed of the mixture of regularly made Council Masters and those made in the chapters.

 

This did not prove satisfactory, and in 1882 the Grand Council and Grand Chapter agreed to resume their old condition. Illinois Grand Council is an independent Grand Body.

 

Indiana.

 

In the State of Indiana the Council degrees were given in the chapter work.

 

After the General Grand Chapter's decision, councils were chartered by the Grand Councils of Kentucky and Ohio.

 

Chapter Royal and Select Masons were "healed" and the Grand Council of Indiana was organized December 20, 1855.

 

Iowa.

 

When Royal Arch Masonry was first planted in Iowa, the Council degrees were part of the chapter work.

 

After the decision of the General Grand Chapter, in regard to these degrees, Companions were "healed" by the authority of the Grand Master of the

 

(1) "History of Masonry and Concordant Orders," p. 662.

 

 

 

Grand Council of Illinois.

 

Charters were issued by that Grand Council to councils in Iowa, which subsequently organized the Grand Council of Iowa, January 2, 1857. In 1878 the Grand Council merged itself into the Grand Chapter of Iowa, nineteen councils having been duly organized prior to that time.

 

To the present day those degrees are merged into the chapter of Royal Arch.

 

Kansas.

 

Three councils of Royal and Select Masters were chartered by the Grand Council of Missouri, in the State of Kansas, and December 2, 1867, these three councils organized a Grand Council of Royal Select and Super-excellent Masons.

 

Kentucky.

 

The Select degree was carried into the State of Kentucky by J.L. Cross, when in 1817 he made his official tour through the Western States as General Grand Lecturer of the General Grand Chapter.

 

December 10, 1827, six councils met by their delegates and organized a Grand Council of the State, which is said to be the result of John Barker's efforts in behalf of the Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction, A.'. A.'. S.'. R.'. This jurisdiction felt the effects of the Morgan anti-Masonic period from 1830 to 1840, when the Grand Council met only once.

 

The degrees were merged into the chapter from 1878 to 1881.

 

After the organization of the General Grand Council the Grand Council of Kentucky was re-organized.

 

Companion H.B. Grant, M.'. III.'. Gr.'. Master, in his annals mentions the case of a Thrice Illustrious Master of a council who communicated the degrees outside of a council, and who construed his obligation to mean that he could not confer the degrees except in a council, but could communicate the degrees, and so directed the record to be made as if conferred in a council.

 

This was declared by the Grand Master to be irregular, and required recognition to be refused until they were "healed" in open council.

 

The Grand Council of Kentucky is an independent body.

 

Louisiana.

 

It is stated that John Barker in 1827 organized Holland Council, No. 1, in New Orleans, and in the "tableau" of the Grand Chapter of Louisiana in 1828 it is referred to.

 

When in or about 1850 Capitular Masonry was re-organized, Cryptic Masonry was also revived.

 

Four councils formed a Grand Council February 10, 1856.

 

One of these was Holland, No. 1. The others had been chartered by the Grand Councils of Kentucky and Alabama.

 

Maine

 

At an early period a council had been organized in Maine, working under the General Grand Chapter.

 

The Grand Council of Massachusetts organized three councils, and these, by their delegates, formed the Grand Council, May 3, 1855.

 

Maryland

 

In the introduction of this history of the Cryptic Rite, the connection of Eckel and Niles, as leaders at an early date, was noticed. (1) The Select degree was then only recognized as an appendant to the regular curriculum of degrees of the A.'. A.'. S.'. R.'. which was controlled by the Deputy Inspectors of that rite.

 

This was prior to 1800, and perhaps extended into the present century, as late as the date of the certificate, or dispensation, given to Cross.

 

We have seen, under District of Columbia, the steps which were taken, as eady as 1824 to incorporate these degrees with the chapter work and to precede the Most Excellent Master's degree.

 

This union of the Cryptic with the Capitular system continued until 1872, when, by law, the Grand Chapter separated them.

 

Six council after this (May 12, 1874) organized the present Grand Council of the State, which became a member of the General Grand Council and so continues.

 

Massachusetts.

 

In 1817 a voluntary council of Royal Masters was organized by Benjamin Gleason and others, and subsequently obtained the sanction of Columbian Council of New York.

 

A Select council was formed at Springfield, May 28, 1818, by J.L. Cross.

 

Six councils, at different times, having been organized, their delegates met February 8, 1826, and on June 15, 1826, completed the formation of a Grand Council.

