A Collection of Assorted Masonic Reunion Spoons from the Scottish Rite Temple in McAlester, Oklahoma

This collection of reunion spoons dates from 1914 to 1919.  The top spoon (# 1) was made to commemorate the Fall Reunion Class and is dated October 27, 28, 29, 1914 and depicts the S.G.I.G. 33rd Degree from Oklahoma, Illustrious Brother D. M. Hailey

Spoon (# 2) was made to commemorate the Winter Reunion A.A.S.R. dated January 23, 24, 25, 1917 and depicts the Seal of Solomon.

Spoon (# 3) was made to commemorate the Winter Reunion dated January 26, 27, 28, 1915 and depicts the Venerable Master of Albert Pike Lodge No. 2 Illustrious Brother Frank Craig, 33rd Degree.
 

Spoon (# 4)  was made to commemorate the Fall Reunion dated October 22, 23, 24, 1918 and depicts the Scottish Rite emblem of the 32nd Degree Double-headed Eagle.

Spoon (# 5) commemorates the Winter Reunion dated January 27, 28, 29, 1914 and depicts an image of the McAlester Scottish Rite Temple.

Spoon (# 6) commemorates the Fall Reunion dated October 12, 13, 14, 1915 and depicts Illustrious W. H. Fuller, 33rd Degree Honorary who was Preceptor Tuskahoma of Council Kadosh No. 2.

Spoon (# 7) commemorates the Spring Reunion dated April 13, 14, 15, 1915 and depicts Illustrious William P. Freeman, 33rd Degree Honorary, who served as the Wise Master, Rose Croix No. 2

Spoon (# 8) commemorates the Mid Winter Reunion dated January 27. 28. 29. 30, 1919 and depicts the 33rd Degree emblem inside a triangle. 

Spoon (# 9) commemorates the Mid Winter Reunion dated January 25, 36, 27, 1916 and depicts an image of Illustrious Brother A. U. Thomas, 33rd Degree who served as Master of Kadosh for Indian Consistory No. 2

  History of the McAlester Scottish Rite

On May 4, 1901, the Southern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite first Temple became known as the Albert Pike Lodge #1 of the Valley of McAlester. The Title of Indian Consistory was added at a later date after the approval by the Southern Jurisdiction. The membership grew fast and it was evident that more room was a necessity. A new site was selected one block Northwest of the then existing site. In 1906 the cornerstone was laid and in 1907 the new building became a reality. In 1928 an expansion program was launched. The West wall was extended 50'. The height of the building grew to a total of 140'. The largest stage in the Southern Jurisdiction was carved from the interior. The lighted ball atop the building added another 30' and became known to all Masons as the "Great Light of Masonry".

In the mid 50's there came about a decree which required all Consistories in the Southern Jurisdiction to be named for their locations. It was at that time that the "Indian Consistory" became the McAlester Consistory. . Exterior floodlights were installed in 1995 thus allowing the building to be viewed at night. The McAlester Consistory has been classified as one of the "Most Beautiful" Scottish Rite buildings in the country. In the Spring of 1998, the McAlester Consistory under the direction of the S.G.I.G. Paul T. Million, Jr., elected to rename the Temple giving it the new title of THE McALESTER SCOTTISH RITE MASONIC CENTER. This Act was authorized by the Southern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite. Over the years other Masonic Bodies began to gather and meet at the building, thus bringing all Masons together as a unified Masonic Family.

 

Highlights of the McAlester Scottish Rite Masonic Center

Museum: Our museum was activated in 1955 and is a functional part of our Scottish Rite. Medals and mementos of those early-day men who founded and fostered the McAlester Consistory are on exhibit, along with elaborate aprons and sheathed swords of other Rites, whose owners pledged to all branches of Masonry. IN 1997 a major portion of the museum was moved and relocated to the first floor Lobby area where it may be viewed by all who visit the Center. The remainder of the museum is still located on the second floor east.

Pipe Organs: One of the largest and finest pipe organs in the entire country is located in the McAlester Scottish Rite Masonic Center. This custom -built Kimball Organ with a 51-rank console and over 3,100 pipes was installed in 1930. It's current appraised value is well over $550,000.00 Originally in the choir loft, it is now located in our auditorium

 

 

         

Museum Home Page     Phoenixmasonry Home Page

Copyrighted 1999 - 2014   Phoenixmasonry, Inc.      The Fine Print