 

The records of this body having been lost during

 

(1) See pp. 1549, 1550.


 

 

A\ A\ SCOTTISH RITE

 

 

the anti-Masonic period, nothing is known concerning these degrees until the re-organization in 1847.

 

From the year 1853 the Grand Council has met regularly and great prosperity has followed.

 

It is asserted that Hiram Council, at Worcester, with 1,070 members in 1897, is the largest council of Royal and Select Masters in the world.

 

Michigan

 

The Grand Council of Connecticut had chartered three councils in the State of Michigan, and these, by their delegates, met in convention on January 13, 1858, and organized a Grand Council for the State.

 

In 1856 that Grand Council granted a Charter for a council at Detroit.

 

This Grand Council is independent, and chapter - made Royal and Select Masons are not in favor.

 

Minnesota

 

The Grand Council of Iowa having chartered three councils in Minnesota, December 12, 1870, these three by their delegates organized a Grand Council.

 

The council which had been chartered by the Grand Council of New York in 1855 soon became dormant.

 

This Grand Council is a member of the General Grand Council.

 

Mississippi

 

From our careful exarnination into the early history of Cryptic Masonry in the State of Mississippi, we find that John Barker, before mentioned as agent for the Southern Supreme Council, established at Natchez, Miss., a Grand Council of Princes of Jerusalem in 1829, which assumed the control of the Royal and Select Master's degrees, and under the auspices of the Council of Princes of Jerusalem seven councils were organized, and these by their delegates organized a Grand Council January 19, 1856.

 

After the close of the war, in 1865, a number of the councils having surrendered their charters, and others having become dormant, the Grand Council, which had assemtacd annually, in 1877 adopted a plan which became widely known as the "Mississippi Plan," which provided:

 

"Each Royal Arch Chapter shall hereafter open within its bosom, under its charter, as a Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, a Council of Royal and Select Masters; the officers of the Chapter corresponding in rank to those of the Council.

 

"All the Royal Arch Masons who have not received the degrees of Royal Master and Select Master shall be entitled to have the same conferred or communicated on their request and without charge; but candidates who shall hereafter receive the Royal Arch degree shall immediately thereafter, and in connection with the Royal Arch degree, receive the degrees of Royal and Select Master without additional charge."

 

The Grand Council was dissolved, and this plan was adopted in many jurisdictions, the General Grand Chapter having placed on record at Lexington, Ky., at the meeting September 16, 1853, the following resolution :

 

"Resolved, That this General Grand Chapter and the governing bodies of Royal Arch Masonry affiliated with, and holding jurisdiction under it, have no rightful jurisdiction or control over the degrees of Royal and Select Master."

 

"Resolved, That this General Grand Chapter will hereafter entertain no question or matter growing out of the government or working of these degrees while in their present position." (1)

 

All of the independent jurisdiction except Iowa, which adopted the Mississippi Plan," have rescinded the same and returned to the council organization.

 

In 1888 the Grand Council of Mississippi at its session that year adopted the following :

 

"Resolved, That the Grand Royal Arch Chapter hereby releases control of the Cryptic Degrees and recommends that the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters resume its former jurisdiction of the degrees.

 

"That Chapters are hereby prohibited from communicating and conferring the Cryptic Degrees, recognizing the authority of the Grand Council in all matters pertaining to said degrees." In February, 1888, the Grand Council of Mississippi met, six of the officers being of those elected in 1877. Six councils were represented.

 

At the sixth triennial assembly of the General Grand Chapter, which met in Baltimore, Md., October 11, 1897, the following paper was unanimously adopted :

 

"Whereas, The report of Companion Josiah H. Drummond as

 

(1) Proceedings of the General Grand Chapter, 1856, p. 317.

 

 

 

chairman of the Committee on Correspondence of the Grand Council of Maine for the year 1894, and the Address of Companion Frederic Speed, Grand Master of the Grand Council of Mississippi for the year 1895, present facts that conclusively show that a misunderstanding has existed in the minds of our Companions in Mississippi for some years past, as to the attitude of General Grand Council towards the Grand Council of Mississippi; therefore be it

 

"Resolved, That the General Grand Council, through its Grand Master, extend to the Companions of the Grand Council of Mississippi its fraternal greetings and its best wishes for the prosperity of the Cryptic Rite in Mississippi." (1)

 

Also this minute appeared: "Most Illustrious Frederic Speed, Grand Master of the Grand Council of Mississippi, was announced and received with the Grand Honors, escorted to the East, and greeted by the Most Puissant Grand Master in a happy and felicitous manner.

 

"Companion Speed thereupon addressed the General Grand Council in very eloquent language; thanking the Puissant Grand Master for the cordiality of his reception, etc.

 

The above preamble and resolution was then read and Companion Speed spoke feelingly as follows:

 

"'Most Illustrious Sir and Companions:

 

"'When I say that the reading of the resolution, which I have just heard, affords me the most sincere satisfaction and pleasure, I but feebly voice the emotions of my heart.

 

If I know myself or the great-hearted men who comprise the Cryptic Masons of Mississippi, I can honestly say that we have taken no pleasure in the long estrangement which has unfortunately divided us, and I am sure they will receive with no less happiness than I now do, the message of peace and good will which come to us, through the action of this most illustrious Body.

 

Receive then, Sir, this right hand as a pledge, in their name, of reconciliation and peace, given with a determination to forget the past, and to strive in the bonds of friendship and brotherly love, with you, for the upbuilding of the temple of the Lord, letting the past bury its dead, and acting in the living present, heart within and God overhead.

 

Whom God hath joined together, let no man put asunder." (2)

 

(1) Proceedings General Grand Council, 1897, p. 79.

 

(2) Ibid., p. 82.

 

 

 

Missouri,

 

It is said by very good authority that Cross, in his tour through the West, conferred the Select degree in Missouri; in what year is uncertain.

 

Also it is said that the Royal degree was introduced as early as 1828.

 

In 1841 there were three councils in the State: one in St. Louis, one at Palmyra, and where the other was located the present writer can not recollect. At that time, 1841-42, he was in St. Louis and received the Royal and Select degrees in Missouri Council, No. 1, at St. Louis, about the time the Grand Council met.

 

Immediately after the Grand Council closed he wrote up and recorded the transactions of the Grand Council.

 

These bodies became extinct, as well as some councils which had been chartered by the Grand Council of Kentucky.

 

May 21, 1864, the Grand Council was organized.

 

In 1848 the writer having gone to Independence to construct a local railroad, found the Council degrees incorporated in the chapter by the Charter, to be worked subsequent to the Royal Arch.

 

Montana.

 

The following councils in Montana received dispensations from the General Grand Council, viz.:

 

Glendive, at Glendive...........April 22, 1896.

 

Dispensation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 12, 1897.

 

Chartered.

 

Custer, at Miles City...........October 24, 1897. Dispensation,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Adoniram, at Livingston.........May 13, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Mystic at Bozeman...............May 20, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Zabud, No. 2, at Butte..........May 22, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 12, 1897.

 

Montana, at Dillon..............October 24, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Deer Lodge, at Deer Lodge.......June 10, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Anaconda, at Anaconda...........June 11, 1897.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Hellgate, at Missoula...........September 1, 1897

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Hiram, at Kalispell.............September 2, 1897,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

These councils were all reported at the triennial of the Supreme Council in 1897.

 

Nevada.

 

The following councils were organized by dispensations issued by the Grand Officers of the General Grand Council for Nevada.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation.

 

Carson, at Carson................September 3, 1896.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Mountain, at Virginia City.......September 4, 1896.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Reno, at Reno....................September, 1896.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Eureka, at Eureka................September 21, 1896.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

 

 

These were reported to the triennial of the General Grand Council in 1897.

 

New Mexico

 

The following, councils were granted dispensations, by the Officers of the General Grand Council, for New Mexico, viz.

 

Deming, No. 1, at Deming............April 8, 1887.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 19, 1889.

 

Las Vegas, at Las Vegas.............March 16, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Santa Fe, at Santa Fe...............May 1, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Hiram, at Albuquerque...............May 7, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Alpha, at Raton.....................May 11, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Nebraska.

 

Omaha Council was organized July 8, 1867, by a Charter from the Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction.

 

Two other councils were chartered by the Grand Council of Kansas.

 

The Grand Council was formed by the delegates of the above-mentioned three councils, November 20, 1872.

 

In 1878 the councils adopted the "Mississippi Plan." In 1886 the Grand Council was revived, and then afterward joined the General Grand Council, where she is now.

 

New Hampshire.

 

 

 

August 5, 1815, four Companions organized a council of Royal Masters at Hopkinton, N.H. J.L. Cross, in 1819, instituted another council of Select Masons, at Hopkinton; these two were united in 1822.

 

On July 9, 1823, a Grand Council was formed.

 

During the period from 1835 to 1855 the councils were dormant.

 

The above two councils, Orphan and Columbian, after 1855 were revived, and Adoniram Council, which had been chartered by the Grand Council of Connecticut united and formed a Grand Council, June 11, 1862.

 

New Jersey

 

Kane Council, No. 11, was chartered by the Grand Council of New York; and two other councils, viz., Scott, No. 13, at New Brunswick, and Gebal, No.

 

14, at Tretiton, were chartered by the Grand Council of Pennsylvania.

 

These three councils organized the Grand Council, November 26, 1860.

 

It has always been an independent Grand Council.

 

New York.

 

The earliest time when we find any organization in the State of New York of the Council degrees is September 10, 1810; at which time a meeting of Royal Masters was held in St. John's Hall, in New York City, and a council of Royal Masters was opened, with Companion Thomas Lowndes presiding; and it was determined to organize a Grand Council to be called Columbian Council of Royal Master Masons for the City of New York.

 

Thomas Lowndes was elected and installed Thrice Illustrious Grand Royal Master.

 

Nineteen members, Royal Master Masons, were present.

 

It is thought, and no doubt correctly so, that this was the very first council formed, and was regarded as authority, as on the evening of December 6, 1817, a petition was received from a council organized in Boston, asking the sanction of Columbian Council for its formation.

 

This was granted, and Benjamin Gleason was recognized as T.I.G.M. of the said new council.

 

From the records of Columbian Council it appears that a council of Knights of the Round Table was convened, as also a Chapter of Illustrious Knights of the Holy Order of the Garter, wherein Companions were installed Knights of the Illustrious and Invincible Order of St. George of Cappadoci, by which latter title the Order was sometimes known.

 

Thomas Lowndes was annually elected T.I.G.R.M. from the organization, September 2, 1810, to July 9, 1820, and presided at every meeting.

 

Five Companions received the degree of Superexcellent Master December 22, 1817.

 

There is no record of the Select Master's degree earlier than November 25, 1821.

 

In January, 1823, it was "Resolved, That it is expedient to form a Grand Council of Royal Master Masons and Select Masons for the State of New York, and that T.I.G.R.M. Thomas Lowndes be requested to call a convention of all the present and past Grand Royal Masters and Deputy Grand Royal Masters and Grand Wardens in this city, in order to carry into effect the formation of said Grand Council." A convention was held January 25, 1823, and a Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters was formed Thomas Lowndes being elected M.I.R.G.M., which council continued until June 4, 1860, when it united with a Grand Council which had been organized in the city of New York, May 27, 1854, by delegates from councils of Royal and Select Masons working under the authority of the Grand Council of Connecticut.

 

In the formation of the General Grand Council the New York Companions took a very active part.

 

North Carolina.

 

At a very early date Masonry was introduced into North Carolina. A Warrant for a lodge, called "Royal White Hart Lodge," at Halifax, was granted August 21, 1767, and the first Grand Council was formed at Fayetteville, June 21, 1822.

 

At the convention for the organization of this body five councils were represented, they having all been chartered by the Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction.

 

The effort to incorporate the degrees with the chapter did not succeed.

 

The Grand Chapter had endeavored to control the degrees, but in 1859 "Resolved, That this Grand Chapter, after due consideration, hereby disclaims for itself and subordinates any and all control over the Royal and Select Master's degrees." The Supreme Council of Southern jurisdiction chartered, by Dr. A, G. Mackey, as agent, three councils, and a Grand Council was organized June 6, 1860.

 

In consequence of the War no meeting was held until 1868. This body was dissolved in 1883, and the degrees were turned over to the Grand Chapter.

 

In 1887 the Grand Council was re-organized.

 

It is now an independent body.

 

Ohio.

 

John Barker, the agent of the Supreme Council Southern Jurisdiction, at a very early day organized five councils in Ohio.

 

J.L. Cross had been in Ohio perhaps as early as 1817; some authors say 1816; we think not, as he had not received his commission as General Grand Lecturer until the session of the General Grand Chapter, June 8, 1816.

 

Moreover, as the General Grand Chapter refused the proposition, at that session, to incorporate the degrees in the chapter work, and as it is asserted by Folger that Cross went to Baltimore, and the paper issued by Eckel and Niles is dated in 1817 (May 27th), the very fair presumption is that Cross did not attempt to confer the Select prior to the date of his authority, whether that "paper" was genuine or a forgery, as Companion Josiah H. Drummond has pronounced it to be. Companion Drummond has traced the "itinerary" of Cross through Western Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and thence to Baltimore, May, 1817.

 

In 1827 a council was established at Cleveland by Charter from the Grand Council of New York.

 

A Grand Council for the State was organized January 6, 1830, by the five councils organized by John Barker.

 

North Dakota.

 

The following councils received their dispensations from the Officers of the General Grand Council, viz. :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation.

 

 

 

 

 

Charter.

 

Casselton, No. 1, at Casselton, December 7, 1888

 

November 10,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1889.

 

Hilkiah, No. 2, at Jamestown,

 

September 1, 1893

 

August 21,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1894.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dispensation.

 

Hiram Council, at Valley City......................December 31,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Rae Council, at Grand Forks........................ January 2,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Zabud Council, at Devil's Lake..................... January 3,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Towner Council, at Towner..........................January 6,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued Adoniram Council, at Fargo........................February 15,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued Damascus Council, at Wahpeton.................... February 18,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Mizpah Council, at Park River..................... March 15,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Tyrian Council, at Lisbon..........................April 6, 1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued Bismarck Council, at Bismarck.....................April 20, 1896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued

 

Oregon.

 

By authority of the General Grand Master of the General Grand Council, Companion A.H. Hodson was authorized to convene not less than five Royal and Select Masters, and to confer the degrees upon not exceeding nine Royal Arch Masons.

 

A dispensation was issued to Pioneer Council, U. D., at McMinnville.

 

Three councils convened February 3, 1885, and formed a Grand Council for Oregon under the jurisdiction of the General Grand Council.

 

Pennsylvania.

 

October 26, 1847, two councils in Pennsylvania, and one in Texas, formed the Grand Council.

 

This Grand Council disbanded and was re-organized in 1854.

 

Papers of the meetings from 1847 to 1851 have been found, but it seems no regular records were ever kept.

 

It was proposed in the Grand Council, in 1854, to turn the degrees over to the control of the Council of Princes of Jerusalem, which, however, was not accepted; and December 30, 1854, the Grand Council was re-organized.

 

It is an independent jurisdiction, but does not recognize those who have received the degree in chapters.

 

Rhode Island.

 

A meeting of Royal Masters was convened in Providence, R.I., March 28, 1818, and May 19th "Resolved, That the degree of Select Master be attached to this Council." J.L. Cross gave that council a Charter in 1819.

 

For many years this council was dormant, and no meeting was held until 1841.

 

The Grand Councils of Massachusetts and Connecticut issued charters to other councils, and the Supreme Council of Northern Jurisdiction A.'.A.'.S.'.R.'.

 

gave authority to confer the degrees of Royal and Select Master upon a Charter for a Lodge of Perfection at Newport, which in 1870 was revoked, a Grand Council having been organized on October 30, 1860, from which a Charter was obtained.

 

This Grand Council is independent.

 

South Carolina

 

In the preface to this chapter much of the early history of the Cryptic degrees has already been given in detail.

 

The Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction had great influence in the direction of the government of the Cryptic Rite in South Carolina.

 

Nine councils of Royal and Select Masons were chartered in the years of 1858 and 1859.

 

The Supreme Council in 1860 waived its rights, and a Grand Council was regularly formed, February 15, 1850.

 

In 1880 the "Missisippi Plan" was adopted.

 

However, in 1881, the Grand Council was re-organized and became a member of the General Grand Council.

 

South Dakota.

 

The following councils received dispensations from the Officers of the General Grand Council in South Dakota:

 

Alpha Council, No. 1,

 

at Sioux Falls...

 

D. April 11, 1891.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. July 21, 1891.

 

Lakota "

 

 

 

"

 

 

 

Deadwood........September 7, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Black Hills Council "

 

Hot Springs.....September 9, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Zabud

 

"

 

 

 

"

 

 

 

Yankton.........September 25, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annulled.

 

Scotland "

 

"

 

 

 

Scotland........October 1, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surrendered.

 

Omega

 

"

 

 

 

"

 

 

 

Salem...........October 10, 1895.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued.

 

Hiram

 

"